SSC CGL (Tier - 2) Online Exam Paper - 2019 "held on 18 November 2020" Evening Shift (English Language and Comprehension)



SSC CGL (Tier - 2) Online Exam Paper - 2019 "held on 18 November 2020"

Evening Shift (English Language and Comprehension)



  • Exam Name: SSC CGL (Tier - 2)
  • Year: 2019
  • EXAM DATE : 18 November 20120
  • EXAM START TIME : 03.00
  • Total Marks: 200 

Comprehension:
In the given passage some words have been deleted. Fill in the blanks with the help of the
alternatives given. Select the most appropriate option for each number.
Gabriella Montez was comfortably curled up in an overstuffed chair in the sitting area. She
was (1) _________ the peace and quiet at home - everyone else was (2) ________ at the
party - and had totally lost (3) __________ in a book which was the best she had (4)
_________ read and she couldn’t wait to get (5) _______the end.
However, before she set her eyes (6) ________ the next page, the book was (7) ________
right out of her hands, and she (8) __________ at her mother standing over her. “Gabby, it’s
New Year’s Eve,” she said. “(9) __________ reading!” she snapped at her daughter.
“But, mum, I’m almost done,” Gabriella (10) __________.
SubQuestion No : 1
Q.1 Select the most appropriate option to fill in blank No.1

Option:
1. enjoying
2. living
3. calming
4. relaxing
Comprehension:
In the given passage some words have been deleted. Fill in the blanks with the help of the
alternatives given. Select the most appropriate option for each number.
Gabriella Montez was comfortably curled up in an overstuffed chair in the sitting area. She
was (1) _________ the peace and quiet at home - everyone else was (2) ________ at the
party - and had totally lost (3) __________ in a book which was the best she had (4)
_________ read and she couldn’t wait to get (5) _______the end.
However, before she set her eyes (6) ________ the next page, the book was (7) ________
right out of her hands, and she (8) __________ at her mother standing over her. “Gabby, it’s
New Year’s Eve,” she said. “(9) __________ reading!” she snapped at her daughter.
“But, mum, I’m almost done,” Gabriella (10) __________.
SubQuestion No : 2
Q.2 Select the most appropriate option to fill in blank No.2

Option:
1. before
2. already 
3. once
4. earlier
Comprehension:
In the given passage some words have been deleted. Fill in the blanks with the help of the
alternatives given. Select the most appropriate option for each number.
Gabriella Montez was comfortably curled up in an overstuffed chair in the sitting area. She
was (1) _________ the peace and quiet at home - everyone else was (2) ________ at the
party - and had totally lost (3) __________ in a book which was the best she had (4)
_________ read and she couldn’t wait to get (5) _______the end.
However, before she set her eyes (6) ________ the next page, the book was (7) ________
right out of her hands, and she (8) __________ at her mother standing over her. “Gabby, it’s
New Year’s Eve,” she said. “(9) __________ reading!” she snapped at her daughter.
“But, mum, I’m almost done,” Gabriella (10) __________.
SubQuestion No : 3
Q.3 Select the most appropriate option to fill in blank No.3

Option:
1. itself
2. himself
3. ourself
4. herself
Comprehension:
In the given passage some words have been deleted. Fill in the blanks with the help of the
alternatives given. Select the most appropriate option for each number.
Gabriella Montez was comfortably curled up in an overstuffed chair in the sitting area. She
was (1) _________ the peace and quiet at home - everyone else was (2) ________ at the
party - and had totally lost (3) __________ in a book which was the best she had (4)
_________ read and she couldn’t wait to get (5) _______the end.
However, before she set her eyes (6) ________ the next page, the book was (7) ________
right out of her hands, and she (8) __________ at her mother standing over her. “Gabby, it’s
New Year’s Eve,” she said. “(9) __________ reading!” she snapped at her daughter.
“But, mum, I’m almost done,” Gabriella (10) __________.
SubQuestion No : 4
Q.4 Select the most appropriate option to fill in blank No.4

Option:
1. always
2. even
3. never
4. ever
Comprehension:
In the given passage some words have been deleted. Fill in the blanks with the help of the
alternatives given. Select the most appropriate option for each number.
Gabriella Montez was comfortably curled up in an overstuffed chair in the sitting area. She
was (1) _________ the peace and quiet at home - everyone else was (2) ________ at the
party - and had totally lost (3) __________ in a book which was the best she had (4)
_________ read and she couldn’t wait to get (5) _______the end.
However, before she set her eyes (6) ________ the next page, the book was (7) ________
right out of her hands, and she (8) __________ at her mother standing over her. “Gabby, it’s
New Year’s Eve,” she said. “(9) __________ reading!” she snapped at her daughter.
“But, mum, I’m almost done,” Gabriella (10) __________.
SubQuestion No : 5
Q.5 Select the most appropriate option to fill in blank No.5

Option:
1. up
2. on
3. to
4. in
Comprehension:
In the given passage some words have been deleted. Fill in the blanks with the help of the
alternatives given. Select the most appropriate option for each number.
Gabriella Montez was comfortably curled up in an overstuffed chair in the sitting area. She
was (1) _________ the peace and quiet at home - everyone else was (2) ________ at the
party - and had totally lost (3) __________ in a book which was the best she had (4)
_________ read and she couldn’t wait to get (5) _______the end.
However, before she set her eyes (6) ________ the next page, the book was (7) ________
right out of her hands, and she (8) __________ at her mother standing over her. “Gabby, it’s
New Year’s Eve,” she said. “(9) __________ reading!” she snapped at her daughter.
“But, mum, I’m almost done,” Gabriella (10) __________.
SubQuestion No : 6
Q.6 Select the most appropriate option to fill in blank No.6

Option:
1. below
2. above
3. along
4. upon
Comprehension:
In the given passage some words have been deleted. Fill in the blanks with the help of the
alternatives given. Select the most appropriate option for each number.
Gabriella Montez was comfortably curled up in an overstuffed chair in the sitting area. She
was (1) _________ the peace and quiet at home - everyone else was (2) ________ at the
party - and had totally lost (3) __________ in a book which was the best she had (4)
_________ read and she couldn’t wait to get (5) _______the end.
However, before she set her eyes (6) ________ the next page, the book was (7) ________
right out of her hands, and she (8) __________ at her mother standing over her. “Gabby, it’s
New Year’s Eve,” she said. “(9) __________ reading!” she snapped at her daughter.
“But, mum, I’m almost done,” Gabriella (10) __________.
SubQuestion No : 7
Q.7 Select the most appropriate option to fill in blank No.7

Option:
1. raised
2. lifted
3. boosted
4. climbed
Comprehension:
In the given passage some words have been deleted. Fill in the blanks with the help of the
alternatives given. Select the most appropriate option for each number.
Gabriella Montez was comfortably curled up in an overstuffed chair in the sitting area. She
was (1) _________ the peace and quiet at home - everyone else was (2) ________ at the
party - and had totally lost (3) __________ in a book which was the best she had (4)
_________ read and she couldn’t wait to get (5) _______the end.
However, before she set her eyes (6) ________ the next page, the book was (7) ________
right out of her hands, and she (8) __________ at her mother standing over her. “Gabby, it’s
New Year’s Eve,” she said. “(9) __________ reading!” she snapped at her daughter.
“But, mum, I’m almost done,” Gabriella (10) __________.
SubQuestion No : 8
Q.8 Select the most appropriate option to fill in blank No.8

Option:
1. stared
2. noticed
3. watched
4. wondered
Comprehension:
In the given passage some words have been deleted. Fill in the blanks with the help of the
alternatives given. Select the most appropriate option for each number.
Gabriella Montez was comfortably curled up in an overstuffed chair in the sitting area. She
was (1) _________ the peace and quiet at home - everyone else was (2) ________ at the
party - and had totally lost (3) __________ in a book which was the best she had (4)
_________ read and she couldn’t wait to get (5) _______the end.
However, before she set her eyes (6) ________ the next page, the book was (7) ________
right out of her hands, and she (8) __________ at her mother standing over her. “Gabby, it’s
New Year’s Eve,” she said. “(9) __________ reading!” she snapped at her daughter.
“But, mum, I’m almost done,” Gabriella (10) __________.
SubQuestion No : 9
Q.9 Select the most appropriate option to fill in blank No.9

Option:
1. Adequate
2. Sufficient
3. Abundant
4. Enough
Comprehension:
In the given passage some words have been deleted. Fill in the blanks with the help of the
alternatives given. Select the most appropriate option for each number.
Gabriella Montez was comfortably curled up in an overstuffed chair in the sitting area. She
was (1) _________ the peace and quiet at home - everyone else was (2) ________ at the
party - and had totally lost (3) __________ in a book which was the best she had (4)
_________ read and she couldn’t wait to get (5) _______the end.
However, before she set her eyes (6) ________ the next page, the book was (7) ________
right out of her hands, and she (8) __________ at her mother standing over her. “Gabby, it’s
New Year’s Eve,” she said. “(9) __________ reading!” she snapped at her daughter.
“But, mum, I’m almost done,” Gabriella (10) __________.
SubQuestion No : 10
Q.10 Select the most appropriate option to fill in blank No.10

Option:
1. prohibited
2. prevented
3. prescribed
4. protested

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Comprehension:
In the given passage some words have been deleted. Fill in the blanks with the help of the
alternatives given. Select the most appropriate option for each number.
The word ‘diet’ is associated with the feeling of developing eating (1) _________ that are
time-bound, coupled (2) ________ a strict food plan. But the (3) ________ meaning of diet is
the food (4) _________ which a person follows daily. It (5) ________ creating a food plan that
(6) _________ around your lifestyle, your work, (7) _________ quality of your sleep, your (8)
__________ level, the kind of (9) _______ you do, your palate and your (10) ___________.
SubQuestion No : 11
Q.11 Select the most appropriate option to fill in blank No.1

Option:
1. manners
2. customs
3. habits
4. natures
Comprehension:
In the given passage some words have been deleted. Fill in the blanks with the help of the
alternatives given. Select the most appropriate option for each number.
The word ‘diet’ is associated with the feeling of developing eating (1) _________ that are
time-bound, coupled (2) ________ a strict food plan. But the (3) ________ meaning of diet is
the food (4) _________ which a person follows daily. It (5) ________ creating a food plan that
(6) _________ around your lifestyle, your work, (7) _________ quality of your sleep, your (8)
__________ level, the kind of (9) _______ you do, your palate and your (10) ___________.
SubQuestion No : 12
Q.12 Select the most appropriate option to fill in blank No.2

Option:
1. with
2. on
3. from
4. for
Comprehension:
In the given passage some words have been deleted. Fill in the blanks with the help of the
alternatives given. Select the most appropriate option for each number.
The word ‘diet’ is associated with the feeling of developing eating (1) _________ that are
time-bound, coupled (2) ________ a strict food plan. But the (3) ________ meaning of diet is
the food (4) _________ which a person follows daily. It (5) ________ creating a food plan that
(6) _________ around your lifestyle, your work, (7) _________ quality of your sleep, your (8)
__________ level, the kind of (9) _______ you do, your palate and your (10) ___________.
SubQuestion No : 13
Q.13 Select the most appropriate option to fill in blank No.3

Option:
1. actual
2. positive
3. total
4. confident
Comprehension:
In the given passage some words have been deleted. Fill in the blanks with the help of the
alternatives given. Select the most appropriate option for each number.
The word ‘diet’ is associated with the feeling of developing eating (1) _________ that are
time-bound, coupled (2) ________ a strict food plan. But the (3) ________ meaning of diet is
the food (4) _________ which a person follows daily. It (5) ________ creating a food plan that
(6) _________ around your lifestyle, your work, (7) _________ quality of your sleep, your (8)
__________ level, the kind of (9) _______ you do, your palate and your (10) ___________.
SubQuestion No : 14
Q.14 Select the most appropriate option to fill in blank No.4

Option:
1. routine
2. activity
3. procedure
4. sequence
Comprehension:
In the given passage some words have been deleted. Fill in the blanks with the help of the
alternatives given. Select the most appropriate option for each number.
The word ‘diet’ is associated with the feeling of developing eating (1) _________ that are
time-bound, coupled (2) ________ a strict food plan. But the (3) ________ meaning of diet is
the food (4) _________ which a person follows daily. It (5) ________ creating a food plan that
(6) _________ around your lifestyle, your work, (7) _________ quality of your sleep, your (8)
__________ level, the kind of (9) _______ you do, your palate and your (10) ___________.
SubQuestion No : 15
Q.15 Select the most appropriate option to fill in blank No.5

Option:
1. associates
2. involves
3. desires
4. proves
Comprehension:
In the given passage some words have been deleted. Fill in the blanks with the help of the
alternatives given. Select the most appropriate option for each number.
The word ‘diet’ is associated with the feeling of developing eating (1) _________ that are
time-bound, coupled (2) ________ a strict food plan. But the (3) ________ meaning of diet is
the food (4) _________ which a person follows daily. It (5) ________ creating a food plan that
(6) _________ around your lifestyle, your work, (7) _________ quality of your sleep, your (8)
__________ level, the kind of (9) _______ you do, your palate and your (10) ___________.
SubQuestion No : 16
Q.16 Select the most appropriate option to fill in blank No.6

Option:
1. resolves
2. orders
3. orbits
4. revolves
Comprehension:
In the given passage some words have been deleted. Fill in the blanks with the help of the
alternatives given. Select the most appropriate option for each number.
The word ‘diet’ is associated with the feeling of developing eating (1) _________ that are
time-bound, coupled (2) ________ a strict food plan. But the (3) ________ meaning of diet is
the food (4) _________ which a person follows daily. It (5) ________ creating a food plan that
(6) _________ around your lifestyle, your work, (7) _________ quality of your sleep, your (8)
__________ level, the kind of (9) _______ you do, your palate and your (10) ___________.
SubQuestion No : 17
Q.17 Select the most appropriate option to fill in blank No.7

Option:
1. only
2. the
3. a
4. one
Comprehension:
In the given passage some words have been deleted. Fill in the blanks with the help of the
alternatives given. Select the most appropriate option for each number.
The word ‘diet’ is associated with the feeling of developing eating (1) _________ that are
time-bound, coupled (2) ________ a strict food plan. But the (3) ________ meaning of diet is
the food (4) _________ which a person follows daily. It (5) ________ creating a food plan that
(6) _________ around your lifestyle, your work, (7) _________ quality of your sleep, your (8)
__________ level, the kind of (9) _______ you do, your palate and your (10) ___________.
SubQuestion No : 18
Q.18 Select the most appropriate option to fill in blank No.8

Option:
1. capacity
2. force
3. authority
4. stress
Comprehension:
In the given passage some words have been deleted. Fill in the blanks with the help of the
alternatives given. Select the most appropriate option for each number.
The word ‘diet’ is associated with the feeling of developing eating (1) _________ that are
time-bound, coupled (2) ________ a strict food plan. But the (3) ________ meaning of diet is
the food (4) _________ which a person follows daily. It (5) ________ creating a food plan that
(6) _________ around your lifestyle, your work, (7) _________ quality of your sleep, your (8)
__________ level, the kind of (9) _______ you do, your palate and your (10) ___________.
SubQuestion No : 19
Q.19 Select the most appropriate option to fill in blank No.9

Option:
1. fitness
2. effort
3. lesson
4. exercise
Comprehension:
In the given passage some words have been deleted. Fill in the blanks with the help of the
alternatives given. Select the most appropriate option for each number.
The word ‘diet’ is associated with the feeling of developing eating (1) _________ that are
time-bound, coupled (2) ________ a strict food plan. But the (3) ________ meaning of diet is
the food (4) _________ which a person follows daily. It (5) ________ creating a food plan that
(6) _________ around your lifestyle, your work, (7) _________ quality of your sleep, your (8)
__________ level, the kind of (9) _______ you do, your palate and your (10) ___________.
SubQuestion No : 20
Q.20 Select the most appropriate option to fill in blank No.10

Option:
1. impersonation
2. person
3. personality
4. personal
Comprehension:
In the given passage some words have been deleted. Fill in the blanks with the help of the
alternatives given. Select the most appropriate option for each number.
Ragi is a popular annual plant that is (1) _________ with healthy nutrients. It is a good (2)
_______ of iron, protein, calcium and (3) ________ minerals. It is also rich in fibre and (4)
_______ in weight loss as it contains (5) ______ saturated fats.
SubQuestion No : 21
Q.21 Select the most appropriate option to fill in blank No.1

Option:
1. loaded
2. full
3. supplied
4. complete
Comprehension:
In the given passage some words have been deleted. Fill in the blanks with the help of the
alternatives given. Select the most appropriate option for each number.
Ragi is a popular annual plant that is (1) _________ with healthy nutrients. It is a good (2)
_______ of iron, protein, calcium and (3) ________ minerals. It is also rich in fibre and (4)
_______ in weight loss as it contains (5) ______ saturated fats.
SubQuestion No : 22
Q.22 Select the most appropriate option to fill in blank No.2

Option:
1. source
2. cause
3. origin
4. spring
Comprehension:
In the given passage some words have been deleted. Fill in the blanks with the help of the
alternatives given. Select the most appropriate option for each number.
Ragi is a popular annual plant that is (1) _________ with healthy nutrients. It is a good (2)
_______ of iron, protein, calcium and (3) ________ minerals. It is also rich in fibre and (4)
_______ in weight loss as it contains (5) ______ saturated fats.
SubQuestion No : 23
Q.23 Select the most appropriate option to fill in blank No.3

Option:
1. further
2. other
3. another
4. else
Comprehension:
In the given passage some words have been deleted. Fill in the blanks with the help of the
alternatives given. Select the most appropriate option for each number.
Ragi is a popular annual plant that is (1) _________ with healthy nutrients. It is a good (2)
_______ of iron, protein, calcium and (3) ________ minerals. It is also rich in fibre and (4)
_______ in weight loss as it contains (5) ______ saturated fats.
SubQuestion No : 24
Q.24 Select the most appropriate option to fill in blank No.4

Option:
1. benefit
2. services
3. help
4. aids
Comprehension:
In the given passage some words have been deleted. Fill in the blanks with the help of the
alternatives given. Select the most appropriate option for each number.
Ragi is a popular annual plant that is (1) _________ with healthy nutrients. It is a good (2)
_______ of iron, protein, calcium and (3) ________ minerals. It is also rich in fibre and (4)
_______ in weight loss as it contains (5) ______ saturated fats.
SubQuestion No : 25
Q.25 Select the most appropriate option to fill in blank No.5

Option:
1. applicable
2. negligible
3. communicable
4. negotiable
Comprehension:
Read the passage and answer the questions that follow.
The first time that Agha Shahid Ali spoke to me about his approaching death was on 25 April
2001. The conversation began routinely. I had telephoned to remind him that we had been
invited to a friend’s house for lunch. Although he had been under treatment for cancer for
some fourteen months, Shahid was still on his feet and perfectly lucid, except for occasional
lapses of memory. I heard him thumbing through his engagement book and then suddenly he
said: ‘Oh dear. I can’t see a thing.’ There was a brief pause and then he added: ‘I hope this
doesn’t mean that I’m dying...’ I did not know how to respond: his voice was completely at
odds with the content of what he had just said, light to the point of jocularity. I mumbled
something innocuous: ‘No Shahid — of course not. You’ll be fine.’ He cut me short. In a tone
of voice that was at once quizzical and direct, he said: ‘When it happens I hope you’ll write
something about me.’
I was shocked into silence and a long moment passed before I could bring myself to say the
things that people say on such occasions. ‘Shahid you’ll be fine; you have to be strong...’
From the window of my study I could see a corner of the building in which he lived, some
eight blocks away. It was just a few months since he moved there: he had been living a few
miles away, in Manhattan, when he had a sudden blackout in February 2000. After tests
revealed that he had a malignant brain tumour, he decided to move to Brooklyn, to be close to
his youngest sister, Sameetah, who teaches at the Pratt Institute—a few blocks away from the
street where I live. Shahid ignored my reassurances. He began to laugh and it was then that I
realised that he was dead serious. I understood that he was entrusting me with a quite
specific charge: he wanted me to remember him not through the spoken recitatives of
memory and friendship, but through the written word.
He knew that my instincts would have led me to search for reasons to avoid writing about his
death: I would have told myself that I was not a poet; that our friendship was of recent date;
that there were many others who knew him much better and would be writing from greater
understanding and knowledge. All this Shahid had guessed and he had decided to shut off
those routes while there was still time. ‘You must write about me.’ Finally, I said: ‘Shahid, I will:
I’ll do the best I can.’
SubQuestion No : 26
Q.26 What did Shahid request the narrator to do?

Option:
1. Write about him after his death
2. Take him along for lunch at their friend’s place
3. Move to his house in Manhattan
4. Be strong and bear the loss bravely
Comprehension:
Read the passage and answer the questions that follow.
The first time that Agha Shahid Ali spoke to me about his approaching death was on 25 April
2001. The conversation began routinely. I had telephoned to remind him that we had been
invited to a friend’s house for lunch. Although he had been under treatment for cancer for
some fourteen months, Shahid was still on his feet and perfectly lucid, except for occasional
lapses of memory. I heard him thumbing through his engagement book and then suddenly he
said: ‘Oh dear. I can’t see a thing.’ There was a brief pause and then he added: ‘I hope this
doesn’t mean that I’m dying...’ I did not know how to respond: his voice was completely at
odds with the content of what he had just said, light to the point of jocularity. I mumbled
something innocuous: ‘No Shahid — of course not. You’ll be fine.’ He cut me short. In a tone
of voice that was at once quizzical and direct, he said: ‘When it happens I hope you’ll write
something about me.’
I was shocked into silence and a long moment passed before I could bring myself to say the
things that people say on such occasions. ‘Shahid you’ll be fine; you have to be strong...’
From the window of my study I could see a corner of the building in which he lived, some
eight blocks away. It was just a few months since he moved there: he had been living a few
miles away, in Manhattan, when he had a sudden blackout in February 2000. After tests
revealed that he had a malignant brain tumour, he decided to move to Brooklyn, to be close to
his youngest sister, Sameetah, who teaches at the Pratt Institute—a few blocks away from the
street where I live. Shahid ignored my reassurances. He began to laugh and it was then that I
realised that he was dead serious. I understood that he was entrusting me with a quite
specific charge: he wanted me to remember him not through the spoken recitatives of
memory and friendship, but through the written word. 
He knew that my instincts would have led me to search for reasons to avoid writing about his
death: I would have told myself that I was not a poet; that our friendship was of recent date;
that there were many others who knew him much better and would be writing from greater
understanding and knowledge. All this Shahid had guessed and he had decided to shut off
those routes while there was still time. ‘You must write about me.’ Finally, I said: ‘Shahid, I will:
I’ll do the best I can.’
SubQuestion No : 27
Q.27 Shahid was perfectly ‘lucid’. This suggests he was:

Option:
1. confused
2. in a delirium
3. speaking coherently
4. not intelligible
Comprehension:
Read the passage and answer the questions that follow.
The first time that Agha Shahid Ali spoke to me about his approaching death was on 25 April
2001. The conversation began routinely. I had telephoned to remind him that we had been
invited to a friend’s house for lunch. Although he had been under treatment for cancer for
some fourteen months, Shahid was still on his feet and perfectly lucid, except for occasional
lapses of memory. I heard him thumbing through his engagement book and then suddenly he
said: ‘Oh dear. I can’t see a thing.’ There was a brief pause and then he added: ‘I hope this
doesn’t mean that I’m dying...’ I did not know how to respond: his voice was completely at
odds with the content of what he had just said, light to the point of jocularity. I mumbled
something innocuous: ‘No Shahid — of course not. You’ll be fine.’ He cut me short. In a tone
of voice that was at once quizzical and direct, he said: ‘When it happens I hope you’ll write
something about me.’
I was shocked into silence and a long moment passed before I could bring myself to say the
things that people say on such occasions. ‘Shahid you’ll be fine; you have to be strong...’
From the window of my study I could see a corner of the building in which he lived, some
eight blocks away. It was just a few months since he moved there: he had been living a few
miles away, in Manhattan, when he had a sudden blackout in February 2000. After tests
revealed that he had a malignant brain tumour, he decided to move to Brooklyn, to be close to
his youngest sister, Sameetah, who teaches at the Pratt Institute—a few blocks away from the
street where I live. Shahid ignored my reassurances. He began to laugh and it was then that I
realised that he was dead serious. I understood that he was entrusting me with a quite
specific charge: he wanted me to remember him not through the spoken recitatives of
memory and friendship, but through the written word. 
He knew that my instincts would have led me to search for reasons to avoid writing about his
death: I would have told myself that I was not a poet; that our friendship was of recent date;
that there were many others who knew him much better and would be writing from greater
understanding and knowledge. All this Shahid had guessed and he had decided to shut off
those routes while there was still time. ‘You must write about me.’ Finally, I said: ‘Shahid, I will:
I’ll do the best I can.’
SubQuestion No : 28
Q.28 Shahid’s voice was full of ‘jocularity’. This means it was:

Option:
1. humorous
2. bitter
3. melodious
4. sorrowful
Comprehension:
Read the passage and answer the questions that follow.
The first time that Agha Shahid Ali spoke to me about his approaching death was on 25 April
2001. The conversation began routinely. I had telephoned to remind him that we had been
invited to a friend’s house for lunch. Although he had been under treatment for cancer for
some fourteen months, Shahid was still on his feet and perfectly lucid, except for occasional
lapses of memory. I heard him thumbing through his engagement book and then suddenly he
said: ‘Oh dear. I can’t see a thing.’ There was a brief pause and then he added: ‘I hope this
doesn’t mean that I’m dying...’ I did not know how to respond: his voice was completely at
odds with the content of what he had just said, light to the point of jocularity. I mumbled
something innocuous: ‘No Shahid — of course not. You’ll be fine.’ He cut me short. In a tone
of voice that was at once quizzical and direct, he said: ‘When it happens I hope you’ll write
something about me.’
I was shocked into silence and a long moment passed before I could bring myself to say the
things that people say on such occasions. ‘Shahid you’ll be fine; you have to be strong...’
From the window of my study I could see a corner of the building in which he lived, some
eight blocks away. It was just a few months since he moved there: he had been living a few
miles away, in Manhattan, when he had a sudden blackout in February 2000. After tests
revealed that he had a malignant brain tumour, he decided to move to Brooklyn, to be close to
his youngest sister, Sameetah, who teaches at the Pratt Institute—a few blocks away from the
street where I live. Shahid ignored my reassurances. He began to laugh and it was then that I
realised that he was dead serious. I understood that he was entrusting me with a quite
specific charge: he wanted me to remember him not through the spoken recitatives of
memory and friendship, but through the written word. 
He knew that my instincts would have led me to search for reasons to avoid writing about his
death: I would have told myself that I was not a poet; that our friendship was of recent date;
that there were many others who knew him much better and would be writing from greater
understanding and knowledge. All this Shahid had guessed and he had decided to shut off
those routes while there was still time. ‘You must write about me.’ Finally, I said: ‘Shahid, I will:
I’ll do the best I can.’
SubQuestion No : 29
Q.29 Which of these was NOT an excuse that the narrator thought of to decline Shahid’s
request?

Option:
1. That others knew Shahid better
2. That their friendship was quite recent
3. That he was too busy
4. That he was not a poet
Comprehension:
Read the passage and answer the questions that follow.
The first time that Agha Shahid Ali spoke to me about his approaching death was on 25 April
2001. The conversation began routinely. I had telephoned to remind him that we had been
invited to a friend’s house for lunch. Although he had been under treatment for cancer for
some fourteen months, Shahid was still on his feet and perfectly lucid, except for occasional
lapses of memory. I heard him thumbing through his engagement book and then suddenly he
said: ‘Oh dear. I can’t see a thing.’ There was a brief pause and then he added: ‘I hope this
doesn’t mean that I’m dying...’ I did not know how to respond: his voice was completely at
odds with the content of what he had just said, light to the point of jocularity. I mumbled
something innocuous: ‘No Shahid — of course not. You’ll be fine.’ He cut me short. In a tone
of voice that was at once quizzical and direct, he said: ‘When it happens I hope you’ll write
something about me.’
I was shocked into silence and a long moment passed before I could bring myself to say the
things that people say on such occasions. ‘Shahid you’ll be fine; you have to be strong...’
From the window of my study I could see a corner of the building in which he lived, some
eight blocks away. It was just a few months since he moved there: he had been living a few
miles away, in Manhattan, when he had a sudden blackout in February 2000. After tests
revealed that he had a malignant brain tumour, he decided to move to Brooklyn, to be close to
his youngest sister, Sameetah, who teaches at the Pratt Institute—a few blocks away from the
street where I live. Shahid ignored my reassurances. He began to laugh and it was then that I
realised that he was dead serious. I understood that he was entrusting me with a quite
specific charge: he wanted me to remember him not through the spoken recitatives of
memory and friendship, but through the written word. 
He knew that my instincts would have led me to search for reasons to avoid writing about his
death: I would have told myself that I was not a poet; that our friendship was of recent date;
that there were many others who knew him much better and would be writing from greater
understanding and knowledge. All this Shahid had guessed and he had decided to shut off
those routes while there was still time. ‘You must write about me.’ Finally, I said: ‘Shahid, I will:
I’ll do the best I can.’
SubQuestion No : 30
Q.30 Why had the narrator called Shahid Ali?

Option:
1. To remind him about a lunch invitation
2. To cheer him up in his depression
3. To enquire about his health
4. To give him an important task
Comprehension:
Read the passage and answer the questions that follow.
The first time that Agha Shahid Ali spoke to me about his approaching death was on 25 April
2001. The conversation began routinely. I had telephoned to remind him that we had been
invited to a friend’s house for lunch. Although he had been under treatment for cancer for
some fourteen months, Shahid was still on his feet and perfectly lucid, except for occasional
lapses of memory. I heard him thumbing through his engagement book and then suddenly he
said: ‘Oh dear. I can’t see a thing.’ There was a brief pause and then he added: ‘I hope this
doesn’t mean that I’m dying...’ I did not know how to respond: his voice was completely at
odds with the content of what he had just said, light to the point of jocularity. I mumbled
something innocuous: ‘No Shahid — of course not. You’ll be fine.’ He cut me short. In a tone
of voice that was at once quizzical and direct, he said: ‘When it happens I hope you’ll write
something about me.’
I was shocked into silence and a long moment passed before I could bring myself to say the
things that people say on such occasions. ‘Shahid you’ll be fine; you have to be strong...’
From the window of my study I could see a corner of the building in which he lived, some
eight blocks away. It was just a few months since he moved there: he had been living a few
miles away, in Manhattan, when he had a sudden blackout in February 2000. After tests
revealed that he had a malignant brain tumour, he decided to move to Brooklyn, to be close to
his youngest sister, Sameetah, who teaches at the Pratt Institute—a few blocks away from the
street where I live. Shahid ignored my reassurances. He began to laugh and it was then that I
realised that he was dead serious. I understood that he was entrusting me with a quite
specific charge: he wanted me to remember him not through the spoken recitatives of
memory and friendship, but through the written word. 
He knew that my instincts would have led me to search for reasons to avoid writing about his
death: I would have told myself that I was not a poet; that our friendship was of recent date;
that there were many others who knew him much better and would be writing from greater
understanding and knowledge. All this Shahid had guessed and he had decided to shut off
those routes while there was still time. ‘You must write about me.’ Finally, I said: ‘Shahid, I will:
I’ll do the best I can.’
SubQuestion No : 31
Q.31 Shahid had moved to Brooklyn to:

Option:
1. get treatment for cancer
2. fulfil certain engagements
3. teach at Pratt Institute
4. be close to his youngest sister
Comprehension:
Read the passage and answer the questions that follow.
The first time that Agha Shahid Ali spoke to me about his approaching death was on 25 April
2001. The conversation began routinely. I had telephoned to remind him that we had been
invited to a friend’s house for lunch. Although he had been under treatment for cancer for
some fourteen months, Shahid was still on his feet and perfectly lucid, except for occasional
lapses of memory. I heard him thumbing through his engagement book and then suddenly he
said: ‘Oh dear. I can’t see a thing.’ There was a brief pause and then he added: ‘I hope this
doesn’t mean that I’m dying...’ I did not know how to respond: his voice was completely at
odds with the content of what he had just said, light to the point of jocularity. I mumbled
something innocuous: ‘No Shahid — of course not. You’ll be fine.’ He cut me short. In a tone
of voice that was at once quizzical and direct, he said: ‘When it happens I hope you’ll write
something about me.’
I was shocked into silence and a long moment passed before I could bring myself to say the
things that people say on such occasions. ‘Shahid you’ll be fine; you have to be strong...’
From the window of my study I could see a corner of the building in which he lived, some
eight blocks away. It was just a few months since he moved there: he had been living a few
miles away, in Manhattan, when he had a sudden blackout in February 2000. After tests
revealed that he had a malignant brain tumour, he decided to move to Brooklyn, to be close to
his youngest sister, Sameetah, who teaches at the Pratt Institute—a few blocks away from the
street where I live. Shahid ignored my reassurances. He began to laugh and it was then that I
realised that he was dead serious. I understood that he was entrusting me with a quite
specific charge: he wanted me to remember him not through the spoken recitatives of
memory and friendship, but through the written word. 
He knew that my instincts would have led me to search for reasons to avoid writing about his
death: I would have told myself that I was not a poet; that our friendship was of recent date;
that there were many others who knew him much better and would be writing from greater
understanding and knowledge. All this Shahid had guessed and he had decided to shut off
those routes while there was still time. ‘You must write about me.’ Finally, I said: ‘Shahid, I will:
I’ll do the best I can.’
SubQuestion No : 32
Q.32 The narrator was reluctant to write about Shahid because:

Option:
1. the subject did not interest him
2. he didn’t have enough time
3. he wouldn’t be paid for it
4. it would be emotionally tough for him
Comprehension:
Read the passage and answer the questions that follow.
The first time that Agha Shahid Ali spoke to me about his approaching death was on 25 April
2001. The conversation began routinely. I had telephoned to remind him that we had been
invited to a friend’s house for lunch. Although he had been under treatment for cancer for
some fourteen months, Shahid was still on his feet and perfectly lucid, except for occasional
lapses of memory. I heard him thumbing through his engagement book and then suddenly he
said: ‘Oh dear. I can’t see a thing.’ There was a brief pause and then he added: ‘I hope this
doesn’t mean that I’m dying...’ I did not know how to respond: his voice was completely at
odds with the content of what he had just said, light to the point of jocularity. I mumbled
something innocuous: ‘No Shahid — of course not. You’ll be fine.’ He cut me short. In a tone
of voice that was at once quizzical and direct, he said: ‘When it happens I hope you’ll write
something about me.’
I was shocked into silence and a long moment passed before I could bring myself to say the
things that people say on such occasions. ‘Shahid you’ll be fine; you have to be strong...’
From the window of my study I could see a corner of the building in which he lived, some
eight blocks away. It was just a few months since he moved there: he had been living a few
miles away, in Manhattan, when he had a sudden blackout in February 2000. After tests
revealed that he had a malignant brain tumour, he decided to move to Brooklyn, to be close to
his youngest sister, Sameetah, who teaches at the Pratt Institute—a few blocks away from the
street where I live. Shahid ignored my reassurances. He began to laugh and it was then that I
realised that he was dead serious. I understood that he was entrusting me with a quite
specific charge: he wanted me to remember him not through the spoken recitatives of
memory and friendship, but through the written word. 
He knew that my instincts would have led me to search for reasons to avoid writing about his
death: I would have told myself that I was not a poet; that our friendship was of recent date;
that there were many others who knew him much better and would be writing from greater
understanding and knowledge. All this Shahid had guessed and he had decided to shut off
those routes while there was still time. ‘You must write about me.’ Finally, I said: ‘Shahid, I will:
I’ll do the best I can.’
SubQuestion No : 33
Q.33 What made Shahid think his end was near?

Option:
1. He was unable to think clearly.
2. He was unable to stand on his feet.
3. He couldn’t utter a word.
4. He suddenly couldn’t see anything.
Comprehension:
Read the passage and answer the questions that follow.
The first time that Agha Shahid Ali spoke to me about his approaching death was on 25 April
2001. The conversation began routinely. I had telephoned to remind him that we had been
invited to a friend’s house for lunch. Although he had been under treatment for cancer for
some fourteen months, Shahid was still on his feet and perfectly lucid, except for occasional
lapses of memory. I heard him thumbing through his engagement book and then suddenly he
said: ‘Oh dear. I can’t see a thing.’ There was a brief pause and then he added: ‘I hope this
doesn’t mean that I’m dying...’ I did not know how to respond: his voice was completely at
odds with the content of what he had just said, light to the point of jocularity. I mumbled
something innocuous: ‘No Shahid — of course not. You’ll be fine.’ He cut me short. In a tone
of voice that was at once quizzical and direct, he said: ‘When it happens I hope you’ll write
something about me.’
I was shocked into silence and a long moment passed before I could bring myself to say the
things that people say on such occasions. ‘Shahid you’ll be fine; you have to be strong...’
From the window of my study I could see a corner of the building in which he lived, some
eight blocks away. It was just a few months since he moved there: he had been living a few
miles away, in Manhattan, when he had a sudden blackout in February 2000. After tests
revealed that he had a malignant brain tumour, he decided to move to Brooklyn, to be close to
his youngest sister, Sameetah, who teaches at the Pratt Institute—a few blocks away from the
street where I live. Shahid ignored my reassurances. He began to laugh and it was then that I
realised that he was dead serious. I understood that he was entrusting me with a quite
specific charge: he wanted me to remember him not through the spoken recitatives of
memory and friendship, but through the written word. 
He knew that my instincts would have led me to search for reasons to avoid writing about his
death: I would have told myself that I was not a poet; that our friendship was of recent date;
that there were many others who knew him much better and would be writing from greater
understanding and knowledge. All this Shahid had guessed and he had decided to shut off
those routes while there was still time. ‘You must write about me.’ Finally, I said: ‘Shahid, I will:
I’ll do the best I can.’
SubQuestion No : 34
Q.34 What kind of person was Shahid Ali?

Option:
1. Forgetful
2. Full of life 
3. Dangerous 
4. Depressed
Comprehension:
Read the passage and answer the questions that follow.
The first time that Agha Shahid Ali spoke to me about his approaching death was on 25 April
2001. The conversation began routinely. I had telephoned to remind him that we had been
invited to a friend’s house for lunch. Although he had been under treatment for cancer for
some fourteen months, Shahid was still on his feet and perfectly lucid, except for occasional
lapses of memory. I heard him thumbing through his engagement book and then suddenly he
said: ‘Oh dear. I can’t see a thing.’ There was a brief pause and then he added: ‘I hope this
doesn’t mean that I’m dying...’ I did not know how to respond: his voice was completely at
odds with the content of what he had just said, light to the point of jocularity. I mumbled
something innocuous: ‘No Shahid — of course not. You’ll be fine.’ He cut me short. In a tone
of voice that was at once quizzical and direct, he said: ‘When it happens I hope you’ll write
something about me.’
I was shocked into silence and a long moment passed before I could bring myself to say the
things that people say on such occasions. ‘Shahid you’ll be fine; you have to be strong...’
From the window of my study I could see a corner of the building in which he lived, some
eight blocks away. It was just a few months since he moved there: he had been living a few
miles away, in Manhattan, when he had a sudden blackout in February 2000. After tests
revealed that he had a malignant brain tumour, he decided to move to Brooklyn, to be close to
his youngest sister, Sameetah, who teaches at the Pratt Institute—a few blocks away from the
street where I live. Shahid ignored my reassurances. He began to laugh and it was then that I
realised that he was dead serious. I understood that he was entrusting me with a quite
specific charge: he wanted me to remember him not through the spoken recitatives of
memory and friendship, but through the written word. 
He knew that my instincts would have led me to search for reasons to avoid writing about his
death: I would have told myself that I was not a poet; that our friendship was of recent date;
that there were many others who knew him much better and would be writing from greater
understanding and knowledge. All this Shahid had guessed and he had decided to shut off
those routes while there was still time. ‘You must write about me.’ Finally, I said: ‘Shahid, I will:
I’ll do the best I can.’
SubQuestion No : 35
Q.35 What disease was Shahid Ali suffering from?

Option:
1. Brain tumour
2. Blood cancer
3. Loss of memory
4. Blindness
Comprehension:
Read the passage and answer the questions that follow.
The Roman Empire covered a vast stretch of territory that included most of Europe as we
know it today and a large part of the Fertile Crescent and North Africa.
The Roman empire embraced a wealth of local cultures and languages; that women had a
stronger legal position then than they do in many countries today; but also that much of the
economy was run on slave labour, denying freedom to substantial numbers of persons. From
the fifth century onwards, the empire fell apart in the west but remained intact and
exceptionally prosperous in its eastern half.
Roman historians have a rich collection of sources to go on, which we can broadly divide into
three groups: (a) texts, (b) documents and (c) material remains. Textual sources include
letters, speeches, sermons, laws, and histories of the period written by contemporaries.
These were usually called ‘Annals’ because the narrative was constructed on a year-by-year
basis. Documentary sources include mainly inscriptions and papyri. Inscriptions were usually
cut on stone, so a large number survive, in both Greek and Latin. The ‘papyrus’ was a reedlike
plant that grew along the banks of the Nile in Egypt and was processed to produce sheets
of writing material that was very widely used in everyday life. Thousands of contracts,
accounts, letters and official documents survive ‘on papyrus’ and have been published by
scholarswho are called ‘papyrologists’. Material remains include a very wide assortment of
itemsthat mainly archaeologists discover (for example, through excavation and field survey),
for example, buildings, monuments and other kinds of structures, pottery, coins, mosaics,
even entire landscapes. Each of these sources can only tell us just so much about the past,
and combining them can be a fruitful exercise, but how well this is done depends on the
historian’s skill!
SubQuestion No : 36
Q.36 Which of these statements is NOT true?

Option:
1. Texts, documents and material remains were the main sources for the historians.
2. Inscriptions were carved in Greek and Latin.
3. Archaeologists make discoveries through excavations.
4. The Roman empire flourished longer in the west.
Comprehension:
Read the passage and answer the questions that follow.
The Roman Empire covered a vast stretch of territory that included most of Europe as we
know it today and a large part of the Fertile Crescent and North Africa.
The Roman empire embraced a wealth of local cultures and languages; that women had a
stronger legal position then than they do in many countries today; but also that much of the
economy was run on slave labour, denying freedom to substantial numbers of persons. From
the fifth century onwards, the empire fell apart in the west but remained intact and
exceptionally prosperous in its eastern half.
Roman historians have a rich collection of sources to go on, which we can broadly divide into
three groups: (a) texts, (b) documents and (c) material remains. Textual sources include
letters, speeches, sermons, laws, and histories of the period written by contemporaries.
These were usually called ‘Annals’ because the narrative was constructed on a year-by-year
basis. Documentary sources include mainly inscriptions and papyri. Inscriptions were usually
cut on stone, so a large number survive, in both Greek and Latin. The ‘papyrus’ was a reedlike
plant that grew along the banks of the Nile in Egypt and was processed to produce sheets
of writing material that was very widely used in everyday life. Thousands of contracts,
accounts, letters and official documents survive ‘on papyrus’ and have been published by
scholarswho are called ‘papyrologists’. Material remains include a very wide assortment of
itemsthat mainly archaeologists discover (for example, through excavation and field survey),
for example, buildings, monuments and other kinds of structures, pottery, coins, mosaics,
even entire landscapes. Each of these sources can only tell us just so much about the past,
and combining them can be a fruitful exercise, but how well this is done depends on the
historian’s skill!
SubQuestion No : 37
Q.37 Who were papyrologists?

Option:
1. People who processed papyrus into sheets
2. Scholars who published documents
3. Farmers who cultivated papyrus
4. People who surveyed the reed like plants along the Nile
Comprehension:
Read the passage and answer the questions that follow.
The Roman Empire covered a vast stretch of territory that included most of Europe as we
know it today and a large part of the Fertile Crescent and North Africa.
The Roman empire embraced a wealth of local cultures and languages; that women had a
stronger legal position then than they do in many countries today; but also that much of the
economy was run on slave labour, denying freedom to substantial numbers of persons. From
the fifth century onwards, the empire fell apart in the west but remained intact and
exceptionally prosperous in its eastern half.
Roman historians have a rich collection of sources to go on, which we can broadly divide into
three groups: (a) texts, (b) documents and (c) material remains. Textual sources include
letters, speeches, sermons, laws, and histories of the period written by contemporaries.
These were usually called ‘Annals’ because the narrative was constructed on a year-by-year
basis. Documentary sources include mainly inscriptions and papyri. Inscriptions were usually
cut on stone, so a large number survive, in both Greek and Latin. The ‘papyrus’ was a reedlike
plant that grew along the banks of the Nile in Egypt and was processed to produce sheets
of writing material that was very widely used in everyday life. Thousands of contracts,
accounts, letters and official documents survive ‘on papyrus’ and have been published by
scholarswho are called ‘papyrologists’. Material remains include a very wide assortment of
itemsthat mainly archaeologists discover (for example, through excavation and field survey),
for example, buildings, monuments and other kinds of structures, pottery, coins, mosaics,
even entire landscapes. Each of these sources can only tell us just so much about the past,
and combining them can be a fruitful exercise, but how well this is done depends on the
historian’s skill!
SubQuestion No : 38
Q.38 Much of the economy in the Roman empire was run on:

Option:
1. slave labour
2. scholars
3. women
4. archaeologists
Comprehension:
Read the passage and answer the questions that follow.
The Roman Empire covered a vast stretch of territory that included most of Europe as we
know it today and a large part of the Fertile Crescent and North Africa.
The Roman empire embraced a wealth of local cultures and languages; that women had a
stronger legal position then than they do in many countries today; but also that much of the
economy was run on slave labour, denying freedom to substantial numbers of persons. From
the fifth century onwards, the empire fell apart in the west but remained intact and
exceptionally prosperous in its eastern half.
Roman historians have a rich collection of sources to go on, which we can broadly divide into
three groups: (a) texts, (b) documents and (c) material remains. Textual sources include
letters, speeches, sermons, laws, and histories of the period written by contemporaries.
These were usually called ‘Annals’ because the narrative was constructed on a year-by-year
basis. Documentary sources include mainly inscriptions and papyri. Inscriptions were usually
cut on stone, so a large number survive, in both Greek and Latin. The ‘papyrus’ was a reedlike
plant that grew along the banks of the Nile in Egypt and was processed to produce sheets
of writing material that was very widely used in everyday life. Thousands of contracts,
accounts, letters and official documents survive ‘on papyrus’ and have been published by
scholarswho are called ‘papyrologists’. Material remains include a very wide assortment of
itemsthat mainly archaeologists discover (for example, through excavation and field survey),
for example, buildings, monuments and other kinds of structures, pottery, coins, mosaics,
even entire landscapes. Each of these sources can only tell us just so much about the past,
and combining them can be a fruitful exercise, but how well this is done depends on the
historian’s skill!
SubQuestion No : 39
Q.39 Documentary sources of the history of Roman empire include:

Option:
1. inscriptions
2. pottery
3. sermons
4. landscapes
Comprehension:
Read the passage and answer the questions that follow.
The Roman Empire covered a vast stretch of territory that included most of Europe as we
know it today and a large part of the Fertile Crescent and North Africa.
The Roman empire embraced a wealth of local cultures and languages; that women had a
stronger legal position then than they do in many countries today; but also that much of the
economy was run on slave labour, denying freedom to substantial numbers of persons. From
the fifth century onwards, the empire fell apart in the west but remained intact and
exceptionally prosperous in its eastern half.
Roman historians have a rich collection of sources to go on, which we can broadly divide into
three groups: (a) texts, (b) documents and (c) material remains. Textual sources include
letters, speeches, sermons, laws, and histories of the period written by contemporaries.
These were usually called ‘Annals’ because the narrative was constructed on a year-by-year
basis. Documentary sources include mainly inscriptions and papyri. Inscriptions were usually
cut on stone, so a large number survive, in both Greek and Latin. The ‘papyrus’ was a reedlike
plant that grew along the banks of the Nile in Egypt and was processed to produce sheets
of writing material that was very widely used in everyday life. Thousands of contracts,
accounts, letters and official documents survive ‘on papyrus’ and have been published by
scholarswho are called ‘papyrologists’. Material remains include a very wide assortment of
itemsthat mainly archaeologists discover (for example, through excavation and field survey),
for example, buildings, monuments and other kinds of structures, pottery, coins, mosaics,
even entire landscapes. Each of these sources can only tell us just so much about the past,
and combining them can be a fruitful exercise, but how well this is done depends on the
historian’s skill!
SubQuestion No : 40
Q.40 Which of these are NOT material remains?

Option:
1. Mosaics
2. Coins
3. Monuments
4. Annals
Comprehension:
Read the passage and answer the questions that follow. 
The drainage systems of India are mainly controlled by the broad relief features of the
subcontinent. Accordingly, the Indian rivers are divided into two major groups: the Himalayan
rivers; and the Peninsular rivers.
Apart from originating from the two major physiographic regions of India, the Himalayan and
the Peninsular rivers are different from each other in many ways. Most of the Himalayan rivers
are perennial. It means that they have water throughout the year. These rivers receive water
from rain as well as from melted snow from the lofty mountains. The major Himalayan rivers
are the Indus, the Ganga and the Brahmaputra. These rivers are long, and are joined by
many large and important tributaries. A river along with its tributaries may be called a river
system. The two major Himalayan rivers, the Indus and the Brahmaputra originate from the
north of the mountain ranges. They cut through the mountains making gorges in the upper
course. The perennial Himalayan rivers have long courses from their source to the sea. They
perform intensive erosional activity in their upper courses and carry huge loads of silt and
sand with their swift current. In the middle and the lower courses, these rivers form meanders,
oxbow lakes, levees and many other depositional features in their floodplains as their speed
slackens. They also have well developed deltas.
A large number of the Peninsular rivers like the Godavari, Kaveri and Krishna are seasonal,
as their flow is dependent on rainfall. During the dry season when it doesn’t rain, even the
large rivers have reduced flow of water in their channels. The Peninsular rivers have shorter
and shallower courses as compared to their Himalayan counterparts. However, some of them
originate in the central highlands and flow towards the west. Most of the rivers of peninsular
India originate in the Western Ghats and flow towards the Bay of Bengal.
SubQuestion No : 41
Q.41 The word ‘seasonal’ rivers in the passage means:

Option:
1. rivers that never go dry in any season
2. rivers whose flow is dependent upon rainfall
3. rivers that change their course in every season
4. rivers that flood in every season
Comprehension:
Read the passage and answer the questions that follow. 
The drainage systems of India are mainly controlled by the broad relief features of the
subcontinent. Accordingly, the Indian rivers are divided into two major groups: the Himalayan
rivers; and the Peninsular rivers.
Apart from originating from the two major physiographic regions of India, the Himalayan and
the Peninsular rivers are different from each other in many ways. Most of the Himalayan rivers
are perennial. It means that they have water throughout the year. These rivers receive water
from rain as well as from melted snow from the lofty mountains. The major Himalayan rivers
are the Indus, the Ganga and the Brahmaputra. These rivers are long, and are joined by
many large and important tributaries. A river along with its tributaries may be called a river
system. The two major Himalayan rivers, the Indus and the Brahmaputra originate from the
north of the mountain ranges. They cut through the mountains making gorges in the upper
course. The perennial Himalayan rivers have long courses from their source to the sea. They
perform intensive erosional activity in their upper courses and carry huge loads of silt and
sand with their swift current. In the middle and the lower courses, these rivers form meanders,
oxbow lakes, levees and many other depositional features in their floodplains as their speed
slackens. They also have well developed deltas.
A large number of the Peninsular rivers like the Godavari, Kaveri and Krishna are seasonal,
as their flow is dependent on rainfall. During the dry season when it doesn’t rain, even the
large rivers have reduced flow of water in their channels. The Peninsular rivers have shorter
and shallower courses as compared to their Himalayan counterparts. However, some of them
originate in the central highlands and flow towards the west. Most of the rivers of peninsular
India originate in the Western Ghats and flow towards the Bay of Bengal.
SubQuestion No : 42
Q.42 Which of these is NOT a Himalayan river?

Option:
1. Indus
2. Godavari
3. Ganga
4. Brahmaputra
Comprehension:
Read the passage and answer the questions that follow. 
The drainage systems of India are mainly controlled by the broad relief features of the
subcontinent. Accordingly, the Indian rivers are divided into two major groups: the Himalayan
rivers; and the Peninsular rivers.
Apart from originating from the two major physiographic regions of India, the Himalayan and
the Peninsular rivers are different from each other in many ways. Most of the Himalayan rivers
are perennial. It means that they have water throughout the year. These rivers receive water
from rain as well as from melted snow from the lofty mountains. The major Himalayan rivers
are the Indus, the Ganga and the Brahmaputra. These rivers are long, and are joined by
many large and important tributaries. A river along with its tributaries may be called a river
system. The two major Himalayan rivers, the Indus and the Brahmaputra originate from the
north of the mountain ranges. They cut through the mountains making gorges in the upper
course. The perennial Himalayan rivers have long courses from their source to the sea. They
perform intensive erosional activity in their upper courses and carry huge loads of silt and
sand with their swift current. In the middle and the lower courses, these rivers form meanders,
oxbow lakes, levees and many other depositional features in their floodplains as their speed
slackens. They also have well developed deltas.
A large number of the Peninsular rivers like the Godavari, Kaveri and Krishna are seasonal,
as their flow is dependent on rainfall. During the dry season when it doesn’t rain, even the
large rivers have reduced flow of water in their channels. The Peninsular rivers have shorter
and shallower courses as compared to their Himalayan counterparts. However, some of them
originate in the central highlands and flow towards the west. Most of the rivers of peninsular
India originate in the Western Ghats and flow towards the Bay of Bengal.
SubQuestion No : 43
Q.43 Himalayan rivers are never dry because they:

Option:
1. have a shorter and shallower course
2. are dependent on rainfall only
3. are fed by glaciers and rainfall
4. originate in the Western Ghats
Comprehension:
Read the passage and answer the questions that follow. 
The drainage systems of India are mainly controlled by the broad relief features of the
subcontinent. Accordingly, the Indian rivers are divided into two major groups: the Himalayan
rivers; and the Peninsular rivers.
Apart from originating from the two major physiographic regions of India, the Himalayan and
the Peninsular rivers are different from each other in many ways. Most of the Himalayan rivers
are perennial. It means that they have water throughout the year. These rivers receive water
from rain as well as from melted snow from the lofty mountains. The major Himalayan rivers
are the Indus, the Ganga and the Brahmaputra. These rivers are long, and are joined by
many large and important tributaries. A river along with its tributaries may be called a river
system. The two major Himalayan rivers, the Indus and the Brahmaputra originate from the
north of the mountain ranges. They cut through the mountains making gorges in the upper
course. The perennial Himalayan rivers have long courses from their source to the sea. They
perform intensive erosional activity in their upper courses and carry huge loads of silt and
sand with their swift current. In the middle and the lower courses, these rivers form meanders,
oxbow lakes, levees and many other depositional features in their floodplains as their speed
slackens. They also have well developed deltas.
A large number of the Peninsular rivers like the Godavari, Kaveri and Krishna are seasonal,
as their flow is dependent on rainfall. During the dry season when it doesn’t rain, even the
large rivers have reduced flow of water in their channels. The Peninsular rivers have shorter
and shallower courses as compared to their Himalayan counterparts. However, some of them
originate in the central highlands and flow towards the west. Most of the rivers of peninsular
India originate in the Western Ghats and flow towards the Bay of Bengal.
SubQuestion No : 44
Q.44 The drainage systems of India are controlled by:

Option:
1. relief features
2. erosional activity
3. tributaries of rivers
4. depositional features 
Comprehension:
Read the passage and answer the questions that follow. 
The drainage systems of India are mainly controlled by the broad relief features of the
subcontinent. Accordingly, the Indian rivers are divided into two major groups: the Himalayan
rivers; and the Peninsular rivers.
Apart from originating from the two major physiographic regions of India, the Himalayan and
the Peninsular rivers are different from each other in many ways. Most of the Himalayan rivers
are perennial. It means that they have water throughout the year. These rivers receive water
from rain as well as from melted snow from the lofty mountains. The major Himalayan rivers
are the Indus, the Ganga and the Brahmaputra. These rivers are long, and are joined by
many large and important tributaries. A river along with its tributaries may be called a river
system. The two major Himalayan rivers, the Indus and the Brahmaputra originate from the
north of the mountain ranges. They cut through the mountains making gorges in the upper
course. The perennial Himalayan rivers have long courses from their source to the sea. They
perform intensive erosional activity in their upper courses and carry huge loads of silt and
sand with their swift current. In the middle and the lower courses, these rivers form meanders,
oxbow lakes, levees and many other depositional features in their floodplains as their speed
slackens. They also have well developed deltas.
A large number of the Peninsular rivers like the Godavari, Kaveri and Krishna are seasonal,
as their flow is dependent on rainfall. During the dry season when it doesn’t rain, even the
large rivers have reduced flow of water in their channels. The Peninsular rivers have shorter
and shallower courses as compared to their Himalayan counterparts. However, some of them
originate in the central highlands and flow towards the west. Most of the rivers of peninsular
India originate in the Western Ghats and flow towards the Bay of Bengal.
SubQuestion No : 45
Q.45 ‘Slackened speed’ suggests:

Option:
1. average speed
2. tremendous speed
3. maximum speed
4. reduced speed
Comprehension:
Read the passage and answer the questions that follow. 
The drainage systems of India are mainly controlled by the broad relief features of the
subcontinent. Accordingly, the Indian rivers are divided into two major groups: the Himalayan
rivers; and the Peninsular rivers.
Apart from originating from the two major physiographic regions of India, the Himalayan and
the Peninsular rivers are different from each other in many ways. Most of the Himalayan rivers
are perennial. It means that they have water throughout the year. These rivers receive water
from rain as well as from melted snow from the lofty mountains. The major Himalayan rivers
are the Indus, the Ganga and the Brahmaputra. These rivers are long, and are joined by
many large and important tributaries. A river along with its tributaries may be called a river
system. The two major Himalayan rivers, the Indus and the Brahmaputra originate from the
north of the mountain ranges. They cut through the mountains making gorges in the upper
course. The perennial Himalayan rivers have long courses from their source to the sea. They
perform intensive erosional activity in their upper courses and carry huge loads of silt and
sand with their swift current. In the middle and the lower courses, these rivers form meanders,
oxbow lakes, levees and many other depositional features in their floodplains as their speed
slackens. They also have well developed deltas.
A large number of the Peninsular rivers like the Godavari, Kaveri and Krishna are seasonal,
as their flow is dependent on rainfall. During the dry season when it doesn’t rain, even the
large rivers have reduced flow of water in their channels. The Peninsular rivers have shorter
and shallower courses as compared to their Himalayan counterparts. However, some of them
originate in the central highlands and flow towards the west. Most of the rivers of peninsular
India originate in the Western Ghats and flow towards the Bay of Bengal.
SubQuestion No : 46
Q.46 Which of these is NOT a depositional feature found in the lower course of a river?

Option:
1. Levee
2. Gorge
3. Oxbow lake
4. Meander
Comprehension:
Read the passage and answer the questions that follow. 
The drainage systems of India are mainly controlled by the broad relief features of the
subcontinent. Accordingly, the Indian rivers are divided into two major groups: the Himalayan
rivers; and the Peninsular rivers.
Apart from originating from the two major physiographic regions of India, the Himalayan and
the Peninsular rivers are different from each other in many ways. Most of the Himalayan rivers
are perennial. It means that they have water throughout the year. These rivers receive water
from rain as well as from melted snow from the lofty mountains. The major Himalayan rivers
are the Indus, the Ganga and the Brahmaputra. These rivers are long, and are joined by
many large and important tributaries. A river along with its tributaries may be called a river
system. The two major Himalayan rivers, the Indus and the Brahmaputra originate from the
north of the mountain ranges. They cut through the mountains making gorges in the upper
course. The perennial Himalayan rivers have long courses from their source to the sea. They
perform intensive erosional activity in their upper courses and carry huge loads of silt and
sand with their swift current. In the middle and the lower courses, these rivers form meanders,
oxbow lakes, levees and many other depositional features in their floodplains as their speed
slackens. They also have well developed deltas.
A large number of the Peninsular rivers like the Godavari, Kaveri and Krishna are seasonal,
as their flow is dependent on rainfall. During the dry season when it doesn’t rain, even the
large rivers have reduced flow of water in their channels. The Peninsular rivers have shorter
and shallower courses as compared to their Himalayan counterparts. However, some of them
originate in the central highlands and flow towards the west. Most of the rivers of peninsular
India originate in the Western Ghats and flow towards the Bay of Bengal.
SubQuestion No : 47
Q.47 ‘Perennial’ rivers mean:

Option:
1. receiving water from the rains
2. those that originate in the mountains
3. rivers with a long course
4. full of water throughout the year
Comprehension:
Read the passage and answer the questions that follow. 
The drainage systems of India are mainly controlled by the broad relief features of the
subcontinent. Accordingly, the Indian rivers are divided into two major groups: the Himalayan
rivers; and the Peninsular rivers.
Apart from originating from the two major physiographic regions of India, the Himalayan and
the Peninsular rivers are different from each other in many ways. Most of the Himalayan rivers
are perennial. It means that they have water throughout the year. These rivers receive water
from rain as well as from melted snow from the lofty mountains. The major Himalayan rivers
are the Indus, the Ganga and the Brahmaputra. These rivers are long, and are joined by
many large and important tributaries. A river along with its tributaries may be called a river
system. The two major Himalayan rivers, the Indus and the Brahmaputra originate from the
north of the mountain ranges. They cut through the mountains making gorges in the upper
course. The perennial Himalayan rivers have long courses from their source to the sea. They
perform intensive erosional activity in their upper courses and carry huge loads of silt and
sand with their swift current. In the middle and the lower courses, these rivers form meanders,
oxbow lakes, levees and many other depositional features in their floodplains as their speed
slackens. They also have well developed deltas.
A large number of the Peninsular rivers like the Godavari, Kaveri and Krishna are seasonal,
as their flow is dependent on rainfall. During the dry season when it doesn’t rain, even the
large rivers have reduced flow of water in their channels. The Peninsular rivers have shorter
and shallower courses as compared to their Himalayan counterparts. However, some of them
originate in the central highlands and flow towards the west. Most of the rivers of peninsular
India originate in the Western Ghats and flow towards the Bay of Bengal.
SubQuestion No : 48
Q.48 Erosional activity takes place in the upper course of the river because of:

Option:
1. the reduced flow of water
2. huge loads of silt and sand
3. the great speed of water
4. the presence of flood plains
Comprehension:
Read the passage and answer the questions that follow. 
The drainage systems of India are mainly controlled by the broad relief features of the
subcontinent. Accordingly, the Indian rivers are divided into two major groups: the Himalayan
rivers; and the Peninsular rivers.
Apart from originating from the two major physiographic regions of India, the Himalayan and
the Peninsular rivers are different from each other in many ways. Most of the Himalayan rivers
are perennial. It means that they have water throughout the year. These rivers receive water
from rain as well as from melted snow from the lofty mountains. The major Himalayan rivers
are the Indus, the Ganga and the Brahmaputra. These rivers are long, and are joined by
many large and important tributaries. A river along with its tributaries may be called a river
system. The two major Himalayan rivers, the Indus and the Brahmaputra originate from the
north of the mountain ranges. They cut through the mountains making gorges in the upper
course. The perennial Himalayan rivers have long courses from their source to the sea. They
perform intensive erosional activity in their upper courses and carry huge loads of silt and
sand with their swift current. In the middle and the lower courses, these rivers form meanders,
oxbow lakes, levees and many other depositional features in their floodplains as their speed
slackens. They also have well developed deltas.
A large number of the Peninsular rivers like the Godavari, Kaveri and Krishna are seasonal,
as their flow is dependent on rainfall. During the dry season when it doesn’t rain, even the
large rivers have reduced flow of water in their channels. The Peninsular rivers have shorter
and shallower courses as compared to their Himalayan counterparts. However, some of them
originate in the central highlands and flow towards the west. Most of the rivers of peninsular
India originate in the Western Ghats and flow towards the Bay of Bengal.
SubQuestion No : 49
Q.49 A river along with its tributaries may be called a:

Option:
1. highland
2. river system
3. peninsula
4. flood plain
Comprehension:
Read the passage and answer the questions that follow. 
The drainage systems of India are mainly controlled by the broad relief features of the
subcontinent. Accordingly, the Indian rivers are divided into two major groups: the Himalayan
rivers; and the Peninsular rivers.
Apart from originating from the two major physiographic regions of India, the Himalayan and
the Peninsular rivers are different from each other in many ways. Most of the Himalayan rivers
are perennial. It means that they have water throughout the year. These rivers receive water
from rain as well as from melted snow from the lofty mountains. The major Himalayan rivers
are the Indus, the Ganga and the Brahmaputra. These rivers are long, and are joined by
many large and important tributaries. A river along with its tributaries may be called a river
system. The two major Himalayan rivers, the Indus and the Brahmaputra originate from the
north of the mountain ranges. They cut through the mountains making gorges in the upper
course. The perennial Himalayan rivers have long courses from their source to the sea. They
perform intensive erosional activity in their upper courses and carry huge loads of silt and
sand with their swift current. In the middle and the lower courses, these rivers form meanders,
oxbow lakes, levees and many other depositional features in their floodplains as their speed
slackens. They also have well developed deltas.
A large number of the Peninsular rivers like the Godavari, Kaveri and Krishna are seasonal,
as their flow is dependent on rainfall. During the dry season when it doesn’t rain, even the
large rivers have reduced flow of water in their channels. The Peninsular rivers have shorter
and shallower courses as compared to their Himalayan counterparts. However, some of them
originate in the central highlands and flow towards the west. Most of the rivers of peninsular
India originate in the Western Ghats and flow towards the Bay of Bengal.
SubQuestion No : 50
Q.50 Which of these statements is NOT true about perennial rivers?

Option:
1. They have a very short dry season.
2. They cover very long distances till they reach the sea.
3. Most of them originate in the Himalayas.
4. They have well developed deltas.
Comprehension:
Read the passage and answer the questions that follow.
Cambridge was my metaphor for England, and it was strange that when I left it had become
altogether something else, because I had met Stephen Hawking there. It was on a walking
tour through Cambridge that the guide mentioned Stephen Hawking, ‘poor man, who is quite
disabled now, though he is a worthy successor to Isaac Newton, whose chair he has at the
university.’ And I started, because I had quite forgotten that this most brilliant and completely
paralysed astrophysicist, (scholar of astrophysics — branch of physics dealing with stars,
planets, etc.) the author of A Brief History of Time, one of the biggest best-sellers ever, lived
here. When the walking tour was done, I rushed to a phone booth and, almost tearing the
cord so it could reach me outside, phoned Stephen Hawking’s house. There was his assistant
on the line and I told him I had come in a wheelchair from India (perhaps he thought I had
propelled myself all the way) to write about my travels in Britain. I had to see Professor
Hawking — even ten minutes would do. “Half an hour,” he said. “From three-thirty to four.”
And suddenly I felt weak all over. Growing up disabled, you get fed up with people asking you
to be brave, as if you have a courage account on which you are too lazy to draw a cheque.
The only thing that makes you stronger is seeing somebody like you, achieving something
huge. Then you know how much is possible and you reach out further than you ever thought
you could. “I haven’t been brave,” said his disembodied computer-voice, the next afternoon.
“I’ve had no choice.” Surely, I wanted to say, living creatively with the reality of his
disintegrating body was a choice? But I kept quiet, because I felt guilty every time I spoke to
him, forcing him to respond. There he was, tapping at the little switch in his hand, trying to find
the words on his computer with the only bit of movement left to him, his long, pale fingers.
Every so often, his eyes would shut in frustrated exhaustion. And sitting opposite him I could
feel his anguish, the mind buoyant with thoughts that came out in frozen phrases and
sentences stiff as corpses.
SubQuestion No : 51
Q.51 Which of these facts is NOT true about Stephen Hawking?

Option:
1. A worthy contemporary of Newton
2. A professor at Cambridge
3. A brilliant astrophysicist
4. A paralysed man
Comprehension:
Read the passage and answer the questions that follow.
Cambridge was my metaphor for England, and it was strange that when I left it had become
altogether something else, because I had met Stephen Hawking there. It was on a walking
tour through Cambridge that the guide mentioned Stephen Hawking, ‘poor man, who is quite
disabled now, though he is a worthy successor to Isaac Newton, whose chair he has at the
university.’ And I started, because I had quite forgotten that this most brilliant and completely
paralysed astrophysicist, (scholar of astrophysics — branch of physics dealing with stars,
planets, etc.) the author of A Brief History of Time, one of the biggest best-sellers ever, lived
here. When the walking tour was done, I rushed to a phone booth and, almost tearing the
cord so it could reach me outside, phoned Stephen Hawking’s house. There was his assistant
on the line and I told him I had come in a wheelchair from India (perhaps he thought I had
propelled myself all the way) to write about my travels in Britain. I had to see Professor
Hawking — even ten minutes would do. “Half an hour,” he said. “From three-thirty to four.”
And suddenly I felt weak all over. Growing up disabled, you get fed up with people asking you
to be brave, as if you have a courage account on which you are too lazy to draw a cheque.
The only thing that makes you stronger is seeing somebody like you, achieving something
huge. Then you know how much is possible and you reach out further than you ever thought
you could. “I haven’t been brave,” said his disembodied computer-voice, the next afternoon.
“I’ve had no choice.” Surely, I wanted to say, living creatively with the reality of his
disintegrating body was a choice? But I kept quiet, because I felt guilty every time I spoke to
him, forcing him to respond. There he was, tapping at the little switch in his hand, trying to find
the words on his computer with the only bit of movement left to him, his long, pale fingers.
Every so often, his eyes would shut in frustrated exhaustion. And sitting opposite him I could
feel his anguish, the mind buoyant with thoughts that came out in frozen phrases and
sentences stiff as corpses.
SubQuestion No : 52
Q.52 The narrator pulled the telephone cord outside the phone booth because he was:

Option:
1. not able to hear clearly in the booth
2. desperate to get an appointment with Stephen Hawking
3. unable to enter the booth on a wheelchair
4. eager to call Stephen Hawking’s home
Comprehension:
Read the passage and answer the questions that follow.
Cambridge was my metaphor for England, and it was strange that when I left it had become
altogether something else, because I had met Stephen Hawking there. It was on a walking
tour through Cambridge that the guide mentioned Stephen Hawking, ‘poor man, who is quite
disabled now, though he is a worthy successor to Isaac Newton, whose chair he has at the
university.’ And I started, because I had quite forgotten that this most brilliant and completely
paralysed astrophysicist, (scholar of astrophysics — branch of physics dealing with stars,
planets, etc.) the author of A Brief History of Time, one of the biggest best-sellers ever, lived
here. When the walking tour was done, I rushed to a phone booth and, almost tearing the
cord so it could reach me outside, phoned Stephen Hawking’s house. There was his assistant
on the line and I told him I had come in a wheelchair from India (perhaps he thought I had
propelled myself all the way) to write about my travels in Britain. I had to see Professor
Hawking — even ten minutes would do. “Half an hour,” he said. “From three-thirty to four.”
And suddenly I felt weak all over. Growing up disabled, you get fed up with people asking you
to be brave, as if you have a courage account on which you are too lazy to draw a cheque.
The only thing that makes you stronger is seeing somebody like you, achieving something
huge. Then you know how much is possible and you reach out further than you ever thought
you could. “I haven’t been brave,” said his disembodied computer-voice, the next afternoon.
“I’ve had no choice.” Surely, I wanted to say, living creatively with the reality of his
disintegrating body was a choice? But I kept quiet, because I felt guilty every time I spoke to
him, forcing him to respond. There he was, tapping at the little switch in his hand, trying to find
the words on his computer with the only bit of movement left to him, his long, pale fingers.
Every so often, his eyes would shut in frustrated exhaustion. And sitting opposite him I could
feel his anguish, the mind buoyant with thoughts that came out in frozen phrases and
sentences stiff as corpses.
SubQuestion No : 53
Q.53 Complete the sentence to make it true. The narrator:

Option:
1. is the author of A Brief History of Time
2. dislikes people asking him to be brave
3. came to Britain to study astrophysics
4. met Stephen Hawking accidently
Comprehension:
Read the passage and answer the questions that follow.
Cambridge was my metaphor for England, and it was strange that when I left it had become
altogether something else, because I had met Stephen Hawking there. It was on a walking
tour through Cambridge that the guide mentioned Stephen Hawking, ‘poor man, who is quite
disabled now, though he is a worthy successor to Isaac Newton, whose chair he has at the
university.’ And I started, because I had quite forgotten that this most brilliant and completely
paralysed astrophysicist, (scholar of astrophysics — branch of physics dealing with stars,
planets, etc.) the author of A Brief History of Time, one of the biggest best-sellers ever, lived
here. When the walking tour was done, I rushed to a phone booth and, almost tearing the
cord so it could reach me outside, phoned Stephen Hawking’s house. There was his assistant
on the line and I told him I had come in a wheelchair from India (perhaps he thought I had
propelled myself all the way) to write about my travels in Britain. I had to see Professor
Hawking — even ten minutes would do. “Half an hour,” he said. “From three-thirty to four.”
And suddenly I felt weak all over. Growing up disabled, you get fed up with people asking you
to be brave, as if you have a courage account on which you are too lazy to draw a cheque.
The only thing that makes you stronger is seeing somebody like you, achieving something
huge. Then you know how much is possible and you reach out further than you ever thought
you could. “I haven’t been brave,” said his disembodied computer-voice, the next afternoon.
“I’ve had no choice.” Surely, I wanted to say, living creatively with the reality of his
disintegrating body was a choice? But I kept quiet, because I felt guilty every time I spoke to
him, forcing him to respond. There he was, tapping at the little switch in his hand, trying to find
the words on his computer with the only bit of movement left to him, his long, pale fingers.
Every so often, his eyes would shut in frustrated exhaustion. And sitting opposite him I could
feel his anguish, the mind buoyant with thoughts that came out in frozen phrases and
sentences stiff as corpses.
SubQuestion No : 54
Q.54 The narrator felt the professor’s anguish in:

Option:
1. his effort to put up a brave front
2. the extreme exhaustion in his face
3. the loss of movement in his legs
4. his inability to express his thoughts in words
Comprehension:
Read the passage and answer the questions that follow.
Cambridge was my metaphor for England, and it was strange that when I left it had become
altogether something else, because I had met Stephen Hawking there. It was on a walking
tour through Cambridge that the guide mentioned Stephen Hawking, ‘poor man, who is quite
disabled now, though he is a worthy successor to Isaac Newton, whose chair he has at the
university.’ And I started, because I had quite forgotten that this most brilliant and completely
paralysed astrophysicist, (scholar of astrophysics — branch of physics dealing with stars,
planets, etc.) the author of A Brief History of Time, one of the biggest best-sellers ever, lived
here. When the walking tour was done, I rushed to a phone booth and, almost tearing the
cord so it could reach me outside, phoned Stephen Hawking’s house. There was his assistant
on the line and I told him I had come in a wheelchair from India (perhaps he thought I had
propelled myself all the way) to write about my travels in Britain. I had to see Professor
Hawking — even ten minutes would do. “Half an hour,” he said. “From three-thirty to four.”
And suddenly I felt weak all over. Growing up disabled, you get fed up with people asking you
to be brave, as if you have a courage account on which you are too lazy to draw a cheque.
The only thing that makes you stronger is seeing somebody like you, achieving something
huge. Then you know how much is possible and you reach out further than you ever thought
you could. “I haven’t been brave,” said his disembodied computer-voice, the next afternoon.
“I’ve had no choice.” Surely, I wanted to say, living creatively with the reality of his
disintegrating body was a choice? But I kept quiet, because I felt guilty every time I spoke to
him, forcing him to respond. There he was, tapping at the little switch in his hand, trying to find
the words on his computer with the only bit of movement left to him, his long, pale fingers.
Every so often, his eyes would shut in frustrated exhaustion. And sitting opposite him I could
feel his anguish, the mind buoyant with thoughts that came out in frozen phrases and
sentences stiff as corpses.
SubQuestion No : 55
Q.55 Astrophysics deals with:

Option:
1. stars and planets
2. creative writing
3. diseases
4. computers 
Q.56 Select the correct passive form of the given sentence. 
May you achieve success in all your endeavours.

Option:
1. May success will be achieved by you in all your endeavours.
2. Success might be achieved by you in all your endeavours.
3. May success be achieved by you in all your endeavours.
4. Success has been achieved by you in all your endeavours.
Q.57 Select the most appropriate option to improve the underlined segment in the given
sentence. If there is no need to improve it, select ‘No improvement’. 
He is bent to harm my reputation by false accusations.

Option:
1. bent on harming
2. bent to harming
3. bend to harm
4. No improvement
Q.58 Select the most appropriate meaning of the given idiom. 
Do a good turn

Option:
1. Render a service
2. Wait for a turn
3. Return a gift
4. Make a profit
Q.59 Select the correct active form of the given sentence. 
By whom has this mischief been done?

Option:
1. Who has been doing this mischief?
2. Who did this mischief?
3. Who has done this mischief?
4. Who is doing this mischief?
Q.60 Given below are four sentences in jumbled order. Pick the option that gives their
correct order. 

A. Combining Vitamins A, C and D3 with Zinc and Probiotics gives a good flu-fighting remedy.
B. Vitamin C plays a vital role in maintaining the body’s natural defence.
C. It also supports a healthy immune system.
D. People with low vitamin C are at a much greater risk of getting infections.

Option:
1. BCDA
2. ADCB
3. BADC
4. DCBA
Q.61 Identify the segment in the sentence which contains a grammatical error. 
The girl besides you in high heels is my younger sister.

Option:
1. younger sister
2. in high heels
3. is my
4. The girl besides you
Q.62 Select the most appropriate option to improve the underlined segment in the given
sentence. If there is no need to improve it, select ‘No improvement’. 
Each one of them were wearing a face mask for protection.

Option:
1. No improvement
2. was wearing
3. were worn
4. have worn
Q.63 Identify the segment in the sentence which contains a grammatical error. 
I looked him at the eye and told him all I knew.

Option:
1. at the eye 
2. I looked him
3. and told him
4. all I knew
Q.64 Select the correct direct form of the given sentence. 
He told me not to jump to any conclusion.

Option:
1. He said to me, “Not jump to any conclusion.”
2. He said to me, “Don’t jump to any conclusion.”
3. He told to me, “Don’t jump to any conclusion.”
4. He said to me, “Not to jump to any conclusion.”
Q.65 Select the most appropriate option to improve the underlined segment in the given
sentence. If there is no need to improve it, select ‘No improvement’. 
I wouldn’t dream to raise the price.

Option:
1. to raising
2. to rise
3. No improvement
4. of raising
Q.66 Select the most appropriate option to improve the underlined segment in the given
sentence. If there is no need to improve it, select ‘No improvement’. 
But for their valour, they would have been defeated.

Option:
1. Except with their
2. But about their
3. No improvement
4. Because of their
Q.67 Given below are four sentences in jumbled order. Pick the option that gives their
correct order. 

A. Sometimes he even prescribed remedies for ailing pets.
B. Raghav owned a small pet shop.
C. He also dealt in fish food and bird seed.
D. He sold cats, dogs, birds and fish in his shop.

Option:
1. DABC
2. BDCA
3. CBAD
4. ACDB
Q.68 Select the most appropriate one word substitution for the given words. 
A state governed by old people

Option:
1. Autocracy
2. Bureaucracy
3. Democracy
4. Gerontocracy
Q.69 Select the correct passive form of the given sentence.
We have finalised the site for our new factory.

Option:
1. The site for our new factory is finalised by us.
2. The site for our new factory have been finalised by us.
3. The site for our new factory has been finalised by us.
4. The site for our new factory had been finalised by us.
Q.70 Select the correct indirect form of the given sentence. 
“Please wait for me at the coffee shop in case I am late,” said Reema to her friend.

Option:
1. Reema told her friend to wait for her at the coffee shop in case she was late.
2. Reema told her friend wait for me at the coffee shop in case I am late.
3. Reema told her friend to wait for her at the coffee shop in case I am late.
4. Reema told to her friend wait for her at the coffee shop in case she were late.
Q.71 Select the most appropriate one-word substitution for the given words. 
Obsessive desire to lose weight by refusing to eat

Option:
1. Asphyxia
2. Anorexia
3. Pyrexia
4. Dyslexia
Q.72 Select the most appropriate option to improve the underlined segment in the given
sentence. If there is no need to improve it, select ‘No improvement’. 
She was smiling but looking pleased about something.

Option:
1. and looked
2. but look
3. so looking
4. No improvement
Q.73 Select the correct indirect form of the given sentence. 
The little girl said, “This bicycle is mine.”

Option:
1. The little girl said that bicycle was her.
2. The little girl said that this bicycle is mine.
3. The little girl said that this bicycle is hers.
4. The little girl said that that bicycle was hers.
Q.74 Select the correct direct form of the given sentence. 
Father asked her if there was anything else she wished for.

Option:
1. Father said to her, “Is there anything else she had wished for?” 
2. Father said to her, “There was anything else you wished for?” 
3. Father said to her, “Is there anything else you wish for?” 
4. Father said to her, “Was there anything else she wished for?” 
Q.75 Select the most appropriate synonym of the given word. 
ACCURATELY

Option:
1. Partially
2. Moderately
3. Correctly
4. Promptly
Q.76 Select the correct active form of the given sentence. 
The bitter pills were swallowed by her with warm water.

Option:
1. She swallowed the bitter pills with warm water.
2. She swallows the bitter pills with warm water.
3. She has swallowed the bitter pills with warm water.
4. She swallows the warm water with the bitter pills.
Q.77 Select the most appropriate option to improve the underlined segment in the given
sentence. If there is no need to improve it, select ‘No improvement’. 
Only one of these books belong to the school library.

Option:
1. No improvement
2. these books belongs
3. this book belong
4. these book belongs
Q.78 Select the misspelt word.
Option:
1. Souvenir
2. Paltry
3. Afliction
4. Thwart
Q.79 Select the most appropriate option to fill in the blank. 
He is an honest man and his conduct is ______ suspicion.

Option:
1. over
2. below
3. above
4. against
Q.80 Select the correct direct form of the given sentence. 
The man said that he had been walking down the road with his guide dog.

Option:
1. The man said, “He were walking down the road with his guide dog.”
2. The man said, “I am walking down the road with my guide dog.”
3. The man said, “I walked down the road with his guide dog.”
4. The man said, “I was walking down the road with my guide dog.”
Q.81 Select the most appropriate meaning of the given idiom. 
Blow one’s own trumpet

Option:
1. Rely on oneself
2. Criticise others
3. Praise oneself
4. Respect others
Q.82 Select the most appropriate option to improve the underlined segment in the given
sentence. If there is no need to improve it, select ‘No improvement’. 
Chillies have a strong, spicy taste that tingle your taste buds.

Option:
1. which tingle
2. who is tingling
3. No improvement
4. that tingles
Q.83 Select the most appropriate option to fill in the blank. 
There ______ no porters on the platform, he had to carry his luggage himself.

Option:
1. being
2. been
3. having
4. going
Q.84 Select the most appropriate meaning of the given idiom. 
Option:
1. From the past
2. In the future
3. In all possible ways
4. In all directions
Q.85 Select the correct direct form of the given sentence. 
I prayed that his mother might recover soon.

Option:
1. I said, “May your mother recover soon!”
2. I said, “Might his mother soon recover.”
3. I said, “Oh God! Your mother may recover soon.”
4. I say, “Your mother may recover soon.”
Q.86 Given below are four sentences in jumbled order. Pick the option that gives their
correct order. 

A. That is why, when a person shows off we say, ‘as vain as a peacock’.
B. It gives us the impression of being a very proud bird.
C. But the fact is that the peacock is not vain, it displays its plumage to attract the peahen.
D. When the peacock dances, it spreads its feathers. 

Option:
1. CABD 
2. DACB
3. DBAC
4. BCDA
Q.87 Select the correct direct form of the given sentence. 
He welcomed me and requested me to be seated.

Option:
1. He said to me, “Welcome and sit down.”
2. He said to me, “Welcome. Please be seated.”
3. He said to me, “Welcome. Please to be seated.”
4. He said to me, “Be welcome. Please sit.”
Q.88 Select the correct indirect form of the given sentence. 
The teacher said to Anu, “I am very disappointed with your work.”

Option:
1. The teacher said that Anu I am very disappointed with your work.
2. The teacher told Anu that she was very disappointed with her work.
3. The teacher told Anu that she were very disappointed with her work.
4. The teacher told Anu that I was very disappointed with her work.
Q.89 Select the most appropriate one word substitution for the given words.
A glass container in which fish can be kept

Option:
1. Fishery
2. Aquarium
3. Aquatic
4. Aqua
Q.90 Select the most appropriate option to improve the underlined segment in the given
sentence. If there is no need to improve it, select ‘No improvement’. 
He turned a deaf ear on the advices of his parents.

Option:
1. No improvement
2. to the advice
3. at the advices
4. on the advice
Q.91 Select the misspelt word.
Option:
1.  Release
2. Arrivel
3. Plight
4. Obscure
Q.92 Select the correct indirect form of the given sentence. 
“Oh no! We have missed the flight,” she said.

Option:
1. She exclaimed that we had missed the flight.
2. She was sorry that they missed the flight.
3. She cried that we have missed the flight.
4. She regretted that they had missed the flight.
Q.93 Select the correct indirect form of the given sentence. 
My teacher says, “We must take care of our hygiene.”

Ans
1. My teacher says that we must take care of our hygiene.
2. My teacher said they took care of their hygiene.
3. My teacher said that we must be taking care of our hygiene.
4. My teacher says that we took care of our hygiene.
Q.94 Select the most appropriate one word substitution for the given words. 
Profane talk

Option:
1. Origami
2. Alchemy
3. Polygamy
4. Blasphemy
Q.95 Select the correct active form of the given sentence. 
A complaint has been made by him against the poor service of the hotel staff.

Option:
1. He has made a complaint against the poor service of the hotel staff.
2. He had made a complaint against the poor service of the hotel staff.
3. He will make a complaint against the poor service of the hotel staff.
4. He is making a complaint against the poor service of the hotel staff.
Q.96 Select the misspelt word.
Option:
1. Comparison
2. Frantick
3. Eminent
4. Estimate
Q.97 Select the most appropriate antonym of the given word. 
ABOMINABLE

Option:
1. Delightful
2. Hateful
3. Colourful
4. Distasteful
Q.98 Select the most appropriate meaning of the given idiom. 
Carry the day

Option:
1. Win a victory
2. Lift a heavy load
3. Bear the burden
4. Lead an army
Q.99 Select the most appropriate one word substitution for the given words. 
A fast moving stream of water

Option:
1. Torrent
2. Quake
3. Volcano
4. Fissure
Q.100 Select the correct indirect form of the given sentence. 
Rita said to her friend, “My sister is performing on stage today for the first time.”

Option:
1. Rita told to her friend that her sister is performing on stage that day for the first time. 
2. Rita told her friend that her sister was performing on stage that day for the first time. 
3. Rita said to her friend that my sister is performing on stage today for the first time. 
4. Rita told her friend that my sister was performing on stage today for the first time. 
Q.101 Select the most appropriate meaning of the given idiom. 
Eye-wash

Option:
1. An operation
2. A consideration
3. A deception
4. An inspiration
Q.102 Select the correct passive form of the given sentence. 
Are you blaming me for ruining your business?

Option:
1. Have I been blamed for ruining your business?
2. Am I being blamed for ruining your business?
3. Am I blaming you for ruining your business?
4. I am being blamed for ruining your business.
Q.103 Select the most appropriate option to fill in the blank. 
The hall was spacious ______ to accommodate all the guests.

Option:
1. also
2. enough
3. fairly
4. rather
Q.104 Identify the segment in the sentence which contains a grammatical error. 
This is only the decent dress that I have.

Option:
1. that I have
2. This is
3. only the
4. decent dress
Q.105 Given below are four sentences in jumbled order. Pick the option that gives their
correct order. 

A. One winter evening, the tiger was very hungry as he could find nothing to hunt.
B. On the mountain lived a ferocious tiger whose roar would make every villager tremble.
C. So, he decided to creep down into the village to get something to eat.
D. There was a small, quiet village at the base of a mountain.

Option:
1. DACB
2. BCDA
3. ACBD
4. DBAC
Q.106 Select the most appropriate option to improve the underlined segment in the given
sentence. If there is no need to improve it, select ‘No improvement’. 
Although they are twins, they are completely different than each other.

Option:
1. No improvement
2. different from
3. differ than
4. difference from
Q.107 Select the most appropriate option to improve the underlined segment in the given
sentence. If there is no need to improve it, select ‘No improvement’. 
Can you advice to me on this matter?

Option:
1. advise me
2. No improvement
3. advise to me
4. advising me
Q.108 Select the most appropriate option to improve the underlined segment in the given
sentence. If there is no need to improve it, select ‘No improvement’. 
I think she would be much more happier in her hometown.

Option:
1. No improvement
2. much happier
3. most happiest
4. more happier
Q.109 Given below are four sentences in jumbled order. Pick the option that gives their
correct order.

A. For this, he had set up an alarm to ring at intervals until morning.
B. So, he made sure he was awakened every hour during the night.
C. He strangely believed that he was likely to cease breathing when asleep.
D. A nervous cousin of mine was staying with us.

Option:
1. DBCA
2. DBAC
3. DACB
4. DCBA
Q.110 Select the most appropriate synonym of the given word. 
ASTONISHMENT

Option:
1. Wonder
2. Composure
3. Fright
4. Expectation
Q.111 Select the most appropriate one word substitution for the given words. 
A group of cattle

Option:
1. Herd
2. Flock
3. Litter
4. Pride
Q.112 Identify the segment in the sentence which contains a grammatical error. 
Did you told him about the new plot that you have bought?

Option:
1. have bought
2. Did you told him
3. about the new plot
4. that you
Q.113 Select the correct active form of the given sentence. 
His services were recognised by his community.

Option:
1. His community recognised his services.
2. His community is recognising his services.
3. His community recognises his services.
4. His community has recognised his services.
Q.114 Given below are four sentences in jumbled order. Pick the option that gives their
correct order.
 
A. I pointed them out to my companion.
B. The woman’s face was familiar but I could not recall who she was.
C. At the very next table to ours, sat Lady Edgware and Brian Martin.
D. As I was doing so, another couple came and joined them.

Option:
1. CADB
2. BCAD
3. ABCD
4. CDBA
Q.115 Select the most appropriate option to improve the underlined segment in the given
sentence. If there is no need to improve it, select ‘No improvement’. 
You will be in trouble if you don’t obey to my orders.

Option:
1. obey with my
2. No improvement
3. obeying my
4. obey my
Q.116 Identify the segment in the sentence which contains a grammatical error. 
Let us think how can we solve the problem amiably.

Option:
1. solve the problem
2. Let us think
3. amiably
4. how can we
Q.117 Select the most appropriate option to improve the underlined segment in the given
sentence. If there is no need to improve it, select ‘No improvement’. 
She was so tall to  reach the top shelf.

Option:
1. too tall for
2. No improvement
3. so tall that
4. tall enough to
Q.118 Select the correct direct form of the given sentence. 
Sanjeev said that he would surely succeed.

Option:
1. Sanjeev says, “I surely will succeed.”
2. Sanjeev said, “I will surely succeed.”
3. Sanjeev said, “I am going to succeed surely.”
4. Sanjeev says, “I have succeeded surely.”
Q.119 Select the correct passive form of the given sentence. 
Option:
1. Special attention is being paid to the weak students.
2. Special attention has been paid to the weak students.
3. Special attention is paid to the weak students.
4. Special attention are paid to the weak students.
Q.120 Given below are four sentences in jumbled order. Pick the option that gives their
correct order. 

A. “How refreshing the breeze that blows through them!”
B. Every morning, Chandni watched the hill tops bathed in sunlight.
C. She wanted to run to the hills but was stopped by the rope round her neck.
D. “How beautiful those hills are!” she thought.

Option:
1. ACDB
2. BDAC
3. DCBA
4. BCAD
Q.121 Given below are four sentences in jumbled order. Pick the option that gives their
correct order. 
A. He pulled out the letter that he had received from his brother.
B. Doctor Das looked a little upset.
C. He went to his desk and unlocked the drawer.
D. Then he laid it on the desk and pored over it.

Option:
1. BCAD
2. DACB
3. ADBC
4. CBDA
Q.122 Select the most appropriate option to improve the underlined segment in the given
sentence. If there is no need to improve it, select ‘No improvement’. 
You will have to pay heavy for your crimes.

Option:
1. to be paying heavily
2. to pay heavily
3. to paid heavily
4. No improvement
Q.123 Select the correct indirect form of the given sentence. 
I said to the office boy, “Take these papers to the manager immediately.”

Option:
1. I requested the office boy to take these papers to the manager immediately. 
2. I said to the office boy to take these papers to the manager immediately. 
3. I told the office boy take those papers to the manager immediately. 
4. I ordered the office boy to take those papers to the manager immediately. 
Q.124 Select the most appropriate one word substitution for the given words. 
A statement which cannot be contradicted

Option:
1. Irresistible
2. Irrefutable
3. Irrational
4. Irreparable
Q.125 Select the most appropriate meaning of the given idiom. 
Cry over spilt milk

Option:
1. To find a solution
2. To shout slogans
3. To blame others
4. To regret uselessly 
Q.126 Select the most appropriate one-word substitution for the given words. 
A detailed list of things in a place

Option:
1. Inventory
2. Glossary
3. Itinerary
4. Directory
Q.127 Select the most appropriate option to improve the underlined segment in the given
sentence. If there is no need to improve it, select ‘No improvement’. 
She ran out of her house from frightening
 .
Option:
1. No improvement
2. by frightening
3. in fright
4. from fright
Q.128 Given below are four sentences in jumbled order. Pick the option that gives their
correct order. 

A. Very soon, he bought a young goat.
B. When all his goats left him, Abdul was very lonely.
C. He simply couldn’t do without his pets.
D. He thought, “A young goat will stay with me for long.”

Option:
1. CADB
2. CDBA
3. BCAD
4. BDAC
Q.129 Select the most appropriate meaning of the given idiom. 
First and foremost

Option:
1. Most important aspect
2. Most difficult task
3. After everything else
4. Far from the truth
Q.130 Select the most appropriate option to fill in the blank. 
Everything happened so quickly ______ she felt dazed.

Option:
1. since
2. that
3. than
4. then
Q.131 Select the most appropriate meaning of the given idiom. 
Apple of one’s eye

Option:
1. Very clean
2. Very easy
3. Very rosy
4. Very dear
Q.132 Identify the segment in the sentence which contains a grammatical error. 
He has shattered his neighbour’s window by purpose.

Option:
1. neighbour’s window
2. He has
3. shattered his
4. by purpose
Q.133 Select the most appropriate option to improve the underlined segment in the given
sentence. If there is no need to improve it, select ‘No improvement’. 
I cannot recollect where did I leave my umbrella.

Option:
1. I did leave
2. I left
3. No improvement
4. I have leave
Q.134 Identify the segment in the sentence which contains a grammatical error. 
Three hours will have passed when the bell will ring.

Option:
1. will ring
2. will have passed
3. Three hours
4. when the bell
Q.135 Select the correct indirect form of the given sentence. 
Suman said to Meeta, “I have been invited to the show but I will not be able to go.”

Option:
1. Suman told Meeta that she has been invited to the show but I will not be able to go.
2. Suman told Meeta that she had invited to the show but she will not be able to go.
3. Suman told to Meeta that I was being invited to the show but I would not be able to go.
4. Suman told Meeta that she had been invited to the show but she would not be able to go.
Q.136 Select the correct direct form of the given sentence. 
The shopkeeper apologised for the mistake he had made in his calculations.

Option:
1. The shopkeeper said, “I apologised for the mistake that I make in my calculations.” 
2. The shopkeeper said, “I am sorry for the mistake that he makes in my calculations.” 
3. The shopkeeper said, “I am sorry. I made a mistake in my calculations.” 
4. The shopkeeper said, “I apologise. I made a mistake in his calculations.” 
Q.137 Identify the segment in the sentence which contains a grammatical error. 
They will be ready leaving for the airport in an hour.

Option:
1. ready leaving
2. for the airport
3. They will be
4. in an hour
Q.138 Select the most appropriate one word substitution for the given words. 
A group of people travelling together, especially in a desert

Option:
1. Caravan
2. Procession
3. Parade
4. Pilgrimage
Q.139 Given below are four sentences in jumbled order. Pick the option that gives their
correct order. 

A. She declared that nothing would make her go to the party.
B. She left within half an hour dressed in an elegant black gown.
C. Yet, ten minutes later she seemed to change her mind.
D. At six o’clock Camilla was throwing her weight about. 

Option:

1. ABCD
2. CBAD
3. BCDA
4. DACB
Q.140 Select the correct active form of the given sentence. 
The theft was reported to the police by the curator.

Option:
1. The curator has reported the theft to the police.
2. The curator had reported the theft to the police.
3. The curator is reporting the theft to the police.
4. The curator reported the theft to the police.
Q.141 Select the correct passive form of the given sentence. 
We will consider your application favourably for the vacancy.

Option:
1. Your application will be considered favourably for the vacancy.
2. Your application has been considered favourably for the vacancy.
3. Your application is being considered favourably for the vacancy.
4. Your vacancy will be considered favourably for the application.
Q.142 Given below are four sentences in jumbled order. Pick the option that gives their
correct order. 
A. He heard some robbers planning to commit a robbery at the moneylender ’s house.
B. A man was roaming in the village at night.
C. However, the robbers outnumbered him and overpowered him easily.
D. He followed them and confronted them boldly.

Option:
1. DBCA
2. BCAD
3. CDAB
4. BADC 
Q.143 Select the correct direct form of the given sentence. 
She suggested that we should distribute food among the needy.

Option:
1. She ordered, “Distribute food among the needy.”
2. She said, “Let them distribute food among the needy.”
3. She said, “Let us distribute food among the needy.”
4. She said, “We could distribute food among the needy.”
Q.144 Select the most appropriate synonym of the given word. 
CONDESCENDING

Option:
1. Accusing
2. Patronising
3. Creating
4. Stimulating
Q.145 Select the correct active form of the given sentence. 
Dinner will have been cooked by me tonight.
Option:
1. I would have cooked dinner tonight.
2. I have been cooking dinner tonight.
3. I will have cooked dinner tonight.
4. I will be cooking dinner tonight.
Q.146 Select the correct active form of the given sentence. 
Were you summoned for interrogation by the police
?
Option:
1. Were the police summoning you for interrogation?
2. Did the police summoned you for interrogation?
3. Did the police summon you for interrogation?
4. Has the police summoned you for interrogation?
Q.147 Select the most appropriate option to improve the underlined segment in the given
sentence. If there is no need to improve it, select ‘No improvement’. 
You will participate in the marathon,won’t you ?

Option:
1. didn’t you
2. isn’t it
3. will you
4. No improvement
Q.148 Select the most appropriate option to improve the underlined segment in the given
sentence. If there is no need to improve it, select ‘No improvement’. 
His conduct does not accord for his noble profession.

Option:
1. accorded from
2. No improvement 
3. according to
4. accord with
Q.149 Given below are four sentences in jumbled order. Pick the option that gives their
correct order. 

A. Also, her face looked extraordinarily haggard.
B. Her large eyes seemed larger and darker than ever.
C. I greeted her and set a chair for her to sit on.
D. There were dark circles around them as though she hadn’t slept.

Option:
1. BACD 
2. CADB 
3. BCAD
4. CBDA
Q.150 Select the correct indirect form of the given sentence. 
She said, “However hard it rains, I have to go to work.”

Option:
1. She said that however hard it may rained, she have to go to work. 
2. She said that however hard it rained, she had to go to work. 
3. She said that even if it rains hard, she had to go to work. 
4. She said that however hard it might rain, she has to go to work. 
Q.151 Select the correct indirect form of the given sentence. 
I said to him angrily, “Get out and don’t dare to come here again.”

Option:
1. I ordered him that get out and not dare to come here again.
2. I ordered him to get out and don’t dare to come here again.
3. I ordered him to get out and not dare to come there again.
4. I ordered him get out and don’t dare to come there again.
Q.152 Identify the segment in the sentence which contains a grammatical error. 
As such you need any money, just write to me.

Option:
1. need any money
2. to me
3.  just write
4. As such you
Q.153 Given below are four sentences in jumbled order. Pick the option that gives their
correct order.

A. It involves making sound and sometimes difficult decisions.
B. Having the quality of courage means that one is willing to take risks for the achievement of goals.
C. Leadership is the ability of an individual to influence and guide followers.
D. One of the most important qualities of a good leader is courage.

Option:
1. ABCD
2. DCBA
3. BDAC
4. CADB
Q.154 Select the most appropriate meaning of the given idiom. 
Behind one’s back

Option:
1. In one’s absence 
2. In everyone’s knowledge
3. Confronting somebody
4. Openly supporting someone
Q.155 Select the most appropriate option to improve the underlined segment in the given
sentence. If there is no need to improve it, select ‘No improvement’. 
I wish I know  how to play the guitar.

Option:
1. No improvement
2. I knew
3. I have known
4. I am knowing
Q.156 Identify the segment in the sentence which contains a grammatical error. 
She is not as smart as I think at first.

Option:
1. I think
2. She is not
3. as smart as
4. at first
Q.157 Select the correct active form of the given sentence. 
So much noise ought not to be made by you and your friends.

Option:
1. You and your friends ought not to have made so much noise.
2. You and your friends ought not to make so much noise.
3. You and your friends ought not to be making so much noise.
4. You and your friends ought to not make so much noise.
Q.158 Identify the segment in the sentence which contains a grammatical error.
She asked me where had I gone for dinner with my fiance.

Option:
1. gone for dinner
2. with my fiance
3. where had I
4. She asked me
Q.159 Select the correct direct form of the given sentence. 
She asked her mother why she was so upset that day.

Option:
1. She said to her mother, “Why you are so upset today?”
2. She said to her mother, “Why were you so upset that day?”
3. She said to her mother, “Why are you so upset today?”
4. She said to her mother, “Are you upset today?”
Q.160 Identify the segment in the sentence which contains a grammatical error. 
He thinks that he can get away among lying and cheating.

Option:
1. among lying
2. he can get away
3. He thinks that
4. and cheating
Q.161 Select the most appropriate one word substitution for the given words. 
Not supporting any side in an argument

Option:
1. Involved
2. Impartial
3. Biased
4. Natural
Q.162 Identify the segment in the sentence which contains a grammatical error. 
Whole country applauded the courage of our soldiers.

Option:
1. applauded the
2. our soldiers
3. Whole country
4. courage of
Q.163 Select the correct active form of the given sentence. 
Why are the people being allowed to gather on the streets?

Option:
1. Why are they allowing people to gather on the streets?
2. Why will they allow people to gather on the streets?
3. Why have they allowed people to gather on the streets?
4. Why had they allowed people to gather on the streets?
Q.164 Select the correct active form of the given sentence. 
Let the guests be served some soup.

Option:
1. Serve some soup to the guests.
2. Let some soup serve the guests.
3. Have you served some soup to the guests?
4. You should have served some soup to the guests.
Q.165 Select the correct direct form of the given sentence. 
She told me that she knew I wanted to help her but she could manage on her own.

Option:
1. She said to me, “I know I want to help you but you can manage on your own.”
2. She said to me, “I knew you want to help her but I could manage on my own.”
3. She said to me, “I know you want to help me but I can manage on my own.”
4. She said to me, “I know you wanted to help me but she can manage on her own.”
Q.166 Select the correct direct form of the given sentence. 
I asked him if it had never occurred to him that he was in the wrong profession.

Option:
1. I said to him, “Has it never occurred to you that he was the wrong profession?”
2. I said to him, “Does it never occur to you that you are in the wrong profession?”
3. I said to him, “Have it never occurred to you that he is in the wrong profession?”
4. I said to him, “Has it never occurred to you that you are in the wrong profession?”
Q.167 Identify the segment in the sentence which contains a grammatical error. 
Aren’t you such young to travel by yourself?

Option:
1. by yourself
2. Aren’t you
3. to travel
4. such young
Q.168 Given below are four sentences in jumbled order. Pick the option that gives their
correct order. 

A. Then I went up the steps to apartment number 17D.
B. I strode along the pavement hurriedly and crossed the road.
C. The hall was empty and there was no sign of anyone having entered before me.
D. I opened the door with my key and went in.

Option:
1. BADC 
2. BCDA 
3. CDAB
4. DBCA
Q.169 Select the correct passive form of the given sentence. 
How many glasses of water do you drink daily?

Option:
1. How many glasses of water is drank by you daily?
2. How many glasses of water are drank by you daily?
3. How many glasses of water are drunk by you daily?
4. How many glasses of water have been drunk by you daily?
Q.170 Select the correct indirect form of the given sentence. 
The old woman said to her neighbour, “Please buy some vegetables for me tomorrow.”

Option:
1. The old woman ordered her neighbour to buy some vegetables for me the next day.
2. The old woman requested her neighbour to buy some vegetables for her the next day.
3. The old woman requested to her neighbour to please buy some vegetables for her tomorrow.
4. The old woman told her neighbour that buy some vegetables for me tomorrow.
Q.171 Select the correct indirect form of the given sentence. 
The teacher said to the students, “Jupiter is the largest planet.”

Option:
1. The teacher says to the students that Jupiter was the largest planet.
2. The teacher told the students that Jupiter is the largest planet.
3. The teacher told to the students that Jupiter was the largest planet.
4. The teacher said students Jupiter is the largest planet.
Q.172 Select the most appropriate one word substitution for the given words. 
The science concerned with the properties of sound

Option:
1. Pedagogy
2. Acoustics
3. Geology
4. Acrobatics
Q.173 Select the most appropriate antonym of the given word. 
TEMPORARY

Option:
1. Transitory
2. Lasting
3. Interim
4. Momentary
Q.174 Given below are four sentences in jumbled order. Pick the option that gives their
correct order.
 
A. When it saw me, it moved quickly and hid itself in a coconut shell.
B. I quietly went near and closed the mouth of the coconut shell with a stone.
C. One day I saw a small snake in the compound.
D. It was crawling along slowly.

Option:
1. DBCA
2. BCAD
3. ABCD
4. CDAB
Q.175 Select the correct passive form of the given sentence. 
They called a plumber to replace the rusted pipes.

Option:
1. A plumber will be called to replace the rusted pipes.
2. A plumber was called to replace the rusted pipes.
3. A plumber is called to replace the rusted pipes.
4. A plumber has called to replace the rusted pipes.
Q.176 Select the correct indirect form of the given sentence. 
He said to me, “Where did you go to collect the flower samples?”

Option:
1. He asked me where did you go to collect the flower samples.
2. He asked me that where did I went to collect the flower samples.
3. He asked to me that where did I go to collect the flower samples.
4. He asked me where I had gone to collect the flower samples.
Q.177 Select the most appropriate option to improve the underlined segment in the given
sentence. If there is no need to improve it, select ‘No improvement’. 
She came home to meet I and mine family.

Option:
1. myself and mine
2. No improvement 
3. me and mine
4. me and my
Q.178 Select the correct direct form of the given sentence. 
Rahul said that he had slipped and fallen on the marshy land.

Option:
1. Rahul said, “I slipped and fallen on the marshy land.”
2. Rahul said, “He have slipped and fallen on the marshy land.”
3. Rahul said, “I slipped and fell on the marshy land.”
4. Rahul said, “He slips and falls on the marshy land.”
Q.179 Identify the segment in the sentence which contains a grammatical error. 
They are planning for settling in Mumbai with their son.

Option:
1. for settling
2. They are planning
3. with their son
4. in Mumbai
Q.180 Given below are four sentences in jumbled order. Pick the option that gives their
correct order.
 
A. He ran across the garden and through the paddy fields.
B. He ran and ran and did not stop until he reached a small house at the end of the village.
C. Grandfather took me in his arms and started running.
D. Then he shouted for the man who lived there to come out.

Option:
1. DBCA
2. CABD
3. BCAD
4. ADBC 
Q.181 Select the most appropriate option to fill in the blank. 
Everyone in the family ______ been questioned about the theft.

Option:
1. is
2. are
3. has
4. have
Q.182 Select the most appropriate one word substitution for the given words. 
An extreme fear of darkness

Option:
1. Hydrophobia
2. Acrophobia 
3. Nyctophobia 
4. Hemophobia 
Q.183 Select the most appropriate option to improve the underlined segment in the given
sentence. If there is no need to improve it, select ‘No improvement’. 
Try to avail of every opportunity that comes your way.

Option:
1. avail to
2. avail yourself of
3. No improvement
4. availing of
Q.184 Identify the segment in the sentence which contains a grammatical error. 
The seat which you are sitting on is my.

Option:
1. which you
2. is my
3. The seat
4. are sitting on
Q.185 Select the correct indirect form of the given sentence. 
The doctor said to Anita, “Are you feeling better now?”

Option:
1. The doctor asked Anita was she was feeling better then.
2. The doctor asked Anita that if she were feeling better now.
3. The doctor asked Anita if she was feeling better then.
4. The doctor asked to Anita if she was feeling better now.
Q.186 Identify the segment in the sentence which contains a grammatical error. 
I can explain you the reason for the delay in executing your order.

Option:
1. the reason for
2. your order
3. the delay in executing
4. I can explain you
Q.187 Identify the segment in the sentence which contains a grammatical error. 
An eight years old girl has made this beautiful painting.

Option:
1. girl has
2. made this
3. An eight years old
4. beautiful painting
Q.188 Given below are four sentences in jumbled order. Pick the option that gives their
correct order. 

A. I had heard a great deal about Miss Beam’s school.
B. Her eyes were covered with a bandage and she was being led carefully by an older boy.
C. When I arrived, there was no one in sight but a girl of about twelve.
D. But not till last week did the chance come to visit it.

Option:
1. DCAB
2. ADCB
3. CBDA
4. BDAC
Q.189 Given below are four sentences in jumbled order. Pick the option that gives their
correct order. 

A. This liquid shines in the sunlight and attracts insects.
B. As soon as an insect touches the hair, it gets stuck fast to the leaf.
C. Each hair has a drop of sticky liquid at its end.
D. The sundew plant has leaves covered with little hair
.

Option:
1. BADC
2. ACBD
3. CBAD
4. DCAB
Q.190 Identify the segment in the sentence which contains a grammatical error. 
The concert has started when he reached the venue.

Option:
1.  reached the venue
2.  has started
3. The concert
4.  when he
Q.191 Given below are four sentences in jumbled order. Pick the option that gives their
correct order. 

A. He took great care of his subjects and made sure they lived in happiness.
B. Sometimes he himself went amongst the people in disguise to see and learn about
their actual state.
C. He sent spies into the kingdom to report to him about the condition of his people.
D. A just and loving king once ruled over a large kingdom.

Option:
1. CABD
2. DBCA
3. DACB
4. BDAC
Q.192 Select the most appropriate antonym of the given word. 
BLOATED

Option:
1. Swollen
2. Deflated
3. Turgid
4. Arrogant
Q.193 Select the most appropriate option to improve the underlined segment in the given
sentence. If there is no need to improve it, select ‘No improvement’. 
He has hardly some near friends.

Option:
1. few close
2. many near
3. No improvement
4. any close
Q.194 Given below are four sentences in jumbled order. Pick the option that gives their
correct order. 

A. She is the athlete who ran as fast as a bullet in the 400 m race at the World Under-20
Championship in 2018.
B. Kandhulimari village in Dhing has suddenly come into the spotlight of fame.
C. She won a gold medal for the country and the hearts of all Indians.
D. This is the home of Hima Das, nicknamed ‘the Dhing Express’.

Option:
1. DBCA
2. BDAC
3. DABC
4. BCAD
Q.195 Select the most appropriate one word substitution for the given words. 
Act of giving up the throne

Option:
1. Abdication
2. Adulation
3. Admiration
4. Addiction
Q.196 Identify the segment in the sentence which contains a grammatical error. 
The captain scored a century in a second innings.

Option:
1. second innings
2. The captain
3. scored a century
4. in a
Q.197 Select the correct passive form of the given sentence. 
The fierce storm wrecked the ship.

Option:
1. The storm is wrecked by the fierce ship.
2. The ship was being wrecked by the fierce storm.
3. The ship was wrecked by the fierce storm.
4. The ship has been wrecked by the fierce storm.
Q.198 Select the correct passive form of the given sentence. 
How much do you pay as insurance premium?

Option:
1. How much is been paid by you as insurance premium?
2. How much has been paid by you as insurance premium?
3. How much is being paid by you as insurance premium?
4. How much is paid by you as insurance premium?
Q.199 Select the correct indirect form of the given sentence. 
He said to me, “How delighted I am to see your work!”

Option:
1. He exclaimed that he was very delighted to see my work.
2. He said that how very delighted he was to see my work.
3. He exclaimed that he is very delighted to see your work.
4. He told me that how he was delighted to see my work.
Q.200 Select the correct active form of the given sentence.
It is believed by the doctors that she will soon recover.

Option:
1. The doctors have believed that she is soon recovering.
2. The doctors are believing that she will soon recover.
3. The doctors believe that she would soon recover.
4. The doctors believe that she will soon recover.

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