SSC CGL (Tier - 2) Online Exam Paper - 2019 "held on 15 November 2020" Evening Shift (English Language and Comprehension)



SSC CGL (Tier - 2) Online Exam Paper - 2019 "held on 15 November 2020"

Evening Shift (English Language and Comprehension)



  • Exam Name: SSC CGL (Tier - 2)
  • Year: 2019
  • EXAM DATE : 15 November 20120
  • EXAM START TIME : 03.00
  • Total Marks: 200 

Comprehension:
In the following passage some words have been deleted. Fill in the blanks with the help of the
alternatives given. Select the most appropriate option for each number. 
Temptations of one kind or another lure everyone. The important thing is (1)______ them from
gaining a foothold in our (2)______. As soon as we detect the first (3)______ of temptation,
we should become watchful and (4)______ our attention to good or noble thoughts.
(5)______ we wait till the temptation becomes too (6)______, we are likely to fall. Playing with
the temptation (7)______ to welcoming it. In fact, the safest (8)______ is to avoid situations in
which we may be tempted. If, (9)______ all our care, a temptation becomes severe, we
(10)______ not get upset or disappointed, but turn to a good friend for advice and help.
SubQuestion No : 1
Q.1 Select the most appropriate option to fill in the blank No. 1.

Option:
1. to preventing
2. prevented
3. to prevent
4. prevent

Comprehension:
In the following passage some words have been deleted. Fill in the blanks with the help of the
alternatives given. Select the most appropriate option for each number. 
Temptations of one kind or another lure everyone. The important thing is (1)______ them from
gaining a foothold in our (2)______. As soon as we detect the first (3)______ of temptation,
we should become watchful and (4)______ our attention to good or noble thoughts.
(5)______ we wait till the temptation becomes too (6)______, we are likely to fall. Playing with
the temptation (7)______ to welcoming it. In fact, the safest (8)______ is to avoid situations in
which we may be tempted. If, (9)______ all our care, a temptation becomes severe, we
(10)______ not get upset or disappointed, but turn to a good friend for advice and help.
SubQuestion No : 2
Q.2 Select the most appropriate option to fill in the blank No. 2.

Option:
1. minds
2. bodies
3. eyes
4. souls
Comprehension:
In the following passage some words have been deleted. Fill in the blanks with the help of the
alternatives given. Select the most appropriate option for each number. 
Temptations of one kind or another lure everyone. The important thing is (1)______ them from
gaining a foothold in our (2)______. As soon as we detect the first (3)______ of temptation,
we should become watchful and (4)______ our attention to good or noble thoughts.
(5)______ we wait till the temptation becomes too (6)______, we are likely to fall. Playing with
the temptation (7)______ to welcoming it. In fact, the safest (8)______ is to avoid situations in
which we may be tempted. If, (9)______ all our care, a temptation becomes severe, we
(10)______ not get upset or disappointed, but turn to a good friend for advice and help.
SubQuestion No : 3
Q.3 Select the most appropriate option to fill in the blank No. 3.

Option:
1. messages
2. signs
3. codes
4. symbols

Comprehension:
In the following passage some words have been deleted. Fill in the blanks with the help of the
alternatives given. Select the most appropriate option for each number. 
Temptations of one kind or another lure everyone. The important thing is (1)______ them from
gaining a foothold in our (2)______. As soon as we detect the first (3)______ of temptation,
we should become watchful and (4)______ our attention to good or noble thoughts.
(5)______ we wait till the temptation becomes too (6)______, we are likely to fall. Playing with
the temptation (7)______ to welcoming it. In fact, the safest (8)______ is to avoid situations in
which we may be tempted. If, (9)______ all our care, a temptation becomes severe, we
(10)______ not get upset or disappointed, but turn to a good friend for advice and help.
SubQuestion No : 4
Q.4 Select the most appropriate option to fill in the blank No. 4.

Option:
1. turn
2. revolve
3. change
4. twist
Comprehension:
In the following passage some words have been deleted. Fill in the blanks with the help of the
alternatives given. Select the most appropriate option for each number. 
Temptations of one kind or another lure everyone. The important thing is (1)______ them from
gaining a foothold in our (2)______. As soon as we detect the first (3)______ of temptation,
we should become watchful and (4)______ our attention to good or noble thoughts.
(5)______ we wait till the temptation becomes too (6)______, we are likely to fall. Playing with
the temptation (7)______ to welcoming it. In fact, the safest (8)______ is to avoid situations in
which we may be tempted. If, (9)______ all our care, a temptation becomes severe, we
(10)______ not get upset or disappointed, but turn to a good friend for advice and help.
SubQuestion No : 5
Q.5 Select the most appropriate option to fill in the blank No. 5.

Option:
1. Unless
2. If
3. Whether
4. Until
Comprehension:
In the following passage some words have been deleted. Fill in the blanks with the help of the
alternatives given. Select the most appropriate option for each number. 
Temptations of one kind or another lure everyone. The important thing is (1)______ them from
gaining a foothold in our (2)______. As soon as we detect the first (3)______ of temptation,
we should become watchful and (4)______ our attention to good or noble thoughts.
(5)______ we wait till the temptation becomes too (6)______, we are likely to fall. Playing with
the temptation (7)______ to welcoming it. In fact, the safest (8)______ is to avoid situations in
which we may be tempted. If, (9)______ all our care, a temptation becomes severe, we
(10)______ not get upset or disappointed, but turn to a good friend for advice and help.
SubQuestion No : 6
Q.6 Select the most appropriate option to fill in the blank No. 6.

Option:
1. strong
2. burly
3. feeble
4. weak
Comprehension:
In the following passage some words have been deleted. Fill in the blanks with the help of the
alternatives given. Select the most appropriate option for each number. 
Temptations of one kind or another lure everyone. The important thing is (1)______ them from
gaining a foothold in our (2)______. As soon as we detect the first (3)______ of temptation,
we should become watchful and (4)______ our attention to good or noble thoughts.
(5)______ we wait till the temptation becomes too (6)______, we are likely to fall. Playing with
the temptation (7)______ to welcoming it. In fact, the safest (8)______ is to avoid situations in
which we may be tempted. If, (9)______ all our care, a temptation becomes severe, we
(10)______ not get upset or disappointed, but turn to a good friend for advice and help.
SubQuestion No : 7
Q.7 Select the most appropriate option to fill in the blank No. 7

Option:
1. amounts
2. amount
3. amounted
4. amounting
Comprehension:
In the following passage some words have been deleted. Fill in the blanks with the help of the
alternatives given. Select the most appropriate option for each number. 
Temptations of one kind or another lure everyone. The important thing is (1)______ them from
gaining a foothold in our (2)______. As soon as we detect the first (3)______ of temptation,
we should become watchful and (4)______ our attention to good or noble thoughts.
(5)______ we wait till the temptation becomes too (6)______, we are likely to fall. Playing with
the temptation (7)______ to welcoming it. In fact, the safest (8)______ is to avoid situations in
which we may be tempted. If, (9)______ all our care, a temptation becomes severe, we
(10)______ not get upset or disappointed, but turn to a good friend for advice and help.
SubQuestion No : 8
Q.8 Select the most appropriate option to fill in the blank No. 8.

Option:
1. item
2. track
3. object
4. thing
Comprehension:
In the following passage some words have been deleted. Fill in the blanks with the help of the
alternatives given. Select the most appropriate option for each number. 
Temptations of one kind or another lure everyone. The important thing is (1)______ them from
gaining a foothold in our (2)______. As soon as we detect the first (3)______ of temptation,
we should become watchful and (4)______ our attention to good or noble thoughts.
(5)______ we wait till the temptation becomes too (6)______, we are likely to fall. Playing with
the temptation (7)______ to welcoming it. In fact, the safest (8)______ is to avoid situations in
which we may be tempted. If, (9)______ all our care, a temptation becomes severe, we
(10)______ not get upset or disappointed, but turn to a good friend for advice and help.
SubQuestion No : 9
Q.9 Select the most appropriate option to fill in the blank No. 9.

Ans
1. because of
2. despite
3. instead of
4. in case of
Comprehension:
In the following passage some words have been deleted. Fill in the blanks with the help of the
alternatives given. Select the most appropriate option for each number. 
Temptations of one kind or another lure everyone. The important thing is (1)______ them from
gaining a foothold in our (2)______. As soon as we detect the first (3)______ of temptation,
we should become watchful and (4)______ our attention to good or noble thoughts.
(5)______ we wait till the temptation becomes too (6)______, we are likely to fall. Playing with
the temptation (7)______ to welcoming it. In fact, the safest (8)______ is to avoid situations in
which we may be tempted. If, (9)______ all our care, a temptation becomes severe, we
(10)______ not get upset or disappointed, but turn to a good friend for advice and help.
SubQuestion No : 10
Q.10 Select the most appropriate option to fill in the blank No. 10.

Option:
1. should
2. could
3. would
4. might

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Comprehension:
In the following passage some words have been deleted. Fill in the blanks with the help of the
alternatives given. Select the most appropriate option for each number.
Antarctica is perhaps the one place on Earth no one would have expected (1)______
canyons. And yet, scientists were surprised to (2)______ deep crevices that run for hundreds
of kilometres. (3)______ they are not visible at the snowy surface, (4)______ trenches cut
deep into Antarctica. The biggest (5)______ canyon is over 350 km long. It’s called
‘Foundation Trough’. (6)______ canyons are not as long, but they are (7)______ too. These
canyons were found with the help of radars (8)______ scanning the wide expanse of the
frozen continent. (9)______ are incredibly important because they help control (10)______
flow of the ice.
SubQuestion No : 11
Q.11 Select the most appropriate option to fill in the blank No. 1.

Option:
1. finding
2. found
3. to find
4. find
Comprehension:
In the following passage some words have been deleted. Fill in the blanks with the help of the
alternatives given. Select the most appropriate option for each number.
Antarctica is perhaps the one place on Earth no one would have expected (1)______
canyons. And yet, scientists were surprised to (2)______ deep crevices that run for hundreds
of kilometres. (3)______ they are not visible at the snowy surface, (4)______ trenches cut
deep into Antarctica. The biggest (5)______ canyon is over 350 km long. It’s called
‘Foundation Trough’. (6)______ canyons are not as long, but they are (7)______ too. These
canyons were found with the help of radars (8)______ scanning the wide expanse of the
frozen continent. (9)______ are incredibly important because they help control (10)______
flow of the ice.
SubQuestion No : 12
Q.12 Select the most appropriate option to fill in the blank No. 2.

Option:
1. discover
2. invent
3. explore
4. search
Comprehension:
In the following passage some words have been deleted. Fill in the blanks with the help of the
alternatives given. Select the most appropriate option for each number.
Antarctica is perhaps the one place on Earth no one would have expected (1)______
canyons. And yet, scientists were surprised to (2)______ deep crevices that run for hundreds
of kilometres. (3)______ they are not visible at the snowy surface, (4)______ trenches cut
deep into Antarctica. The biggest (5)______ canyon is over 350 km long. It’s called
‘Foundation Trough’. (6)______ canyons are not as long, but they are (7)______ too. These
canyons were found with the help of radars (8)______ scanning the wide expanse of the
frozen continent. (9)______ are incredibly important because they help control (10)______
flow of the ice.
SubQuestion No : 13
Q.13 Select the most appropriate option to fill in the blank No. 3.

Option:
1. In case
2. Although
3. Since
4. Because
Comprehension:
In the following passage some words have been deleted. Fill in the blanks with the help of the
alternatives given. Select the most appropriate option for each number.
Antarctica is perhaps the one place on Earth no one would have expected (1)______
canyons. And yet, scientists were surprised to (2)______ deep crevices that run for hundreds
of kilometres. (3)______ they are not visible at the snowy surface, (4)______ trenches cut
deep into Antarctica. The biggest (5)______ canyon is over 350 km long. It’s called
‘Foundation Trough’. (6)______ canyons are not as long, but they are (7)______ too. These
canyons were found with the help of radars (8)______ scanning the wide expanse of the
frozen continent. (9)______ are incredibly important because they help control (10)______
flow of the ice.
SubQuestion No : 14
Q.14 Select the most appropriate option to fill in the blank No. 4.

Option:
1. them
2. this
3. these
4. those
Comprehension:
In the following passage some words have been deleted. Fill in the blanks with the help of the
alternatives given. Select the most appropriate option for each number.
Antarctica is perhaps the one place on Earth no one would have expected (1)______
canyons. And yet, scientists were surprised to (2)______ deep crevices that run for hundreds
of kilometres. (3)______ they are not visible at the snowy surface, (4)______ trenches cut
deep into Antarctica. The biggest (5)______ canyon is over 350 km long. It’s called
‘Foundation Trough’. (6)______ canyons are not as long, but they are (7)______ too. These
canyons were found with the help of radars (8)______ scanning the wide expanse of the
frozen continent. (9)______ are incredibly important because they help control (10)______
flow of the ice.
SubQuestion No : 15
Q.15 Select the most appropriate option to fill in the blank No. 5.

Option:
1. one
2. like
3. so
4. such
Comprehension:
In the following passage some words have been deleted. Fill in the blanks with the help of the
alternatives given. Select the most appropriate option for each number.
Antarctica is perhaps the one place on Earth no one would have expected (1)______
canyons. And yet, scientists were surprised to (2)______ deep crevices that run for hundreds
of kilometres. (3)______ they are not visible at the snowy surface, (4)______ trenches cut
deep into Antarctica. The biggest (5)______ canyon is over 350 km long. It’s called
‘Foundation Trough’. (6)______ canyons are not as long, but they are (7)______ too. These
canyons were found with the help of radars (8)______ scanning the wide expanse of the
frozen continent. (9)______ are incredibly important because they help control (10)______
flow of the ice.
SubQuestion No : 16
Q.16 Select the most appropriate option to fill in the blank No. 6.

Option:
1. Previous
2. Another
3. Present
4. Other
Comprehension:
In the following passage some words have been deleted. Fill in the blanks with the help of the
alternatives given. Select the most appropriate option for each number.
Antarctica is perhaps the one place on Earth no one would have expected (1)______
canyons. And yet, scientists were surprised to (2)______ deep crevices that run for hundreds
of kilometres. (3)______ they are not visible at the snowy surface, (4)______ trenches cut
deep into Antarctica. The biggest (5)______ canyon is over 350 km long. It’s called
‘Foundation Trough’. (6)______ canyons are not as long, but they are (7)______ too. These
canyons were found with the help of radars (8)______ scanning the wide expanse of the
frozen continent. (9)______ are incredibly important because they help control (10)______
flow of the ice.
SubQuestion No : 17
Q.17 Select the most appropriate option to fill in the blank No. 7

Option:
1. exciting
2. impressive
3. intense
4. inspiring
Comprehension:
In the following passage some words have been deleted. Fill in the blanks with the help of the
alternatives given. Select the most appropriate option for each number.
Antarctica is perhaps the one place on Earth no one would have expected (1)______
canyons. And yet, scientists were surprised to (2)______ deep crevices that run for hundreds
of kilometres. (3)______ they are not visible at the snowy surface, (4)______ trenches cut
deep into Antarctica. The biggest (5)______ canyon is over 350 km long. It’s called
‘Foundation Trough’. (6)______ canyons are not as long, but they are (7)______ too. These
canyons were found with the help of radars (8)______ scanning the wide expanse of the
frozen continent. (9)______ are incredibly important because they help control (10)______
flow of the ice.
SubQuestion No : 18
Q.18 Select the most appropriate option to fill in the blank No. 8.

Option:
1. until
2. when
3. after
4. before
Comprehension:
In the following passage some words have been deleted. Fill in the blanks with the help of the
alternatives given. Select the most appropriate option for each number.
Antarctica is perhaps the one place on Earth no one would have expected (1)______
canyons. And yet, scientists were surprised to (2)______ deep crevices that run for hundreds
of kilometres. (3)______ they are not visible at the snowy surface, (4)______ trenches cut
deep into Antarctica. The biggest (5)______ canyon is over 350 km long. It’s called
‘Foundation Trough’. (6)______ canyons are not as long, but they are (7)______ too. These
canyons were found with the help of radars (8)______ scanning the wide expanse of the
frozen continent. (9)______ are incredibly important because they help control (10)______
flow of the ice.
SubQuestion No : 19
Q.19 Select the most appropriate option to fill in the blank No. 9.

Option:
1. This
2. That
3. They
4. Them
Comprehension:
In the following passage some words have been deleted. Fill in the blanks with the help of the
alternatives given. Select the most appropriate option for each number.
Antarctica is perhaps the one place on Earth no one would have expected (1)______
canyons. And yet, scientists were surprised to (2)______ deep crevices that run for hundreds
of kilometres. (3)______ they are not visible at the snowy surface, (4)______ trenches cut
deep into Antarctica. The biggest (5)______ canyon is over 350 km long. It’s called
‘Foundation Trough’. (6)______ canyons are not as long, but they are (7)______ too. These
canyons were found with the help of radars (8)______ scanning the wide expanse of the
frozen continent. (9)______ are incredibly important because they help control (10)______
flow of the ice.
SubQuestion No : 20
Q.20 Select the most appropriate option to fill in the blank No. 10.

Option:
1. such
2. one
3. the
4. a
Comprehension:
In the following passage some words have been deleted. Fill in the blanks with the help of the
alternatives given. Select the most appropriate option for each number.
The endurance of the crowds lining the Coronation route was most commendable. Soaked,
chilled and sleepless, (1)______ remained wonderfully good-tempered and when the
procession finally (2)______ they cheered whole-heartedly. The great merit of a (3)______
crowd is that its members remain individuals. It is (4)______ characteristic of the British
culture that British people can collect in crowds (5)______ do not turn into mobs.
SubQuestion No : 21
Q.21 Select the most appropriate option to fill in the blank No. 1.

Option:
1. we
2. they
3. he
4. it
Comprehension:
In the following passage some words have been deleted. Fill in the blanks with the help of the
alternatives given. Select the most appropriate option for each number.
The endurance of the crowds lining the Coronation route was most commendable. Soaked,
chilled and sleepless, (1)______ remained wonderfully good-tempered and when the
procession finally (2)______ they cheered whole-heartedly. The great merit of a (3)______
crowd is that its members remain individuals. It is (4)______ characteristic of the British
culture that British people can collect in crowds (5)______ do not turn into mobs.
SubQuestion No : 22
Q.22 Select the most appropriate option to fill in the blank No. 2.

Option:
1. appeared
2. entered
3. joined
4. finished
Comprehension:
In the following passage some words have been deleted. Fill in the blanks with the help of the
alternatives given. Select the most appropriate option for each number.
The endurance of the crowds lining the Coronation route was most commendable. Soaked,
chilled and sleepless, (1)______ remained wonderfully good-tempered and when the
procession finally (2)______ they cheered whole-heartedly. The great merit of a (3)______
crowd is that its members remain individuals. It is (4)______ characteristic of the British
culture that British people can collect in crowds (5)______ do not turn into mobs.
SubQuestion No : 23
Q.23 Select the most appropriate option to fill in the blank No. 3.

Option:
1. Indian
2. Asian
3. French
4. British
Comprehension:
In the following passage some words have been deleted. Fill in the blanks with the help of the
alternatives given. Select the most appropriate option for each number.
The endurance of the crowds lining the Coronation route was most commendable. Soaked,
chilled and sleepless, (1)______ remained wonderfully good-tempered and when the
procession finally (2)______ they cheered whole-heartedly. The great merit of a (3)______
crowd is that its members remain individuals. It is (4)______ characteristic of the British
culture that British people can collect in crowds (5)______ do not turn into mobs.
SubQuestion No : 24
Q.24 Select the most appropriate option to fill in the blank No. 4.

Option:
1. moreover
2. perhaps
3. only
4. therefore
Comprehension:
In the following passage some words have been deleted. Fill in the blanks with the help of the
alternatives given. Select the most appropriate option for each number.
The endurance of the crowds lining the Coronation route was most commendable. Soaked,
chilled and sleepless, (1)______ remained wonderfully good-tempered and when the
procession finally (2)______ they cheered whole-heartedly. The great merit of a (3)______
crowd is that its members remain individuals. It is (4)______ characteristic of the British
culture that British people can collect in crowds (5)______ do not turn into mobs.
SubQuestion No : 25
Q.25 Select the most appropriate option to fill in the blank No. 5.

Option:
1. whom
2. which
3. who
4. what
Comprehension:
Read the following passage and answer the questions given after it.
Since September, at least 25 people have died and thousands have been made homeless.
Every state and territory in Australia has experienced fires this summer. But the biggest fires
burn along stretches of the eastern and southern coast, where most of the population lives.
This includes areas around Sydney and Adelaide.
More than 6.3 million hectares (63,000 sq km or 15.6 million acres) have been burned so far –
one hectare is roughly the size of a sports field. To put that in perspective, around 800,000
hectares were engulfed in a bush fire in 2018 in California.
Australia has always experienced bushfires – it has a "fire season". But this year they are a lot
worse than normal.
Fires are usually caused by lightning strikes or accidentally by a spark – but some fires are
also started deliberately. This year, a natural weather phenomenon known as the ‘Indian
Ocean Dipole’ has meant a hot, dry spell across the country. This year, Australia twice set a
new temperature record: an average maximum of 41.9°C was recorded on 18 December.
That comes on top of a long period of drought.
Scientists have long warned that this hotter, drier climate will contribute to fires becoming
more frequent and more intense.
The more extreme weather patterns and higher temperatures increase the risk of bushfires
and allow them to spread faster and wider.
Fire fighters are spraying water and fire retardant from planes and helicopters as well as from
the ground. But fighting bush fires is extremely difficult and often authorities have to focus on
just stopping the spread, rather than putting the fire out. The spread can for instance be best
contained by digging earth boundaries to stop the flames from spreading. The priority is
saving lives.
Professional fire fighters are the first in line to battle the flames, but they are outnumbered by
the thousands of volunteers. Three of them have died. There's also help coming from abroad:
the US, Canada and New Zealand have sent fire fighters to help. Australia's police, military
and navy are involved in rescue and evacuation efforts.
While people can flee the fires and are being evacuated if need be, the flames are
devastating wildlife in the affected areas. One study estimated that half a billion animals have
died in New South Wales alone.
Zookeepers take animals home to save them from fire, but the fires don't only kill animals
directly, they also destroy the habitat, leaving the survivors vulnerable even when the fires
have gone. So the true scale of loss isn't yet clear.
Experts say more than 100,000 cows and sheep may also have been lost, which is
devastating for farmers.
Each state runs its own emergency operation, but Prime Minister Scott Morrison has
promised better funding for fire-fighting and payouts for volunteer fire fighters, and an
additional A$2billion ($1.4billion; £1billion) for the recovery.
But the national government has come under strong criticism from its opponents that it has
not been doing enough against climate change. The country is one of the world's biggest per
capita greenhouse gas emitters but under international agreements it has committed itself to
reduction targets.
SubQuestion No : 26
Q.26 “Authorities have to focus on just stopping the spread, rather than putting the fire
out.” This means that the authorities:

Option:
1. want only to slow down the spread of fire
2. do not want to put the fires out
3. want to stop the fires from spreading first and then put them out
4. want to put out the fires once and for all
Comprehension:
Read the following passage and answer the questions given after it.
Since September, at least 25 people have died and thousands have been made homeless.
Every state and territory in Australia has experienced fires this summer. But the biggest fires
burn along stretches of the eastern and southern coast, where most of the population lives.
This includes areas around Sydney and Adelaide.
More than 6.3 million hectares (63,000 sq km or 15.6 million acres) have been burned so far –
one hectare is roughly the size of a sports field. To put that in perspective, around 800,000
hectares were engulfed in a bush fire in 2018 in California.
Australia has always experienced bushfires – it has a "fire season". But this year they are a lot
worse than normal.
Fires are usually caused by lightning strikes or accidentally by a spark – but some fires are
also started deliberately. This year, a natural weather phenomenon known as the ‘Indian
Ocean Dipole’ has meant a hot, dry spell across the country. This year, Australia twice set a
new temperature record: an average maximum of 41.9°C was recorded on 18 December.
That comes on top of a long period of drought.
Scientists have long warned that this hotter, drier climate will contribute to fires becoming
more frequent and more intense.
The more extreme weather patterns and higher temperatures increase the risk of bushfires
and allow them to spread faster and wider.
Fire fighters are spraying water and fire retardant from planes and helicopters as well as from
the ground. But fighting bush fires is extremely difficult and often authorities have to focus on
just stopping the spread, rather than putting the fire out. The spread can for instance be best
contained by digging earth boundaries to stop the flames from spreading. The priority is
saving lives.
Professional fire fighters are the first in line to battle the flames, but they are outnumbered by
the thousands of volunteers. Three of them have died. There's also help coming from abroad:
the US, Canada and New Zealand have sent fire fighters to help. Australia's police, military
and navy are involved in rescue and evacuation efforts.
While people can flee the fires and are being evacuated if need be, the flames are
devastating wildlife in the affected areas. One study estimated that half a billion animals have
died in New South Wales alone.
Zookeepers take animals home to save them from fire, but the fires don't only kill animals
directly, they also destroy the habitat, leaving the survivors vulnerable even when the fires
have gone. So the true scale of loss isn't yet clear.
Experts say more than 100,000 cows and sheep may also have been lost, which is
devastating for farmers.
Each state runs its own emergency operation, but Prime Minister Scott Morrison has
promised better funding for fire-fighting and payouts for volunteer fire fighters, and an
additional A$2billion ($1.4billion; £1billion) for the recovery.
But the national government has come under strong criticism from its opponents that it has
not been doing enough against climate change. The country is one of the world's biggest per
capita greenhouse gas emitters but under international agreements it has committed itself to
reduction targets.
SubQuestion No : 27
Q.27 What is the long lasting damage that the bush fires have caused to the wildlife in
Australia?

Option:
1. The fires have not only killed animals directly, but also destroyed their habitat.
2. Many animals in the zoos have been killed.
3. Half a billion animals have died in New South Wales alone. 
4. More than 100,000 cows and sheep may have been lost.
Comprehension:
Read the following passage and answer the questions given after it.
Since September, at least 25 people have died and thousands have been made homeless.
Every state and territory in Australia has experienced fires this summer. But the biggest fires
burn along stretches of the eastern and southern coast, where most of the population lives.
This includes areas around Sydney and Adelaide.
More than 6.3 million hectares (63,000 sq km or 15.6 million acres) have been burned so far –
one hectare is roughly the size of a sports field. To put that in perspective, around 800,000
hectares were engulfed in a bush fire in 2018 in California.
Australia has always experienced bushfires – it has a "fire season". But this year they are a lot
worse than normal.
Fires are usually caused by lightning strikes or accidentally by a spark – but some fires are
also started deliberately. This year, a natural weather phenomenon known as the ‘Indian
Ocean Dipole’ has meant a hot, dry spell across the country. This year, Australia twice set a
new temperature record: an average maximum of 41.9°C was recorded on 18 December.
That comes on top of a long period of drought.
Scientists have long warned that this hotter, drier climate will contribute to fires becoming
more frequent and more intense.
The more extreme weather patterns and higher temperatures increase the risk of bushfires
and allow them to spread faster and wider.
Fire fighters are spraying water and fire retardant from planes and helicopters as well as from
the ground. But fighting bush fires is extremely difficult and often authorities have to focus on
just stopping the spread, rather than putting the fire out. The spread can for instance be best
contained by digging earth boundaries to stop the flames from spreading. The priority is
saving lives.
Professional fire fighters are the first in line to battle the flames, but they are outnumbered by
the thousands of volunteers. Three of them have died. There's also help coming from abroad:
the US, Canada and New Zealand have sent fire fighters to help. Australia's police, military
and navy are involved in rescue and evacuation efforts.
While people can flee the fires and are being evacuated if need be, the flames are
devastating wildlife in the affected areas. One study estimated that half a billion animals have
died in New South Wales alone.
Zookeepers take animals home to save them from fire, but the fires don't only kill animals
directly, they also destroy the habitat, leaving the survivors vulnerable even when the fires
have gone. So the true scale of loss isn't yet clear.
Experts say more than 100,000 cows and sheep may also have been lost, which is
devastating for farmers.
Each state runs its own emergency operation, but Prime Minister Scott Morrison has
promised better funding for fire-fighting and payouts for volunteer fire fighters, and an
additional A$2billion ($1.4billion; £1billion) for the recovery.
But the national government has come under strong criticism from its opponents that it has
not been doing enough against climate change. The country is one of the world's biggest per
capita greenhouse gas emitters but under international agreements it has committed itself to
reduction targets.
SubQuestion No : 28
Q.28 Which of the following countries has NOT sent help for firefighting?

Option:
1. China
2. The US
3. Canada
4. New Zealand
Comprehension:
Read the following passage and answer the questions given after it.
Since September, at least 25 people have died and thousands have been made homeless.
Every state and territory in Australia has experienced fires this summer. But the biggest fires
burn along stretches of the eastern and southern coast, where most of the population lives.
This includes areas around Sydney and Adelaide.
More than 6.3 million hectares (63,000 sq km or 15.6 million acres) have been burned so far –
one hectare is roughly the size of a sports field. To put that in perspective, around 800,000
hectares were engulfed in a bush fire in 2018 in California.
Australia has always experienced bushfires – it has a "fire season". But this year they are a lot
worse than normal.
Fires are usually caused by lightning strikes or accidentally by a spark – but some fires are
also started deliberately. This year, a natural weather phenomenon known as the ‘Indian
Ocean Dipole’ has meant a hot, dry spell across the country. This year, Australia twice set a
new temperature record: an average maximum of 41.9°C was recorded on 18 December.
That comes on top of a long period of drought.
Scientists have long warned that this hotter, drier climate will contribute to fires becoming
more frequent and more intense.
The more extreme weather patterns and higher temperatures increase the risk of bushfires
and allow them to spread faster and wider.
Fire fighters are spraying water and fire retardant from planes and helicopters as well as from
the ground. But fighting bush fires is extremely difficult and often authorities have to focus on
just stopping the spread, rather than putting the fire out. The spread can for instance be best
contained by digging earth boundaries to stop the flames from spreading. The priority is
saving lives.
Professional fire fighters are the first in line to battle the flames, but they are outnumbered by
the thousands of volunteers. Three of them have died. There's also help coming from abroad:
the US, Canada and New Zealand have sent fire fighters to help. Australia's police, military
and navy are involved in rescue and evacuation efforts.
While people can flee the fires and are being evacuated if need be, the flames are
devastating wildlife in the affected areas. One study estimated that half a billion animals have
died in New South Wales alone.
Zookeepers take animals home to save them from fire, but the fires don't only kill animals
directly, they also destroy the habitat, leaving the survivors vulnerable even when the fires
have gone. So the true scale of loss isn't yet clear.
Experts say more than 100,000 cows and sheep may also have been lost, which is
devastating for farmers.
Each state runs its own emergency operation, but Prime Minister Scott Morrison has
promised better funding for fire-fighting and payouts for volunteer fire fighters, and an
additional A$2billion ($1.4billion; £1billion) for the recovery.
But the national government has come under strong criticism from its opponents that it has
not been doing enough against climate change. The country is one of the world's biggest per
capita greenhouse gas emitters but under international agreements it has committed itself to
reduction targets.
SubQuestion No : 29
Q.29  “Some fires are also started deliberately”. ‘Deliberately’ here means:

Option:
1. inadvertently
2. accidentally
3. unknowingly
4. purposely
Comprehension:
Read the following passage and answer the questions given after it.
Since September, at least 25 people have died and thousands have been made homeless.
Every state and territory in Australia has experienced fires this summer. But the biggest fires
burn along stretches of the eastern and southern coast, where most of the population lives.
This includes areas around Sydney and Adelaide.
More than 6.3 million hectares (63,000 sq km or 15.6 million acres) have been burned so far –
one hectare is roughly the size of a sports field. To put that in perspective, around 800,000
hectares were engulfed in a bush fire in 2018 in California.
Australia has always experienced bushfires – it has a "fire season". But this year they are a lot
worse than normal.
Fires are usually caused by lightning strikes or accidentally by a spark – but some fires are
also started deliberately. This year, a natural weather phenomenon known as the ‘Indian
Ocean Dipole’ has meant a hot, dry spell across the country. This year, Australia twice set a
new temperature record: an average maximum of 41.9°C was recorded on 18 December.
That comes on top of a long period of drought.
Scientists have long warned that this hotter, drier climate will contribute to fires becoming
more frequent and more intense.
The more extreme weather patterns and higher temperatures increase the risk of bushfires
and allow them to spread faster and wider.
Fire fighters are spraying water and fire retardant from planes and helicopters as well as from
the ground. But fighting bush fires is extremely difficult and often authorities have to focus on
just stopping the spread, rather than putting the fire out. The spread can for instance be best
contained by digging earth boundaries to stop the flames from spreading. The priority is
saving lives.
Professional fire fighters are the first in line to battle the flames, but they are outnumbered by
the thousands of volunteers. Three of them have died. There's also help coming from abroad:
the US, Canada and New Zealand have sent fire fighters to help. Australia's police, military
and navy are involved in rescue and evacuation efforts.
While people can flee the fires and are being evacuated if need be, the flames are
devastating wildlife in the affected areas. One study estimated that half a billion animals have
died in New South Wales alone.
Zookeepers take animals home to save them from fire, but the fires don't only kill animals
directly, they also destroy the habitat, leaving the survivors vulnerable even when the fires
have gone. So the true scale of loss isn't yet clear.
Experts say more than 100,000 cows and sheep may also have been lost, which is
devastating for farmers.
Each state runs its own emergency operation, but Prime Minister Scott Morrison has
promised better funding for fire-fighting and payouts for volunteer fire fighters, and an
additional A$2billion ($1.4billion; £1billion) for the recovery.
But the national government has come under strong criticism from its opponents that it has
not been doing enough against climate change. The country is one of the world's biggest per
capita greenhouse gas emitters but under international agreements it has committed itself to
reduction targets.
SubQuestion No : 30
Q.30 The passage is mainly about:

Option:
1. Australia’s struggle with bush fires
2. how the bush fires occur in Australia
3. the government’s role in dealing with the bushfire
4. the loss of wildlife due to bush fires
Comprehension:
Read the following passage and answer the questions given after it.
Since September, at least 25 people have died and thousands have been made homeless.
Every state and territory in Australia has experienced fires this summer. But the biggest fires
burn along stretches of the eastern and southern coast, where most of the population lives.
This includes areas around Sydney and Adelaide.
More than 6.3 million hectares (63,000 sq km or 15.6 million acres) have been burned so far –
one hectare is roughly the size of a sports field. To put that in perspective, around 800,000
hectares were engulfed in a bush fire in 2018 in California.
Australia has always experienced bushfires – it has a "fire season". But this year they are a lot
worse than normal.
Fires are usually caused by lightning strikes or accidentally by a spark – but some fires are
also started deliberately. This year, a natural weather phenomenon known as the ‘Indian
Ocean Dipole’ has meant a hot, dry spell across the country. This year, Australia twice set a
new temperature record: an average maximum of 41.9°C was recorded on 18 December.
That comes on top of a long period of drought.
Scientists have long warned that this hotter, drier climate will contribute to fires becoming
more frequent and more intense.
The more extreme weather patterns and higher temperatures increase the risk of bushfires
and allow them to spread faster and wider.
Fire fighters are spraying water and fire retardant from planes and helicopters as well as from
the ground. But fighting bush fires is extremely difficult and often authorities have to focus on
just stopping the spread, rather than putting the fire out. The spread can for instance be best
contained by digging earth boundaries to stop the flames from spreading. The priority is
saving lives.
Professional fire fighters are the first in line to battle the flames, but they are outnumbered by
the thousands of volunteers. Three of them have died. There's also help coming from abroad:
the US, Canada and New Zealand have sent fire fighters to help. Australia's police, military
and navy are involved in rescue and evacuation efforts.
While people can flee the fires and are being evacuated if need be, the flames are
devastating wildlife in the affected areas. One study estimated that half a billion animals have
died in New South Wales alone.
Zookeepers take animals home to save them from fire, but the fires don't only kill animals
directly, they also destroy the habitat, leaving the survivors vulnerable even when the fires
have gone. So the true scale of loss isn't yet clear.
Experts say more than 100,000 cows and sheep may also have been lost, which is
devastating for farmers.
Each state runs its own emergency operation, but Prime Minister Scott Morrison has
promised better funding for fire-fighting and payouts for volunteer fire fighters, and an
additional A$2billion ($1.4billion; £1billion) for the recovery.
But the national government has come under strong criticism from its opponents that it has
not been doing enough against climate change. The country is one of the world's biggest per
capita greenhouse gas emitters but under international agreements it has committed itself to
reduction targets.
SubQuestion No : 31
Q.31 It can be inferred from the passage that this year’s fire in Australia is mostly a result of:

Option:
1. a lightning strike
2. an accidental spark in the jungle
3. a result of an extraordinarily hot and dry spell
4. a deliberate attempt to put the forests on fire
Comprehension:
Read the following passage and answer the questions given after it.
Since September, at least 25 people have died and thousands have been made homeless.
Every state and territory in Australia has experienced fires this summer. But the biggest fires
burn along stretches of the eastern and southern coast, where most of the population lives.
This includes areas around Sydney and Adelaide.
More than 6.3 million hectares (63,000 sq km or 15.6 million acres) have been burned so far –
one hectare is roughly the size of a sports field. To put that in perspective, around 800,000
hectares were engulfed in a bush fire in 2018 in California.
Australia has always experienced bushfires – it has a "fire season". But this year they are a lot
worse than normal.
Fires are usually caused by lightning strikes or accidentally by a spark – but some fires are
also started deliberately. This year, a natural weather phenomenon known as the ‘Indian
Ocean Dipole’ has meant a hot, dry spell across the country. This year, Australia twice set a
new temperature record: an average maximum of 41.9°C was recorded on 18 December.
That comes on top of a long period of drought.
Scientists have long warned that this hotter, drier climate will contribute to fires becoming
more frequent and more intense.
The more extreme weather patterns and higher temperatures increase the risk of bushfires
and allow them to spread faster and wider.
Fire fighters are spraying water and fire retardant from planes and helicopters as well as from
the ground. But fighting bush fires is extremely difficult and often authorities have to focus on
just stopping the spread, rather than putting the fire out. The spread can for instance be best
contained by digging earth boundaries to stop the flames from spreading. The priority is
saving lives.
Professional fire fighters are the first in line to battle the flames, but they are outnumbered by
the thousands of volunteers. Three of them have died. There's also help coming from abroad:
the US, Canada and New Zealand have sent fire fighters to help. Australia's police, military
and navy are involved in rescue and evacuation efforts.
While people can flee the fires and are being evacuated if need be, the flames are
devastating wildlife in the affected areas. One study estimated that half a billion animals have
died in New South Wales alone.
Zookeepers take animals home to save them from fire, but the fires don't only kill animals
directly, they also destroy the habitat, leaving the survivors vulnerable even when the fires
have gone. So the true scale of loss isn't yet clear.
Experts say more than 100,000 cows and sheep may also have been lost, which is
devastating for farmers.
Each state runs its own emergency operation, but Prime Minister Scott Morrison has
promised better funding for fire-fighting and payouts for volunteer fire fighters, and an
additional A$2billion ($1.4billion; £1billion) for the recovery.
But the national government has come under strong criticism from its opponents that it has
not been doing enough against climate change. The country is one of the world's biggest per
capita greenhouse gas emitters but under international agreements it has committed itself to
reduction targets.
SubQuestion No : 32
Q.32 Which statement is NOT true according to the passage?

Option:
1. Zookeepers take animals home to save them from fire. 
2. The volunteers outnumber the professional fire fighters in Australia.
3. Around 800,000 hectares have been destroyed due to a bush fire in Australia.
4. Australia is one of the world's biggest per capita greenhouse gas emitters.
Comprehension:
Read the following passage and answer the questions given after it.
Since September, at least 25 people have died and thousands have been made homeless.
Every state and territory in Australia has experienced fires this summer. But the biggest fires
burn along stretches of the eastern and southern coast, where most of the population lives.
This includes areas around Sydney and Adelaide.
More than 6.3 million hectares (63,000 sq km or 15.6 million acres) have been burned so far –
one hectare is roughly the size of a sports field. To put that in perspective, around 800,000
hectares were engulfed in a bush fire in 2018 in California.
Australia has always experienced bushfires – it has a "fire season". But this year they are a lot
worse than normal.
Fires are usually caused by lightning strikes or accidentally by a spark – but some fires are
also started deliberately. This year, a natural weather phenomenon known as the ‘Indian
Ocean Dipole’ has meant a hot, dry spell across the country. This year, Australia twice set a
new temperature record: an average maximum of 41.9°C was recorded on 18 December.
That comes on top of a long period of drought.
Scientists have long warned that this hotter, drier climate will contribute to fires becoming
more frequent and more intense.
The more extreme weather patterns and higher temperatures increase the risk of bushfires
and allow them to spread faster and wider.
Fire fighters are spraying water and fire retardant from planes and helicopters as well as from
the ground. But fighting bush fires is extremely difficult and often authorities have to focus on
just stopping the spread, rather than putting the fire out. The spread can for instance be best
contained by digging earth boundaries to stop the flames from spreading. The priority is
saving lives.
Professional fire fighters are the first in line to battle the flames, but they are outnumbered by
the thousands of volunteers. Three of them have died. There's also help coming from abroad:
the US, Canada and New Zealand have sent fire fighters to help. Australia's police, military
and navy are involved in rescue and evacuation efforts.
While people can flee the fires and are being evacuated if need be, the flames are
devastating wildlife in the affected areas. One study estimated that half a billion animals have
died in New South Wales alone.
Zookeepers take animals home to save them from fire, but the fires don't only kill animals
directly, they also destroy the habitat, leaving the survivors vulnerable even when the fires
have gone. So the true scale of loss isn't yet clear.
Experts say more than 100,000 cows and sheep may also have been lost, which is
devastating for farmers.
Each state runs its own emergency operation, but Prime Minister Scott Morrison has
promised better funding for fire-fighting and payouts for volunteer fire fighters, and an
additional A$2billion ($1.4billion; £1billion) for the recovery.
But the national government has come under strong criticism from its opponents that it has
not been doing enough against climate change. The country is one of the world's biggest per
capita greenhouse gas emitters but under international agreements it has committed itself to
reduction targets.
SubQuestion No : 33
Q.33 The opposition in Australia is criticising the government for:

Option:
1. not fighting the bush fires
2. not allotting enough funds for firefighting
3. not doing enough against the climate change
4. not giving enough compensation to the deceased
Comprehension:
Read the following passage and answer the questions given after it.
Since September, at least 25 people have died and thousands have been made homeless.
Every state and territory in Australia has experienced fires this summer. But the biggest fires
burn along stretches of the eastern and southern coast, where most of the population lives.
This includes areas around Sydney and Adelaide.
More than 6.3 million hectares (63,000 sq km or 15.6 million acres) have been burned so far –
one hectare is roughly the size of a sports field. To put that in perspective, around 800,000
hectares were engulfed in a bush fire in 2018 in California.
Australia has always experienced bushfires – it has a "fire season". But this year they are a lot
worse than normal.
Fires are usually caused by lightning strikes or accidentally by a spark – but some fires are
also started deliberately. This year, a natural weather phenomenon known as the ‘Indian
Ocean Dipole’ has meant a hot, dry spell across the country. This year, Australia twice set a
new temperature record: an average maximum of 41.9°C was recorded on 18 December.
That comes on top of a long period of drought.
Scientists have long warned that this hotter, drier climate will contribute to fires becoming
more frequent and more intense.
The more extreme weather patterns and higher temperatures increase the risk of bushfires
and allow them to spread faster and wider.
Fire fighters are spraying water and fire retardant from planes and helicopters as well as from
the ground. But fighting bush fires is extremely difficult and often authorities have to focus on
just stopping the spread, rather than putting the fire out. The spread can for instance be best
contained by digging earth boundaries to stop the flames from spreading. The priority is
saving lives.
Professional fire fighters are the first in line to battle the flames, but they are outnumbered by
the thousands of volunteers. Three of them have died. There's also help coming from abroad:
the US, Canada and New Zealand have sent fire fighters to help. Australia's police, military
and navy are involved in rescue and evacuation efforts.
While people can flee the fires and are being evacuated if need be, the flames are
devastating wildlife in the affected areas. One study estimated that half a billion animals have
died in New South Wales alone.
Zookeepers take animals home to save them from fire, but the fires don't only kill animals
directly, they also destroy the habitat, leaving the survivors vulnerable even when the fires
have gone. So the true scale of loss isn't yet clear.
Experts say more than 100,000 cows and sheep may also have been lost, which is
devastating for farmers.
Each state runs its own emergency operation, but Prime Minister Scott Morrison has
promised better funding for fire-fighting and payouts for volunteer fire fighters, and an
additional A$2billion ($1.4billion; £1billion) for the recovery.
But the national government has come under strong criticism from its opponents that it has
not been doing enough against climate change. The country is one of the world's biggest per
capita greenhouse gas emitters but under international agreements it has committed itself to
reduction targets.
SubQuestion No : 34
Q.34 The spread of fire can be contained effectively by:

Option:
1. digging earth boundaries
2. spraying fire retardant from the ground
3. spraying fire retardant from the air
4. spraying the forests with water
Comprehension:
Read the following passage and answer the questions given after it.
Since September, at least 25 people have died and thousands have been made homeless.
Every state and territory in Australia has experienced fires this summer. But the biggest fires
burn along stretches of the eastern and southern coast, where most of the population lives.
This includes areas around Sydney and Adelaide.
More than 6.3 million hectares (63,000 sq km or 15.6 million acres) have been burned so far –
one hectare is roughly the size of a sports field. To put that in perspective, around 800,000
hectares were engulfed in a bush fire in 2018 in California.
Australia has always experienced bushfires – it has a "fire season". But this year they are a lot
worse than normal.
Fires are usually caused by lightning strikes or accidentally by a spark – but some fires are
also started deliberately. This year, a natural weather phenomenon known as the ‘Indian
Ocean Dipole’ has meant a hot, dry spell across the country. This year, Australia twice set a
new temperature record: an average maximum of 41.9°C was recorded on 18 December.
That comes on top of a long period of drought.
Scientists have long warned that this hotter, drier climate will contribute to fires becoming
more frequent and more intense.
The more extreme weather patterns and higher temperatures increase the risk of bushfires
and allow them to spread faster and wider.
Fire fighters are spraying water and fire retardant from planes and helicopters as well as from
the ground. But fighting bush fires is extremely difficult and often authorities have to focus on
just stopping the spread, rather than putting the fire out. The spread can for instance be best
contained by digging earth boundaries to stop the flames from spreading. The priority is
saving lives.
Professional fire fighters are the first in line to battle the flames, but they are outnumbered by
the thousands of volunteers. Three of them have died. There's also help coming from abroad:
the US, Canada and New Zealand have sent fire fighters to help. Australia's police, military
and navy are involved in rescue and evacuation efforts.
While people can flee the fires and are being evacuated if need be, the flames are
devastating wildlife in the affected areas. One study estimated that half a billion animals have
died in New South Wales alone.
Zookeepers take animals home to save them from fire, but the fires don't only kill animals
directly, they also destroy the habitat, leaving the survivors vulnerable even when the fires
have gone. So the true scale of loss isn't yet clear.
Experts say more than 100,000 cows and sheep may also have been lost, which is
devastating for farmers.
Each state runs its own emergency operation, but Prime Minister Scott Morrison has
promised better funding for fire-fighting and payouts for volunteer fire fighters, and an
additional A$2billion ($1.4billion; £1billion) for the recovery.
But the national government has come under strong criticism from its opponents that it has
not been doing enough against climate change. The country is one of the world's biggest per
capita greenhouse gas emitters but under international agreements it has committed itself to
reduction targets.
SubQuestion No : 35
Q.35 Where did the biggest fires burn in Australia?

Option:
1. Along the western and southern coasts
2. Along the eastern and northern coasts
3. Along the western and northern coasts
4. Along the eastern and southern coasts
Comprehension:
Read the following passage and answer the questions given after it.
The Celts who lived in Britain before the Roman invasion of 43 AD could be said to have
created the first towns. Celts in southern England lived in hill forts, which were quite large
settlements. (Some probably had thousands of inhabitants). They were places of trade, where
people bought and sold goods and also places where craftsmen worked. The Romans called
them oppida.
However, the Romans created the first settlements that were undoubtedly towns. Roman
towns were usually laid out in a grid pattern. In the centre was the forum or market place. It
was lined with public buildings. Life in Roman towns was highly civilized with public baths and
temples.
From the 5th century Angles, Saxons and Jutes invaded England. At first, the invaders
avoided living in towns. However, as trade grew some towns grew up. London revived by the
7th century (although the Saxon town was, at first, outside the walls of the old Roman town).
Southampton was founded at the end of the 7th century. Hereford was founded in the 8th
century. Furthermore, Ipswich grew up in the 8th century and York revived.
However, towns were rare in Saxon England until the late 9th century. At that time, Alfred the
Great created a network of fortified settlements across his kingdom called ‘burhs’. In the event
of a Danish attack, men could gather in the local burh. However, burhs were more than forts.
They were also market towns. Some burhs were started from scratch but many were created
out of the ruins of old Roman towns. Places like Winchester rose, phoenix-like, from the
ashes of history.
The thing that would strike us most about medieval towns would be their small size.
Winchester, the capital of England, probably had about 8,000 people. At that time a 'large'
town, like Lincoln or Dublin had about 4,000 or 5,000 inhabitants and a 'medium sized' town,
like Colchester had about 2,500 people. Many towns were much smaller.
However, during the 12th and 13th centuries most towns grew much larger. Furthermore,
many new towns were created across Britain. Trade and commerce were increasing and
there was a need for new towns. Some were created from existing villages but some were
created from scratch. In those days you could create a town simply by starting a market.
There were few shops so if you wished to buy or sell anything you had to go to a market.
Once one was up and running, craftsmen and merchants would come to live in the area and a
town would grow.
SubQuestion No : 36
Q.36 Match the words with their meaning.

a. founded 1. protected
b. declined 2. created
c. fortified 3. dwindled

Option:
1. a-1, b-3, c-2
2. a-2, b-3, c-1
3. a-3, b-2, c-1
4. a-2, b-1, c-3
Comprehension:
Read the following passage and answer the questions given after it.
The Celts who lived in Britain before the Roman invasion of 43 AD could be said to have
created the first towns. Celts in southern England lived in hill forts, which were quite large
settlements. (Some probably had thousands of inhabitants). They were places of trade, where
people bought and sold goods and also places where craftsmen worked. The Romans called
them oppida.
However, the Romans created the first settlements that were undoubtedly towns. Roman
towns were usually laid out in a grid pattern. In the centre was the forum or market place. It
was lined with public buildings. Life in Roman towns was highly civilized with public baths and
temples.
From the 5th century Angles, Saxons and Jutes invaded England. At first, the invaders
avoided living in towns. However, as trade grew some towns grew up. London revived by the
7th century (although the Saxon town was, at first, outside the walls of the old Roman town).
Southampton was founded at the end of the 7th century. Hereford was founded in the 8th
century. Furthermore, Ipswich grew up in the 8th century and York revived.
However, towns were rare in Saxon England until the late 9th century. At that time, Alfred the
Great created a network of fortified settlements across his kingdom called ‘burhs’. In the event
of a Danish attack, men could gather in the local burh. However, burhs were more than forts.
They were also market towns. Some burhs were started from scratch but many were created
out of the ruins of old Roman towns. Places like Winchester rose, phoenix-like, from the
ashes of history.
The thing that would strike us most about medieval towns would be their small size.
Winchester, the capital of England, probably had about 8,000 people. At that time a 'large'
town, like Lincoln or Dublin had about 4,000 or 5,000 inhabitants and a 'medium sized' town,
like Colchester had about 2,500 people. Many towns were much smaller.
However, during the 12th and 13th centuries most towns grew much larger. Furthermore,
many new towns were created across Britain. Trade and commerce were increasing and
there was a need for new towns. Some were created from existing villages but some were
created from scratch. In those days you could create a town simply by starting a market.
There were few shops so if you wished to buy or sell anything you had to go to a market.
Once one was up and running, craftsmen and merchants would come to live in the area and a
town would grow.
SubQuestion No : 37
Q.37 Alfred the Great created fortified settlements across his kingdom mainly because:

Option:
1. people could live there
2. they provided shelter from Danish attacks
3. merchants could come and sell their goods there
4. craftsmen could craft their artefacts there
Comprehension:
Read the following passage and answer the questions given after it.
The Celts who lived in Britain before the Roman invasion of 43 AD could be said to have
created the first towns. Celts in southern England lived in hill forts, which were quite large
settlements. (Some probably had thousands of inhabitants). They were places of trade, where
people bought and sold goods and also places where craftsmen worked. The Romans called
them oppida.
However, the Romans created the first settlements that were undoubtedly towns. Roman
towns were usually laid out in a grid pattern. In the centre was the forum or market place. It
was lined with public buildings. Life in Roman towns was highly civilized with public baths and
temples.
From the 5th century Angles, Saxons and Jutes invaded England. At first, the invaders
avoided living in towns. However, as trade grew some towns grew up. London revived by the
7th century (although the Saxon town was, at first, outside the walls of the old Roman town).
Southampton was founded at the end of the 7th century. Hereford was founded in the 8th
century. Furthermore, Ipswich grew up in the 8th century and York revived.
However, towns were rare in Saxon England until the late 9th century. At that time, Alfred the
Great created a network of fortified settlements across his kingdom called ‘burhs’. In the event
of a Danish attack, men could gather in the local burh. However, burhs were more than forts.
They were also market towns. Some burhs were started from scratch but many were created
out of the ruins of old Roman towns. Places like Winchester rose, phoenix-like, from the
ashes of history.
The thing that would strike us most about medieval towns would be their small size.
Winchester, the capital of England, probably had about 8,000 people. At that time a 'large'
town, like Lincoln or Dublin had about 4,000 or 5,000 inhabitants and a 'medium sized' town,
like Colchester had about 2,500 people. Many towns were much smaller.
However, during the 12th and 13th centuries most towns grew much larger. Furthermore,
many new towns were created across Britain. Trade and commerce were increasing and
there was a need for new towns. Some were created from existing villages but some were
created from scratch. In those days you could create a town simply by starting a market.
There were few shops so if you wished to buy or sell anything you had to go to a market.
Once one was up and running, craftsmen and merchants would come to live in the area and a
town would grow.
SubQuestion No : 38
Q.38 The hill forts of Celts were called:

Option:
1. Oppida 
2. Burhs
3. Centres
4. Forums
Comprehension:
Read the following passage and answer the questions given after it.
The Celts who lived in Britain before the Roman invasion of 43 AD could be said to have
created the first towns. Celts in southern England lived in hill forts, which were quite large
settlements. (Some probably had thousands of inhabitants). They were places of trade, where
people bought and sold goods and also places where craftsmen worked. The Romans called
them oppida.
However, the Romans created the first settlements that were undoubtedly towns. Roman
towns were usually laid out in a grid pattern. In the centre was the forum or market place. It
was lined with public buildings. Life in Roman towns was highly civilized with public baths and
temples.
From the 5th century Angles, Saxons and Jutes invaded England. At first, the invaders
avoided living in towns. However, as trade grew some towns grew up. London revived by the
7th century (although the Saxon town was, at first, outside the walls of the old Roman town).
Southampton was founded at the end of the 7th century. Hereford was founded in the 8th
century. Furthermore, Ipswich grew up in the 8th century and York revived.
However, towns were rare in Saxon England until the late 9th century. At that time, Alfred the
Great created a network of fortified settlements across his kingdom called ‘burhs’. In the event
of a Danish attack, men could gather in the local burh. However, burhs were more than forts.
They were also market towns. Some burhs were started from scratch but many were created
out of the ruins of old Roman towns. Places like Winchester rose, phoenix-like, from the
ashes of history.
The thing that would strike us most about medieval towns would be their small size.
Winchester, the capital of England, probably had about 8,000 people. At that time a 'large'
town, like Lincoln or Dublin had about 4,000 or 5,000 inhabitants and a 'medium sized' town,
like Colchester had about 2,500 people. Many towns were much smaller.
However, during the 12th and 13th centuries most towns grew much larger. Furthermore,
many new towns were created across Britain. Trade and commerce were increasing and
there was a need for new towns. Some were created from existing villages but some were
created from scratch. In those days you could create a town simply by starting a market.
There were few shops so if you wished to buy or sell anything you had to go to a market.
Once one was up and running, craftsmen and merchants would come to live in the area and a
town would grow.
SubQuestion No : 39
Q.39 Who were the first creators of towns in England?

Option:
1. Celts
2. Angles
3. Saxons
4. Romans
Comprehension:
Read the following passage and answer the questions given after it.
The Celts who lived in Britain before the Roman invasion of 43 AD could be said to have
created the first towns. Celts in southern England lived in hill forts, which were quite large
settlements. (Some probably had thousands of inhabitants). They were places of trade, where
people bought and sold goods and also places where craftsmen worked. The Romans called
them oppida.
However, the Romans created the first settlements that were undoubtedly towns. Roman
towns were usually laid out in a grid pattern. In the centre was the forum or market place. It
was lined with public buildings. Life in Roman towns was highly civilized with public baths and
temples.
From the 5th century Angles, Saxons and Jutes invaded England. At first, the invaders
avoided living in towns. However, as trade grew some towns grew up. London revived by the
7th century (although the Saxon town was, at first, outside the walls of the old Roman town).
Southampton was founded at the end of the 7th century. Hereford was founded in the 8th
century. Furthermore, Ipswich grew up in the 8th century and York revived.
However, towns were rare in Saxon England until the late 9th century. At that time, Alfred the
Great created a network of fortified settlements across his kingdom called ‘burhs’. In the event
of a Danish attack, men could gather in the local burh. However, burhs were more than forts.
They were also market towns. Some burhs were started from scratch but many were created
out of the ruins of old Roman towns. Places like Winchester rose, phoenix-like, from the
ashes of history.
The thing that would strike us most about medieval towns would be their small size.
Winchester, the capital of England, probably had about 8,000 people. At that time a 'large'
town, like Lincoln or Dublin had about 4,000 or 5,000 inhabitants and a 'medium sized' town,
like Colchester had about 2,500 people. Many towns were much smaller.
However, during the 12th and 13th centuries most towns grew much larger. Furthermore,
many new towns were created across Britain. Trade and commerce were increasing and
there was a need for new towns. Some were created from existing villages but some were
created from scratch. In those days you could create a town simply by starting a market.
There were few shops so if you wished to buy or sell anything you had to go to a market.
Once one was up and running, craftsmen and merchants would come to live in the area and a
town would grow.
SubQuestion No : 40
Q.40 “Some were created from scratch.” The towns which started from scratch were created
by first:

Option:
1. starting a market
2. establishing a settlement
3. building houses
4. building a fort
Comprehension:
Read the following passage and answer the questions given after it.
The Celts who lived in Britain before the Roman invasion of 43 AD could be said to have
created the first towns. Celts in southern England lived in hill forts, which were quite large
settlements. (Some probably had thousands of inhabitants). They were places of trade, where
people bought and sold goods and also places where craftsmen worked. The Romans called
them oppida.
However, the Romans created the first settlements that were undoubtedly towns. Roman
towns were usually laid out in a grid pattern. In the centre was the forum or market place. It
was lined with public buildings. Life in Roman towns was highly civilized with public baths and
temples.
From the 5th century Angles, Saxons and Jutes invaded England. At first, the invaders
avoided living in towns. However, as trade grew some towns grew up. London revived by the
7th century (although the Saxon town was, at first, outside the walls of the old Roman town).
Southampton was founded at the end of the 7th century. Hereford was founded in the 8th
century. Furthermore, Ipswich grew up in the 8th century and York revived.
However, towns were rare in Saxon England until the late 9th century. At that time, Alfred the
Great created a network of fortified settlements across his kingdom called ‘burhs’. In the event
of a Danish attack, men could gather in the local burh. However, burhs were more than forts.
They were also market towns. Some burhs were started from scratch but many were created
out of the ruins of old Roman towns. Places like Winchester rose, phoenix-like, from the
ashes of history.
The thing that would strike us most about medieval towns would be their small size.
Winchester, the capital of England, probably had about 8,000 people. At that time a 'large'
town, like Lincoln or Dublin had about 4,000 or 5,000 inhabitants and a 'medium sized' town,
like Colchester had about 2,500 people. Many towns were much smaller.
However, during the 12th and 13th centuries most towns grew much larger. Furthermore,
many new towns were created across Britain. Trade and commerce were increasing and
there was a need for new towns. Some were created from existing villages but some were
created from scratch. In those days you could create a town simply by starting a market.
There were few shops so if you wished to buy or sell anything you had to go to a market.
Once one was up and running, craftsmen and merchants would come to live in the area and a
town would grow.
SubQuestion No : 41
Q.41 Which of the following was the capital of England during medieval times?

Option:
1. Dublin
2. Winchester
3. London
4. Colchester
Comprehension:
Read the following passage and answer the questions given after it.
The Celts who lived in Britain before the Roman invasion of 43 AD could be said to have
created the first towns. Celts in southern England lived in hill forts, which were quite large
settlements. (Some probably had thousands of inhabitants). They were places of trade, where
people bought and sold goods and also places where craftsmen worked. The Romans called
them oppida.
However, the Romans created the first settlements that were undoubtedly towns. Roman
towns were usually laid out in a grid pattern. In the centre was the forum or market place. It
was lined with public buildings. Life in Roman towns was highly civilized with public baths and
temples.
From the 5th century Angles, Saxons and Jutes invaded England. At first, the invaders
avoided living in towns. However, as trade grew some towns grew up. London revived by the
7th century (although the Saxon town was, at first, outside the walls of the old Roman town).
Southampton was founded at the end of the 7th century. Hereford was founded in the 8th
century. Furthermore, Ipswich grew up in the 8th century and York revived.
However, towns were rare in Saxon England until the late 9th century. At that time, Alfred the
Great created a network of fortified settlements across his kingdom called ‘burhs’. In the event
of a Danish attack, men could gather in the local burh. However, burhs were more than forts.
They were also market towns. Some burhs were started from scratch but many were created
out of the ruins of old Roman towns. Places like Winchester rose, phoenix-like, from the
ashes of history.
The thing that would strike us most about medieval towns would be their small size.
Winchester, the capital of England, probably had about 8,000 people. At that time a 'large'
town, like Lincoln or Dublin had about 4,000 or 5,000 inhabitants and a 'medium sized' town,
like Colchester had about 2,500 people. Many towns were much smaller.
However, during the 12th and 13th centuries most towns grew much larger. Furthermore,
many new towns were created across Britain. Trade and commerce were increasing and
there was a need for new towns. Some were created from existing villages but some were
created from scratch. In those days you could create a town simply by starting a market.
There were few shops so if you wished to buy or sell anything you had to go to a market.
Once one was up and running, craftsmen and merchants would come to live in the area and a
town would grow.
SubQuestion No : 42
Q.42 What lay in the centre of Roman towns?

Option:
1. Market places
2. Residences
3. Temples
4. Baths
Comprehension:
Read the following passage and answer the questions given after it.
The Celts who lived in Britain before the Roman invasion of 43 AD could be said to have
created the first towns. Celts in southern England lived in hill forts, which were quite large
settlements. (Some probably had thousands of inhabitants). They were places of trade, where
people bought and sold goods and also places where craftsmen worked. The Romans called
them oppida.
However, the Romans created the first settlements that were undoubtedly towns. Roman
towns were usually laid out in a grid pattern. In the centre was the forum or market place. It
was lined with public buildings. Life in Roman towns was highly civilized with public baths and
temples.
From the 5th century Angles, Saxons and Jutes invaded England. At first, the invaders
avoided living in towns. However, as trade grew some towns grew up. London revived by the
7th century (although the Saxon town was, at first, outside the walls of the old Roman town).
Southampton was founded at the end of the 7th century. Hereford was founded in the 8th
century. Furthermore, Ipswich grew up in the 8th century and York revived.
However, towns were rare in Saxon England until the late 9th century. At that time, Alfred the
Great created a network of fortified settlements across his kingdom called ‘burhs’. In the event
of a Danish attack, men could gather in the local burh. However, burhs were more than forts.
They were also market towns. Some burhs were started from scratch but many were created
out of the ruins of old Roman towns. Places like Winchester rose, phoenix-like, from the
ashes of history.
The thing that would strike us most about medieval towns would be their small size.
Winchester, the capital of England, probably had about 8,000 people. At that time a 'large'
town, like Lincoln or Dublin had about 4,000 or 5,000 inhabitants and a 'medium sized' town,
like Colchester had about 2,500 people. Many towns were much smaller.
However, during the 12th and 13th centuries most towns grew much larger. Furthermore,
many new towns were created across Britain. Trade and commerce were increasing and
there was a need for new towns. Some were created from existing villages but some were
created from scratch. In those days you could create a town simply by starting a market.
There were few shops so if you wished to buy or sell anything you had to go to a market.
Once one was up and running, craftsmen and merchants would come to live in the area and a
town would grow.
SubQuestion No : 43
Q.43 “At first, the invaders avoided living in towns.” Who is/are being referred to here as
‘invaders’?

Option:
1. Saxons, Angles and Jutes
2. Alfred the Great
3. Celts
4. Romans
Comprehension:
Read the following passage and answer the questions given after it.
The Celts who lived in Britain before the Roman invasion of 43 AD could be said to have
created the first towns. Celts in southern England lived in hill forts, which were quite large
settlements. (Some probably had thousands of inhabitants). They were places of trade, where
people bought and sold goods and also places where craftsmen worked. The Romans called
them oppida.
However, the Romans created the first settlements that were undoubtedly towns. Roman
towns were usually laid out in a grid pattern. In the centre was the forum or market place. It
was lined with public buildings. Life in Roman towns was highly civilized with public baths and
temples.
From the 5th century Angles, Saxons and Jutes invaded England. At first, the invaders
avoided living in towns. However, as trade grew some towns grew up. London revived by the
7th century (although the Saxon town was, at first, outside the walls of the old Roman town).
Southampton was founded at the end of the 7th century. Hereford was founded in the 8th
century. Furthermore, Ipswich grew up in the 8th century and York revived.
However, towns were rare in Saxon England until the late 9th century. At that time, Alfred the
Great created a network of fortified settlements across his kingdom called ‘burhs’. In the event
of a Danish attack, men could gather in the local burh. However, burhs were more than forts.
They were also market towns. Some burhs were started from scratch but many were created
out of the ruins of old Roman towns. Places like Winchester rose, phoenix-like, from the
ashes of history.
The thing that would strike us most about medieval towns would be their small size.
Winchester, the capital of England, probably had about 8,000 people. At that time a 'large'
town, like Lincoln or Dublin had about 4,000 or 5,000 inhabitants and a 'medium sized' town,
like Colchester had about 2,500 people. Many towns were much smaller.
However, during the 12th and 13th centuries most towns grew much larger. Furthermore,
many new towns were created across Britain. Trade and commerce were increasing and
there was a need for new towns. Some were created from existing villages but some were
created from scratch. In those days you could create a town simply by starting a market.
There were few shops so if you wished to buy or sell anything you had to go to a market.
Once one was up and running, craftsmen and merchants would come to live in the area and a
town would grow.
SubQuestion No : 44
Q.44 When was Southampton founded?

Option:
1. in the 8th century
2. in the 7th century
3. in the 12th century
4. in the 6th century
Comprehension:
Read the following passage and answer the questions given after it.
The Celts who lived in Britain before the Roman invasion of 43 AD could be said to have
created the first towns. Celts in southern England lived in hill forts, which were quite large
settlements. (Some probably had thousands of inhabitants). They were places of trade, where
people bought and sold goods and also places where craftsmen worked. The Romans called
them oppida.
However, the Romans created the first settlements that were undoubtedly towns. Roman
towns were usually laid out in a grid pattern. In the centre was the forum or market place. It
was lined with public buildings. Life in Roman towns was highly civilized with public baths and
temples.
From the 5th century Angles, Saxons and Jutes invaded England. At first, the invaders
avoided living in towns. However, as trade grew some towns grew up. London revived by the
7th century (although the Saxon town was, at first, outside the walls of the old Roman town).
Southampton was founded at the end of the 7th century. Hereford was founded in the 8th
century. Furthermore, Ipswich grew up in the 8th century and York revived.
However, towns were rare in Saxon England until the late 9th century. At that time, Alfred the
Great created a network of fortified settlements across his kingdom called ‘burhs’. In the event
of a Danish attack, men could gather in the local burh. However, burhs were more than forts.
They were also market towns. Some burhs were started from scratch but many were created
out of the ruins of old Roman towns. Places like Winchester rose, phoenix-like, from the
ashes of history.
The thing that would strike us most about medieval towns would be their small size.
Winchester, the capital of England, probably had about 8,000 people. At that time a 'large'
town, like Lincoln or Dublin had about 4,000 or 5,000 inhabitants and a 'medium sized' town,
like Colchester had about 2,500 people. Many towns were much smaller.
However, during the 12th and 13th centuries most towns grew much larger. Furthermore,
many new towns were created across Britain. Trade and commerce were increasing and
there was a need for new towns. Some were created from existing villages but some were
created from scratch. In those days you could create a town simply by starting a market.
There were few shops so if you wished to buy or sell anything you had to go to a market.
Once one was up and running, craftsmen and merchants would come to live in the area and a
town would grow.
SubQuestion No : 45
Q.45 The passage mainly talks about:

Option:
1. the increase of trade in England
2. the development of markets in England
3. the early life in England
4. the history of towns in England
Comprehension:
Read the following passage and answer the questions given after it.
The giraffe is the tallest land mammal alive, its long legs and neck contributing to its
impressive stature. Males can be up to 18ft (5.5m tall), females a little less.
In the wild, these beautiful creatures stretch their necks beyond those of antelope, kudu and
even elephants to strip leaves from the untouched upper reaches of trees.
The French zoologist Jean-Baptiste Lamarck is usually credited as the first person to suggest
that long necks have evolved in giraffes because they allow them to get to the parts other
herbivores cannot reach.
As the giraffe lives "in places where the soil is nearly always arid and barren, it is obliged to
browse on the leaves of trees and to make constant efforts to reach them," he wrote in his
1809 book ‘Philosophie Zoologique’. "From this habit long maintained in all its race, it has
resulted that the animal's fore-legs have become longer than its hind legs, and that its neck is
lengthened."
The English naturalist Charles Darwin also thought the giraffe's extraordinary legs and neck
must have something to do with foraging. "The giraffe, by its lofty stature, much elongated
neck, fore-legs, head and tongue, has its whole frame beautifully adapted for browsing on the
higher branches of trees," he wrote in ‘On the Origin of Species’ in 1859.
In short, giraffes' long necks are the result of generation upon generation of repeated
stretching and inheritance.
During the dry season when feeding competition should be most intense giraffe generally feed
from low shrubs, not tall trees. What's more, giraffes feed most often and faster with their
necks bent.
Male giraffes often fight for access to females, a ritual referred to as "necking". The rivals
stand flank to flank, then start to whack each other with their heads. The top or back of the
well-armoured skull is used as a club to strike the neck, chest, ribs, or legs of the opponent
with a force capable of knocking a competitor off balance or unconscious.
The largest males usually win these battles and do most of the breeding, says zoologist Anne
Innis Dagg of the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada, who has been studying giraffes
since the 1950s. "The other giraffes don't get much breeding opportunity."
There is also evidence that females are more receptive to advances from larger males.
SubQuestion No : 46
Q.46 Match the words with their meanings.

a. forage 1. hit
b. stretch 2. search
c. whack 3. draw out

Option:
1. a-3, b-2, c-1
2. a-2, b-3, c-1
3. a-2, b-1, c-3
4. a-1, b-3, c-2
Comprehension:
Read the following passage and answer the questions given after it.
The giraffe is the tallest land mammal alive, its long legs and neck contributing to its
impressive stature. Males can be up to 18ft (5.5m tall), females a little less.
In the wild, these beautiful creatures stretch their necks beyond those of antelope, kudu and
even elephants to strip leaves from the untouched upper reaches of trees.
The French zoologist Jean-Baptiste Lamarck is usually credited as the first person to suggest
that long necks have evolved in giraffes because they allow them to get to the parts other
herbivores cannot reach.
As the giraffe lives "in places where the soil is nearly always arid and barren, it is obliged to
browse on the leaves of trees and to make constant efforts to reach them," he wrote in his
1809 book ‘Philosophie Zoologique’. "From this habit long maintained in all its race, it has
resulted that the animal's fore-legs have become longer than its hind legs, and that its neck is
lengthened."
The English naturalist Charles Darwin also thought the giraffe's extraordinary legs and neck
must have something to do with foraging. "The giraffe, by its lofty stature, much elongated
neck, fore-legs, head and tongue, has its whole frame beautifully adapted for browsing on the
higher branches of trees," he wrote in ‘On the Origin of Species’ in 1859.
In short, giraffes' long necks are the result of generation upon generation of repeated
stretching and inheritance.
During the dry season when feeding competition should be most intense giraffe generally feed
from low shrubs, not tall trees. What's more, giraffes feed most often and faster with their
necks bent.
Male giraffes often fight for access to females, a ritual referred to as "necking". The rivals
stand flank to flank, then start to whack each other with their heads. The top or back of the
well-armoured skull is used as a club to strike the neck, chest, ribs, or legs of the opponent
with a force capable of knocking a competitor off balance or unconscious.
The largest males usually win these battles and do most of the breeding, says zoologist Anne
Innis Dagg of the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada, who has been studying giraffes
since the 1950s. "The other giraffes don't get much breeding opportunity."
There is also evidence that females are more receptive to advances from larger males.
SubQuestion No : 47
Q.47 Giraffe’s feeding is faster when it feeds with its neck:

Option:
1. bent
2. elongated
3. straight
4. entangled
Comprehension:
Read the following passage and answer the questions given after it.
The giraffe is the tallest land mammal alive, its long legs and neck contributing to its
impressive stature. Males can be up to 18ft (5.5m tall), females a little less.
In the wild, these beautiful creatures stretch their necks beyond those of antelope, kudu and
even elephants to strip leaves from the untouched upper reaches of trees.
The French zoologist Jean-Baptiste Lamarck is usually credited as the first person to suggest
that long necks have evolved in giraffes because they allow them to get to the parts other
herbivores cannot reach.
As the giraffe lives "in places where the soil is nearly always arid and barren, it is obliged to
browse on the leaves of trees and to make constant efforts to reach them," he wrote in his
1809 book ‘Philosophie Zoologique’. "From this habit long maintained in all its race, it has
resulted that the animal's fore-legs have become longer than its hind legs, and that its neck is
lengthened."
The English naturalist Charles Darwin also thought the giraffe's extraordinary legs and neck
must have something to do with foraging. "The giraffe, by its lofty stature, much elongated
neck, fore-legs, head and tongue, has its whole frame beautifully adapted for browsing on the
higher branches of trees," he wrote in ‘On the Origin of Species’ in 1859.
In short, giraffes' long necks are the result of generation upon generation of repeated
stretching and inheritance.
During the dry season when feeding competition should be most intense giraffe generally feed
from low shrubs, not tall trees. What's more, giraffes feed most often and faster with their
necks bent.
Male giraffes often fight for access to females, a ritual referred to as "necking". The rivals
stand flank to flank, then start to whack each other with their heads. The top or back of the
well-armoured skull is used as a club to strike the neck, chest, ribs, or legs of the opponent
with a force capable of knocking a competitor off balance or unconscious.
The largest males usually win these battles and do most of the breeding, says zoologist Anne
Innis Dagg of the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada, who has been studying giraffes
since the 1950s. "The other giraffes don't get much breeding opportunity."
There is also evidence that females are more receptive to advances from larger males.
SubQuestion No : 48
Q.48 Which statement is NOT true according to the passage?

Option:
1. The largest male giraffe usually wins the battles and does most of the breeding.
2. Giraffes' long necks are the result of repeated stretching over the years.
3. The giraffe can eat leaves from the upper reaches of a tree where other animals cannot reach.
4. A giraffe’s hind-legs are longer than its fore-legs and help it to bend.
Comprehension:
Read the following passage and answer the questions given after it.
The giraffe is the tallest land mammal alive, its long legs and neck contributing to its
impressive stature. Males can be up to 18ft (5.5m tall), females a little less.
In the wild, these beautiful creatures stretch their necks beyond those of antelope, kudu and
even elephants to strip leaves from the untouched upper reaches of trees.
The French zoologist Jean-Baptiste Lamarck is usually credited as the first person to suggest
that long necks have evolved in giraffes because they allow them to get to the parts other
herbivores cannot reach.
As the giraffe lives "in places where the soil is nearly always arid and barren, it is obliged to
browse on the leaves of trees and to make constant efforts to reach them," he wrote in his
1809 book ‘Philosophie Zoologique’. "From this habit long maintained in all its race, it has
resulted that the animal's fore-legs have become longer than its hind legs, and that its neck is
lengthened."
The English naturalist Charles Darwin also thought the giraffe's extraordinary legs and neck
must have something to do with foraging. "The giraffe, by its lofty stature, much elongated
neck, fore-legs, head and tongue, has its whole frame beautifully adapted for browsing on the
higher branches of trees," he wrote in ‘On the Origin of Species’ in 1859.
In short, giraffes' long necks are the result of generation upon generation of repeated
stretching and inheritance.
During the dry season when feeding competition should be most intense giraffe generally feed
from low shrubs, not tall trees. What's more, giraffes feed most often and faster with their
necks bent.
Male giraffes often fight for access to females, a ritual referred to as "necking". The rivals
stand flank to flank, then start to whack each other with their heads. The top or back of the
well-armoured skull is used as a club to strike the neck, chest, ribs, or legs of the opponent
with a force capable of knocking a competitor off balance or unconscious.
The largest males usually win these battles and do most of the breeding, says zoologist Anne
Innis Dagg of the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada, who has been studying giraffes
since the 1950s. "The other giraffes don't get much breeding opportunity."
There is also evidence that females are more receptive to advances from larger males.
SubQuestion No : 49
Q.49 According to the passage, ‘necking’ is the:

Option:
1. repeated stretching of the neck
2. elongation of the giraffes’ neck
3. breeding by the largest males
4. fight to woo the females
Comprehension:
Read the following passage and answer the questions given after it.
The giraffe is the tallest land mammal alive, its long legs and neck contributing to its
impressive stature. Males can be up to 18ft (5.5m tall), females a little less.
In the wild, these beautiful creatures stretch their necks beyond those of antelope, kudu and
even elephants to strip leaves from the untouched upper reaches of trees.
The French zoologist Jean-Baptiste Lamarck is usually credited as the first person to suggest
that long necks have evolved in giraffes because they allow them to get to the parts other
herbivores cannot reach.
As the giraffe lives "in places where the soil is nearly always arid and barren, it is obliged to
browse on the leaves of trees and to make constant efforts to reach them," he wrote in his
1809 book ‘Philosophie Zoologique’. "From this habit long maintained in all its race, it has
resulted that the animal's fore-legs have become longer than its hind legs, and that its neck is
lengthened."
The English naturalist Charles Darwin also thought the giraffe's extraordinary legs and neck
must have something to do with foraging. "The giraffe, by its lofty stature, much elongated
neck, fore-legs, head and tongue, has its whole frame beautifully adapted for browsing on the
higher branches of trees," he wrote in ‘On the Origin of Species’ in 1859.
In short, giraffes' long necks are the result of generation upon generation of repeated
stretching and inheritance.
During the dry season when feeding competition should be most intense giraffe generally feed
from low shrubs, not tall trees. What's more, giraffes feed most often and faster with their
necks bent.
Male giraffes often fight for access to females, a ritual referred to as "necking". The rivals
stand flank to flank, then start to whack each other with their heads. The top or back of the
well-armoured skull is used as a club to strike the neck, chest, ribs, or legs of the opponent
with a force capable of knocking a competitor off balance or unconscious.
The largest males usually win these battles and do most of the breeding, says zoologist Anne
Innis Dagg of the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada, who has been studying giraffes
since the 1950s. "The other giraffes don't get much breeding opportunity."
There is also evidence that females are more receptive to advances from larger males.
SubQuestion No : 50
Q.50 How does a giraffe knock its opponent off balance or unconscious?

Option:
1. By pulling the legs of the opponent
2. By using its head as a club and hitting the opponent
3. By biting the opponent’s neck, chest and ribs
4. By entangling its neck in the opponent’s neck


Comprehension:
Read the following passage and answer the questions given after it.
The stark observation made in the Economic Survey of 2015-16 that “Indian agriculture, is in
a way, a victim of its own past success – especially the green revolution”, shows the dark
reality of the agriculture sector at present and the havoc that has been wreaked by the green
revolution.
The green revolution, which is often characterised by the introduction of high-yielding variety
of seeds and fertilisers, undoubtedly increased the productivity of land considerably. But the
growth in the productivity has been stagnant in recent years, resulting in a significant decline
in the income of farmers. There have also been negative environmental effects in the form of
depleting water table, emission of greenhouse gases, and the contamination of surface and
ground water. Needless to say, the agriculture sector is in a state of distress, which is severely
affecting peasants and marginal farmers, and urgent policy interventions are required to
protect their interests.
The government has responded to the problem by constituting a panel, which will recommend
ways to double the income of farmers by 2022. While this may be an overtly ambitious target,
if we want to boost stagnated agricultural growth a shift has to be made from food security of
the nation to income security of the farmers. However, there are many hurdles that have to be
crossed if we want to achieve this objective.
The first major barrier to overcome is declining productivity. Data from 2013 reveals that
India’s average yield of cereal per hectare is far less than that of many countries (including
several low income countries), but the difference is huge when compared to China. For
instance, our average yield per hectare is 39% below than that of China and for rice this figure
is 46%. Even Bangladesh, Vietnam and Indonesia fare better than India in case of rice yield.
Further, there is a huge inter-regional variation; the wheat and rice yield from Haryana and
Punjab is much higher than from the other states.
In order to cross the declining productivity barrier there is a need to herald a rainbow
revolution by making a shift from wheat-rice cycle to other cereals and pulses. Since wheat
and rice coupled with other crops are backed by minimum support prices (MSP) and input
subsidy (whether water, fertiliser or power) regime, there is a huge incentive for the farmers in
the irrigated region of Northwest India to grow these crops.
SubQuestion No : 51
Q.51 As per the passage, which country has the highest yield of rice per hectare?

Option:
1. Vietnam
2. Bangladesh
3. China
4. Indonesia
Comprehension:
Read the following passage and answer the questions given after it.
The stark observation made in the Economic Survey of 2015-16 that “Indian agriculture, is in
a way, a victim of its own past success – especially the green revolution”, shows the dark
reality of the agriculture sector at present and the havoc that has been wreaked by the green
revolution.
The green revolution, which is often characterised by the introduction of high-yielding variety
of seeds and fertilisers, undoubtedly increased the productivity of land considerably. But the
growth in the productivity has been stagnant in recent years, resulting in a significant decline
in the income of farmers. There have also been negative environmental effects in the form of
depleting water table, emission of greenhouse gases, and the contamination of surface and
ground water. Needless to say, the agriculture sector is in a state of distress, which is severely
affecting peasants and marginal farmers, and urgent policy interventions are required to
protect their interests.
The government has responded to the problem by constituting a panel, which will recommend
ways to double the income of farmers by 2022. While this may be an overtly ambitious target,
if we want to boost stagnated agricultural growth a shift has to be made from food security of
the nation to income security of the farmers. However, there are many hurdles that have to be
crossed if we want to achieve this objective.
The first major barrier to overcome is declining productivity. Data from 2013 reveals that
India’s average yield of cereal per hectare is far less than that of many countries (including
several low income countries), but the difference is huge when compared to China. For
instance, our average yield per hectare is 39% below than that of China and for rice this figure
is 46%. Even Bangladesh, Vietnam and Indonesia fare better than India in case of rice yield.
Further, there is a huge inter-regional variation; the wheat and rice yield from Haryana and
Punjab is much higher than from the other states.
In order to cross the declining productivity barrier there is a need to herald a rainbow
revolution by making a shift from wheat-rice cycle to other cereals and pulses. Since wheat
and rice coupled with other crops are backed by minimum support prices (MSP) and input
subsidy (whether water, fertiliser or power) regime, there is a huge incentive for the farmers in
the irrigated region of Northwest India to grow these crops.
SubQuestion No : 52
Q.52 Which statement is NOT true according to the passage?

Option:
1. High yielding seeds and fertilizers were a hallmark of green revolution.
2. The rice yield in India is below that of China by 39%.
3. The growth in productivity has stagnated today.
4. In Northwest India, farmers get subsidies on rice, wheat and other crops.
Comprehension:
Read the following passage and answer the questions given after it.
The stark observation made in the Economic Survey of 2015-16 that “Indian agriculture, is in
a way, a victim of its own past success – especially the green revolution”, shows the dark
reality of the agriculture sector at present and the havoc that has been wreaked by the green
revolution.
The green revolution, which is often characterised by the introduction of high-yielding variety
of seeds and fertilisers, undoubtedly increased the productivity of land considerably. But the
growth in the productivity has been stagnant in recent years, resulting in a significant decline
in the income of farmers. There have also been negative environmental effects in the form of
depleting water table, emission of greenhouse gases, and the contamination of surface and
ground water. Needless to say, the agriculture sector is in a state of distress, which is severely
affecting peasants and marginal farmers, and urgent policy interventions are required to
protect their interests.
The government has responded to the problem by constituting a panel, which will recommend
ways to double the income of farmers by 2022. While this may be an overtly ambitious target,
if we want to boost stagnated agricultural growth a shift has to be made from food security of
the nation to income security of the farmers. However, there are many hurdles that have to be
crossed if we want to achieve this objective.
The first major barrier to overcome is declining productivity. Data from 2013 reveals that
India’s average yield of cereal per hectare is far less than that of many countries (including
several low income countries), but the difference is huge when compared to China. For
instance, our average yield per hectare is 39% below than that of China and for rice this figure
is 46%. Even Bangladesh, Vietnam and Indonesia fare better than India in case of rice yield.
Further, there is a huge inter-regional variation; the wheat and rice yield from Haryana and
Punjab is much higher than from the other states.
In order to cross the declining productivity barrier there is a need to herald a rainbow
revolution by making a shift from wheat-rice cycle to other cereals and pulses. Since wheat
and rice coupled with other crops are backed by minimum support prices (MSP) and input
subsidy (whether water, fertiliser or power) regime, there is a huge incentive for the farmers in
the irrigated region of Northwest India to grow these crops.
SubQuestion No : 53
Q.53 What does the author suggest to enhance the income of the farmers?

Option:
1. Constitute a panel to suggest ways to double the income
2. Provide income security to the farmers
3. Give subsidies on water, fertilizers and power
4. Shift wheat-rice cycle to include other cereals and pulses
Comprehension:
Read the following passage and answer the questions given after it.
The stark observation made in the Economic Survey of 2015-16 that “Indian agriculture, is in
a way, a victim of its own past success – especially the green revolution”, shows the dark
reality of the agriculture sector at present and the havoc that has been wreaked by the green
revolution.
The green revolution, which is often characterised by the introduction of high-yielding variety
of seeds and fertilisers, undoubtedly increased the productivity of land considerably. But the
growth in the productivity has been stagnant in recent years, resulting in a significant decline
in the income of farmers. There have also been negative environmental effects in the form of
depleting water table, emission of greenhouse gases, and the contamination of surface and
ground water. Needless to say, the agriculture sector is in a state of distress, which is severely
affecting peasants and marginal farmers, and urgent policy interventions are required to
protect their interests.
The government has responded to the problem by constituting a panel, which will recommend
ways to double the income of farmers by 2022. While this may be an overtly ambitious target,
if we want to boost stagnated agricultural growth a shift has to be made from food security of
the nation to income security of the farmers. However, there are many hurdles that have to be
crossed if we want to achieve this objective.
The first major barrier to overcome is declining productivity. Data from 2013 reveals that
India’s average yield of cereal per hectare is far less than that of many countries (including
several low income countries), but the difference is huge when compared to China. For
instance, our average yield per hectare is 39% below than that of China and for rice this figure
is 46%. Even Bangladesh, Vietnam and Indonesia fare better than India in case of rice yield.
Further, there is a huge inter-regional variation; the wheat and rice yield from Haryana and
Punjab is much higher than from the other states.
In order to cross the declining productivity barrier there is a need to herald a rainbow
revolution by making a shift from wheat-rice cycle to other cereals and pulses. Since wheat
and rice coupled with other crops are backed by minimum support prices (MSP) and input
subsidy (whether water, fertiliser or power) regime, there is a huge incentive for the farmers in
the irrigated region of Northwest India to grow these crops.
SubQuestion No : 54
Q.54 The purpose of this passage is to:

Option:
1. suggest measures for improving the farmers’ lot
2. talk about the consequences of the green revolution
3. compare Indian agriculture with that of other countries
4. express the anguish of the farmers
Comprehension:
Read the following passage and answer the questions given after it.
The stark observation made in the Economic Survey of 2015-16 that “Indian agriculture, is in
a way, a victim of its own past success – especially the green revolution”, shows the dark
reality of the agriculture sector at present and the havoc that has been wreaked by the green
revolution.
The green revolution, which is often characterised by the introduction of high-yielding variety
of seeds and fertilisers, undoubtedly increased the productivity of land considerably. But the
growth in the productivity has been stagnant in recent years, resulting in a significant decline
in the income of farmers. There have also been negative environmental effects in the form of
depleting water table, emission of greenhouse gases, and the contamination of surface and
ground water. Needless to say, the agriculture sector is in a state of distress, which is severely
affecting peasants and marginal farmers, and urgent policy interventions are required to
protect their interests.
The government has responded to the problem by constituting a panel, which will recommend
ways to double the income of farmers by 2022. While this may be an overtly ambitious target,
if we want to boost stagnated agricultural growth a shift has to be made from food security of
the nation to income security of the farmers. However, there are many hurdles that have to be
crossed if we want to achieve this objective.
The first major barrier to overcome is declining productivity. Data from 2013 reveals that
India’s average yield of cereal per hectare is far less than that of many countries (including
several low income countries), but the difference is huge when compared to China. For
instance, our average yield per hectare is 39% below than that of China and for rice this figure
is 46%. Even Bangladesh, Vietnam and Indonesia fare better than India in case of rice yield.
Further, there is a huge inter-regional variation; the wheat and rice yield from Haryana and
Punjab is much higher than from the other states.
In order to cross the declining productivity barrier there is a need to herald a rainbow
revolution by making a shift from wheat-rice cycle to other cereals and pulses. Since wheat
and rice coupled with other crops are backed by minimum support prices (MSP) and input
subsidy (whether water, fertiliser or power) regime, there is a huge incentive for the farmers in
the irrigated region of Northwest India to grow these crops.
SubQuestion No : 55
Q.55 As per the passage, what is the main cause of decline in the income of farmers?

Option:
1. Emission of greenhouse gases
2. Decline in agricultural production
3. Depleting water table
4. Contamination of ground water
Q.56 Select the most appropriate word for the given group of words. 
A person who is absolutely necessary for someone or something

Option:
1. indelible
2. indispensable
3. ineffable
4. infallible
Q.57 Parts of the following sentence are given as options. Identify the segment that
contains a grammatical error. Bhanu finished to read such a thick book in just two days.

Option:
1. Bhanu finished
2. in just two day
3. such a thick book
4. to read
Q.58 Select the most appropriate option to substitute the underlined segment in the given
sentence. If there is no need to substitute it, select ‘No substitution required’. 
The hotels were heavy booked for the festival in Banaras.

Option:
1. are heavy booked
2. were heavily booking
3. were heavily booked
4. No substitution required
Q.59 Select the most appropriate meaning of the given idiom. 
Eat one’s words

Option:
1. forgive and forget
2. become less acceptable
3. retract what one has said
4. oppose sternly
Q.60 Select the most appropriate synonym of the given word. 
ESTIMATE

Option:
1. assess
2. solve
3. discover
4. believe
Q.61 Select the most appropriate option to substitute the underlined segment in the given
sentence. If there is no need to substitute it, select ‘No substitution required’. 

A team of biologists have been discovered four new species of horned frogs in the
North Eastern region of India.

Option:
1. has been discovered
2. has been discovering
3. has discovered
4. No substitution required
Q.62 Select the most appropriate option to fill in the blank. 
 _______ he became a minister, he didn’t allow any of his relatives to live with him.

Option:
1. As long as
2. In case
3. As soon as
4. In order that
Q.63 Select the most appropriate option to substitute the underlined segment in the given
sentence. If there is no need to substitute it, select ‘No substitution required’. 
Hardly had we stepped out of the building then we get drenched.

Option:
1. that we are getting
2. No substitution required
3. than we got
4. when we got
Q.64 Select the most appropriate direct form of the given sentence. 
The salesman said that he had verified all the bills while the goods were being packed.

Option:
1. The salesman said, “He had verified all the bills while the goods was being packed.”
2. The salesman said, “I am verifying all the bills while the goods are being packed.”
3. The salesman said, “I have verified all the bills while the goods are packed.”
4. The salesman said, “I verified all the bills while the goods were being packed.”
Q.65 Select the most appropriate direct form of the given sentence.
My brother told me that I could see any film I wanted on TV.

Option:
1. My brother said to me, “You could see any film you wanted on TV.”
2. My brother said to me, “I could see any film I wanted on TV.”
3. My brother said to me, “I can see any film I want on TV.”
4. My brother said to me, “You can see any film you want on TV.”
Q.66 Select the most appropriate indirect form of the given sentence.  
Amit said to me, “Your parents are waiting for you.”

Option:
1. Amit told me that his parents were waiting for me.
2. Amit told me that your parents are waiting for you.
3. Amit told me that my parents were waiting for me.
4. Amit asked me if my parents were waiting for me.
Q.67 Select the most appropriate option to fill in the blanks.
______ cart loaded with mangoes turned upside down on ______ main road.

Option:
1. The, the
2. The, a
3. A, the
4. A, a
Q.68 Parts of the following sentence are given as options. Identify the segment that
contains a grammatical error. I shall buy this book if you like it or not.

Option:
1. this book
2. or not
3. I shall buy
4. if you like it
Q.69 Select the most appropriate option to substitute the underlined segment in the given
sentence. If there is no need to substitute it, select ‘No substitution required’. 
I couldn’t sleep in case of being very tired.

Option:
1. No substitution required
2. even though
3. in spite of
4. in order of
Q.70 Select the most appropriate indirect form of the given sentence. 
Esha said, “Avika is not going to school today as she has fever.”

Option:
1. Esha said that Avika had not gone to school that day as she was having fever.
2. Esha said that Avika was not going to school today as she has fever.
3. Esha said that Avika was not going to school that day as she had fever.
4. Esha said that Avika is not going to school today as she has fever.
Q.71 Parts of the following sentence are given as options. Identify the segment that
contains a grammatical error.  My grandmother is quite concerned to my progress at school
.
Option:
1. My grandmother
2. to my progress
3. is quite concerned
4. at school 
Q.72 Given below are four jumbled sentences. Select the option that gives their correct
order.  

A. The mountaineers set up a camp at a height of 15000 feet.
B. Then they started climbing.
C. They struggled up a steep slope and stopped at a height of 20000 feet.
D. There they stayed for a week to get accustomed to the climate. 

Option:
1. ABDC
2. CADB
3. ADBC
4. CDAB
Q.73 Select the most appropriate indirect form of the given sentence. 
Rani said to me, “A monkey bit me in the park.”

Option:
1. Rani asked me if a monkey bit me in the park.
2. Rani told me that a monkey bit me in the park.
3. Rani told me that a monkey had bitten her in the park.
4. Rani told me that a monkey has bitten her in the park.
Q.74 Select the correct passive form of the given sentence. 
Her failure to get admission in the Science stream surprised us.

Option:
1. We are surprised about her failure to get admission in the Science stream.
2. We were surprised about her failure to get admission in the Science stream.
3. We had been surprised about her failure to get admission in the Science stream.
4. We have been surprised about her failure to get admission in the Science stream.
Q.75 Select the most appropriate meaning of the given idiom. 
Rose-coloured glasses

Option:
1. a positive outlook on life
2. a difficult situation
3. an outdated attitude
4. a belief not based on facts
Q.76 Select the most appropriate word for the given group of words. 
A slowly moving mass or river of ice

Option:
1. glacier
2. typhoon
3. avalanche
4. blizzard
Q.77 Select the most appropriate meaning of the given idiom. 
On the spur of the moment

Option:
1. deciding after a lot of thinking
2. acting impulsively without thinking
3. waiting nervously for something
4. being extremely careful
Q.78 Select the correct passive form of the given sentence. 
He was eating a large pizza.

Option:
1. A large pizza was eating him.
2. A large pizza has been eaten by him.
3. A large pizza was being eaten by him.
4. A large pizza was eaten by him.
Q.79 Given below are four jumbled sentences. Select the option that gives their correct
order.  

A. The young woman was looking deathly pale and very frightened.
B. I felt sorry for her as I looked into her eyes.
C. Without saying a word she gave me a ring.
D. Then she ran out of the shop as if the place was on fire.

Option: 
1. CADB
2. ABCD
3. CDAB
4. ADBC
Q.80 Select the most appropriate word for the given group of words.  
A person who eats the flesh of other human beings.

Option:
1. cannibal
2. savage
3. tribal
4. aborigine
Q.81 Given below are four jumbled sentences. Select the option that gives their correct
order.
 
A. It produced a squeaky little note that startled a line parrot out of the mango tree.
B. Kamala took the flute and blew on it.
C. Romi laughed.
D. While he was laughing, Kamala turned and ran through the fields. 

Option:
1. CBDA
2. BDCA
3. DCAB
4. BACD
Q.82 Given below are four jumbled sentences. Select the option that gives their correct
order.  

A. Whistling and prancing he moved with a carefree gait.
B. His bugle, bow and arrow hung loosely on his shoulders.
C. On a fine morning Robin Hood woke early and headed in the direction of Nottingham.
D. When he was passing a shady path, he ran into a tinker coming along, singing merrily.

Option:
1. CABD
2. CDBA
3. ABDC
4. ADBC
Q.83 Select the most appropriate direct form of the given sentence. 
I asked Rahul why he was back so soon.

Option:
1. I asked to Rahul, “Why was he back so soon?”
2. I said to Rahul, “Why he was back so soon?”
3. I said to Rahul, “Why are you back so soon?”
4. I said to Rahul, “Why you are back so soon?”
Q.84 Select the correct passive form of the given sentence. 
Why did the editor give such a rude comment?

Option:
1. Why had such a rude comment been given by the editor?
2. Why is such a rude comment being given by the editor?
3. Why was such an editor given by the rude comment?
4. Why was such a rude comment given by the editor?
Q.85 Select the most appropriate indirect form of the given sentence. 
Mother said to me, “Will you help me in cleaning the house?”

Option:
1. Mother asked me if you would help her in cleaning the house.
2. Mother asked me will you help me in cleaning the house.
3. Mother told me that I should help her in cleaning the house.
4. Mother asked me if I would help her in cleaning the house.
Q.86 Select the most appropriate indirect form of the given sentence. 
The professor said to Piyush, “Will you clean the data and get back to me tomorrow?”

Option:
1. The professor told Piyush clean the data and get back to him the next day.
2. The professor asked Piyush if he would clean the data and get back to him the next day.
3. The professor asked Piyush will you clean the data and get back to me tomorrow.
4. The professor ordered Piyush that he should clean the data and get back to him the next day.
Q.87 Select the most appropriate word for the given group of words. 
Medical doctors who specialise in diagnosing diseases using X-rays, CT scans and
ultrasound

Option:
1. dermatologist
2. cardiologist
3. radiologist
4. pathologist
Q.88 Select the correct indirect form of the given sentence. 
The driver said to the passerby, “Do you know the way to the market?”

Option:
1. The driver asked the passerby did he know the way to the market.
2. The driver asked the passerby if he knows the way to the market.
3. The driver asked the passerby if he knew the way to the market.
4. The driver asked the passerby whether you know the way to the market.
Q.89 Select the most appropriate synonym of the given word. 
RELUCTANT

Option:
1. unwilling
2. pleased
3. afraid
4. steady
Q.90 Select the correct active form of the given sentence. 
He was given another chance by his employer.

Option:
1. His employer is giving him another chance.
2. His employer gave him another chance.
3. His employer has given him another chance.
4. He gave his employer another chance.
Q.91 Given below are four jumbled sentences. Select the option that gives their correct
order.  

A. Far below he saw green meadows and in their midst a village.
B. He sat down and rested in the shadow of a rock.
C. Nunez was in a pass between the mountains.
D. He slowly climbed down the precipices and about midday came to the plain, stiff and tired out.

Option: 
1. ADBC
2. CADB
3. CDAB
4. ABDC
Q.92 Select the correct active form of the given sentence. 
The man eating tiger will be captured tomorrow by the forest officers.

Option:
1. The forest officers will have captured the man eating tiger tomorrow.
2. The forest officers will capture the man eating tiger tomorrow.
3. The forest officers will be capturing the man eating tiger tomorrow.
4. The man eating tiger will capture the forest officers tomorrow.
Q.93 Select the most appropriate indirect form of the given sentence. 
Taru said, “Kavya is going to her grandmother’s house today for the weekend.”

Option:
1. Taru said that Kavya is going to her grandmother’s house today for the weekend.
2. Taru said that Kavya has gone to her grandmother’s house that day for the weekend.
3. Taru said that Kavya was going to her grandmother’s house today for the weekend.
4. Taru said that Kavya was going to her grandmother’s house that day for the weekend.
Q.94 Select the most appropriate indirect form of the given sentence. 
The teacher said to the parents, “Young children are very restless.”

Option:
1. The teacher said the parents that young children are very restless.
2. The teacher told the parents that young children had been very restless.
3. The teacher told the parents that young children were very restless.
4. The teacher asked the parents if young children are very restless.
Q.95 Select the most appropriate indirect form of the given sentence. 
“Press button A to start the machine,” said the instructor to the trainees.

Option:
1. The instructor said to the trainees that you should press button A to start the machine.
2. The instructor told the trainees to press button A to start the machine.
3. The instructor requested the trainees press button A to start the machine.
4. The instructor told the trainees that pressing button A would start the machine.
Q.96 Select the most appropriate option to substitute the underlined segment in the given
sentence. If there is no need to substitute it, select ‘No substitution required’. 

The Ghats in Benaras were very crowded but we were able to watch the Ganga aarti clearly.

Option:
1. No substitution required
2. but we was
3. but we are
4. so we were
Q.97 Select the most appropriate option to substitute the underlined segment in the given
sentence. If there is no need to substitute it, select ‘No substitution required’. 

He couldn’t believe it at first,so the most he thought about it, the more he decided it must be true.
1. but a most
2. but the more
3. although the more
4. No substitution required
Q.98 Given below are four jumbled sentences. Select the option that gives their correct order.  
A. The guard escorted him to the front office.
B. There the warden handed Jimmy his pardon, which had been signed by the Governor that morning.
C. There Jimmy Valentine was carefully stitching the shoe uppers.
D. A guard came to the prison shoe shop. 

Option:
1. BACD
2. DCAB
3. CBDA
4. BDCA
Q.99 Select the most appropriate meaning of the given idiom. 
One track mind

Option:
1. thinking of another point of view
2. using a well-known path
3. always thinking of only one thing
4. waiting anxiously for something
Q.100 Given below are four jumbled sentences. Select the option that gives their correct order.  
A. There he tasted the first sweet joy of liberty in the shape of a broiled chicken and a bottle of white wine.
B. Jimmy headed straight for a restaurant.
C. From there he proceeded leisurely to the station and boarded his train.
D. Three hours set him down at a little town near the state line.

Option:
1. CBDA
2. BDCA
3. BACD
4. DCAB
Q.101 Given below are four jumbled sentences. Select the option that gives their correct order.
A. Mr. Adams beamingly explained its working to Mr. Spencer.
B. It fastened with three solid steel bolts thrown simultaneously with a single handle and had a time lock.
C. He, however, showed a courteous but not too intelligent interest.
D. The vault was a small one, but it had a new patented door.

 
Option:
1. DCBA
2. CDBA
3. CBAD
4. DBAC
Q.102 Select the most appropriate option to substitute the underlined segment in the given
sentence. If there is no need to substitute it, select ‘No substitution required’. 
This appears to be the handiwork of someone who to belong to a criminal gang.

Option:
1. No substitution required
2. who belongs
3. who is belonging
4. which belongs
Q.103 Parts of the following sentence are given as options. Identify the segment that
contains a grammatical error.  
No sooner had Kavya started her online class that the web connection was lost.

Option:
1. was lost
2. that the web connection
3. No sooner had Kavya
4. started her online class
Q.104 Select the most appropriate direct form of the given sentence. 
Madhuri told me that I could stay in her flat whenever I was in Kolkata.

Option:
1. Madhuri said to me, “I could stay in her flat whenever I was in Kolkata.”
2. Madhuri said to me, “You could stay in her flat whenever she was in Kolkata.”
3. Madhuri said to me, “I can stay in my flat whenever I am in Kolkata.”
4. Madhuri said to me, “You can stay in my flat whenever you are in Kolkata.”
Q.105 Parts of the following sentence are given as options. Identify the segment that
contains a grammatical error.  He was not able to give many time to his research.

Option:
1. He was not able
2. many time
3. to give
4. to his research
Q.106 Select the correct passive form of the given sentence. 
We expect good news about the corona vaccine.

Option:
1. Good news has been expected by us about the corona vaccine.
2. Good news expected us about the corona vaccine.
3. Good news is expected by us about the corona vaccine.
4. Good news was expected by us about the corona vaccine.
Q.107 Parts of the following sentence are given as options. Identify the segment that
contains a grammatical error. 

Craze for a thing that are not easily available in our country is a common
phenomenon.

Option:

1. Craze for a
2. thing that are not easily
3. is a common phenomenon
4. available in our country
Q.108 Given below are four jumbled sentences. Select the option that gives their correct order.  
A. The prehistoric ring of standing stones at this site is carefully aligned to point to the sunset.
B. To get a view of the sun, Stonehenge in England is considered as one of the most iconic sites.
C. As the sun rises and sets on this day in the northern hemisphere, it is the year ’s shortest day.
D. Winter solstice on December 21st marks the beginning of longer daylight hours.

Option:
1. DABC
2. BDAC
3. DCBA
4. BCDA
Q.109 Select the most appropriate word for the given group of words. 
The organic component of soil, formed by the decomposition of leaves and other plant
material

Option:
1. clay
2. alluvium
3. humus
4. silt
Q.110 Select the most appropriate synonym of the given word. 
MOTIVE

Option:
1. reason
2. utility
3. benefit
4. chance
Q.111 Parts of the following sentence are given as options. Identify the segment that
contains a grammatical error. Before take this medicine you should consult a doctor.

Option:
1. Before take
2. a doctor
3. this medicine
4. you should consult
Q.112 Select the most appropriate word for the given group of words.  
A ruler with complete power over a country

Option:
1. traitor
2. democrat
3. aristocrat
4. dictator
Q.113 Select the correct indirect form of the given sentence. 
She said, “Is anyone there in the house?”

Option:
1. She asked if anyone was there in the house.
2. She enquired if someone is there in the house.
3. She told there is someone in the house.
4. She asked there is anyone in the house.
Q.114 Select the correct passive form of the given sentence. 
The masons are building the house.

Option:
1. The house has been built by the masons.
2. The house is being built by the masons.
3. The house was being built by the masons.
4. The house is building the masons.
Q.115 Select the correct passive form of the given sentence. 
Animals cannot make tools.

Option:
1. Animals cannot be made by tools.
2. Tools cannot be made by animals.
3. Tools are not to be made by animals.
4. Tools could not be made by animals.
Q.116 Select the correct active form of the given sentence. 
The terrorist was arrested by Mumbai Police.

Option:
1. Mumbai Police has arrested the terrorist.
2. Mumbai Police arrested the terrorist.
3. Mumbai Police is arresting the terrorist.
4. The terrorist arrested Mumbai Police.
Q.117 Parts of the following sentence are given as options. Identify the segment that
contains a grammatical error. 
When there were a strong wind, the pine trees made sad, eerie sounds.

Option:
1. the pine trees made
2. a strong wind
3. sad, eerie sounds
4. When there were
Q.118 Select the most appropriate option to substitute the underlined segment in the given
sentence. If there is no need to substitute it, select ‘No substitution required’. 
While Avika was watering the plants, they start raining

 .
Option:
1. it started raining
2. No substitution required
3. they start raining
4. it start raining
Q.119 Select the most appropriate option to substitute the underlined segment in the given
sentence. If there is no need to substitute it, select ‘No substitution required’. 
She itself are responsible for this situation of hers.

Option:
1. No substitution required
2. herself are
3. oneself is
4. herself is
Q.120 Select the most appropriate antonym of the given word. 
DEVOUT

Option:
1. passive
2. proficient
3. profound
4. pure
Q.121 Select the most appropriate option to substitute the underlined segment in the given
sentence. If there is no need to substitute it, select ‘No substitution required’. 
Four people were injured after a car suddenly came for a halt in outer Delhi.

Option:
1. came to a halt
2. came for the halt
3. come to a halt
4. No substitution required
Q.122 Given below are four jumbled sentences. Select the option that gives their correct
order.  
A. Beyond the iron gate were the playing fields and the school building.
B. Everything had changed about the school.
C. After about a ten-minute drive we reached the local school.
D. We got down from the car and stood in front of the gate. 

Option:
1. BDCA
2. DCBA
3. CDAB
4. CBAD
Q.123 Select the correctly spelt word.
Option:
1. perallel
2. parellel
3. parrallel
4. parallel
Q.124 Select the correct passive form of the given sentence. 
Our advocate is arguing the case very effectively.

Option:
1. The case has been argued very effectively by our advocate.
2. The case is arguing very effectively by our advocate.
3. The advocate is being argued very effectively by our case.
4. The case is being argued very effectively by our advocate.
Q.125 Select the correct active form of the given sentence. 
Let this email be sent immediately.

Option:
1. Send this email immediately.
2. Ask him to send this email immediately.
3. We can send this email immediately.
4. You could send this email immediately.
Q.126 Select the most appropriate antonym of the given word. 
PERSEVERANCE

Option:
1. determination
2. persistence
3. instability
4. resolution
Q.127 Select the most appropriate option to substitute the underlined segment in the given
sentence. If there is no need to substitute it, select ‘No substitution required’. 
It was him who encouraged I when I was feeling low.

Option:
1. No substitution required
2. he who encouraged me
3. he who encouraged I
4. him who encourages me
Q.128 Select the most appropriate meaning of the given idiom. 
On the double

Option:
1. on the verge of collapse
2. at a fast pace
3. out of order
4. between two undesirable things
Q.129 Select the correct active form of the given sentence.
The light was switched off by her before sleeping.

Option:
1. She is switching off the light before sleeping.
2. She switches off the light before sleeping.
3. She had switched off the light before sleeping.
4. She switched off the light before sleeping.
Q.130 Parts of the following sentence are given as options. Identify the segment that
contains a grammatical error. 
He gave such a long speech but everybody felt bored.

Option:
1. a long speech
2. but everybody
3. He gave such
4. felt bored
Q.131 Select the most appropriate antonym of the given word. 
MANIFEST

Option:
1. disguise
2. declare
3. distinguish
4. display
Q.132 Parts of the following sentence are given as options. Identify the segment that
contains a grammatical error. 
A tallest man that I have ever seen works in our coal mine.

Option:
1. ever seen
2. A tallest man
3. works in our coal mine
4. that I have
Q.133 Select the most appropriate meaning of the given idiom. 
Over one’s head

Option:
1. something totally unexpected
2. being at a disadvantage
3. unable to function as before
4. beyond one’s capability to understand something
Q.134 Select the most appropriate indirect form of the given sentence. 
The thief said to the judge, “Pardon me.”

Option:
1. The thief begged the judge to pardon him.
2. The thief requested the judge for pardon me.
3. The thief said to the judge to pardon.
4. The thief urged to pardon to the judge.
Q.135 Given below are four jumbled sentences. Select the option that gives their correct order.  
A. Day in and day out he pondered to find out a foolproof plan to capture Robin Hood.
B. The Sheriff did not want to give up the idea of capturing Robin Hood.
C. He shut himself in his chamber devising one plan after another.
D. He did not discuss his plans with anyone because he trusted nobody.

Option:
1. CBDA
2. DCAB
3. BACD
4. BDCA
Q.136 Select the correct active form of the given sentence.
The ticket will be sent to you by the airlines on e-mail.

Option:
1. The airlines had sent you the ticket by e-mail.
2. The airlines will have sent you the ticket by e-mail.
3. The airlines will send you the ticket by e-mail.
4. The airlines will be sending you the ticket by e-mail.
Q.137 Select the most appropriate option to fill in the blank. 
We ________Rohit for the last two months.

Option:
1. are not seeing
2. do not see
3. haven’t seen
4. did not see
Q.138 Select the most appropriate option to substitute the underlined segment in the given
sentence. If there is no need to substitute it, select ‘No substitution required’. 
She was too startled at first saying something , but finally she blurted out the truth.

Option:
1. say something
2. No substitution required
3. saying anything
4. to say anything
Q.139 Select the correct passive form of the given sentence. 
Somebody has already tipped the custom authorities about the drugs.

Option:
1. Custom authorities have already been tipped by the drugs.
2. Custom authorities have already been tipped about the drugs.
3. Custom authorities have already tipped someone about the drugs.
4. Custom authorities were already tipped about the drugs.
Q.140 Select the most appropriate word for the given group of words. 
A set of rooms forming one residence in a building

Option:
1. suite
2. villa
3. apartment
4. bungalow
Q.141 Select the most appropriate option to fill in the blank. 
We could see ______wild elephants bathing in the river.

Option:
1. any
2. some
3. none
4. lot
Q.142 Select the correctly spelt word.
Option:
1. battalion
2. batallion
3. batalion
4. battallion
Q.143 Parts of the following sentence are given as options. Identify the segment that
contains a grammatical error. 
Each one of the children in a nursery class require individual attention.

Option:
1. in a nursery class
2. Each one
3. of the children
4. require individual attention
Q.144 Select the most appropriate indirect form of the given sentence. 
I said to you, “ He should be trusted.”

Option:
1. I asked you if he should be trusted.
2. I told you that he should be trusted.
3. I told you that you should be trusted.
4. I told you that I should be trusted.
Q.145 Given below are four jumbled sentences. Select the option that gives their correct order. 
A. On the other hand, the Saracen chief looked slighter and shorter, but he was also strong.
B. The Briton was a huge powerful man with thick brown hair.
C. They went side by side to the well, where they ate their simple meal and rested.
D. They were a great contrast to each other.

Option:
1. CDAB
2. DCAB
3. DABC
4. BADC
Q.146 Given below are four jumbled sentences. Select the option that gives their correct order.  
A. Some people love to watch birds or fish, but I love to watch how men and women behave.
B. I love to watch people.
C. I have the habit of observing everything they do – the way they walk, talk, pray, what they eat, read or wear.
D. Nothing ever escapes my sharp eye.

Option:
1. BACD
2. DCAB
3. CBDA
4. BDCA
Q.147 Select the most appropriate option to substitute the underlined segment in the given
sentence. If there is no need to substitute it, select ‘No substitution required’. 
On winter evenings, a haze of smog hang in Delhi.

Option:
1. hangs over
2. is hanging over
3. hangs up
4. No substitution required
Q.148 Select the word which means the same as the group of words given. 
The date on which an event took place in a previous year

Option:
1. anniversary
2. decade
3. century
4. millennium
Q.149 Select the correct passive form of the given sentence. 
Who has broken the chair?

Option:
1. By whom was the chair been broken?
2. By whom is the chair been broken?
3. By whom has the chair been broken?
4. By whom had the chair been broken?
Q.150 Parts of the following sentence are given as options. Identify the segment that
contains a grammatical error. 
A large number of worker have started walking home.

Option:
1. walking home
2. have started
3. A large number
4. of worker
Q.151 Select the most appropriate option to substitute the underlined segment in the given
sentence. If there is no need to substitute it, select ‘No substitution required’. 
There were ten children in the class, six of which was crying.

Option:
1. whose are
2. who was
3. No substitution required
4. whom were
Q.152 Select the correct active form of the given sentence. 
Success cannot be achieved without hard work and sincerity.

Option:
1. Hard work and sincerity one cannot achieve without success.
2. One cannot achieve hard work and sincerity without success.
3. No one could achieve success without hard work and sincerity.
4. One cannot achieve success without hard work and sincerity.
Q.153 Parts of the following sentence are given as options. Identify the segment that
contains a grammatical error.
In this lock-down period every worker in the factory has started bring their own lunch.

Option:
1. has started bring
2. In this lock-down period
3. their own lunch
4. every worker in the factory
Q.154 Select the most appropriate indirect form of the given sentence. 
Our Principal says, “Rules are to be followed at any cost.”

Option:
1. Our Principal advised that rules need to be followed at any cost.
2. Our Principal says that rules are to be followed at any cost.
3. Our Principal told that rules are to be followed at any cost.
4. Our Principal said that rules had to be followed at any cost.
Q.155 Select the most appropriate indirect form of the given sentence.  
I said to Promod, “How did you break your leg?”

Option:
1. I asked Promod how did you break your leg.
2. I asked Promod how he had broken his leg.
3. I asked Promod how he had broken your leg.
4. I asked Promod how you broke your leg.
Q.156 Select the most appropriate option to substitute the underlined segment in the given
sentence. If there is no need to substitute it, select ‘No substitution required’. 
You need to take some guidance in Chemistry.

Option:
1. No substitution required
2. needs to take
3. need to taking
4. need take
Q.157 Given below are four jumbled sentences. Select the option that gives their correct order. 
A. It was a wonderful, almost awful sight – in place of the hayfield was a loch with waves on it.
B. At seven next morning I awoke and rushed to the window.
C. As I went to sleep I reflected that the rain must be filling the dam. 
D. That afternoon rain fell in torrents, and continued all evening and night.

Option:
1. CBAD
2. DBAC
3. CDBA
4. DCBA
Q.158 Select the most appropriate option to substitute the underlined segment in the given
sentence. If there is no need to substitute it, select ‘No substitution required’. 
Monika has learn French for a long time.

Option:
1. has learning
2. has been learnt
3. has been learning
4. No substitution required
Q.159 Given below are four jumbled sentences. Select the option that gives their correct order. 
A. Kunming, the Spring City, is the largest city in theYunnan province of China.
B. It is the political, economic, communication and cultural centre of Yunnan.
C. Kunming has pleasant weather and picturesque views.
D. Owing to the standard of life and favourable climate, the city has been ranked
among the best cities to live in China.

Option:
1. ABCD
2. CADB
3. CBDA
4. ABDC
Q.160 Given below are four jumbled sentences. Select the option that gives their correct order. 
A. It is impossible to reach the space as there is no passage that leads to it.
B. The void seems to have no meaning at all and was perhaps just left there for construction reasons.
C. It is about the size of the Grand Gallery which is a known passageway that leads to the King’s Chamber.
D. The newly found chamber in the Egyptian pyramid is 30 metres long.

Option:
1. CADB
2. DCAB
3. DCBA
4. BDCA
Q.161 Select the correct active form of the given sentence. 
All his faults were forgiven by her.

Option:
1. She forgave all his faults.
2. She has forgiven all his faults.
3. She will forgive all his faults.
4. She is forgiving all his faults.
Q.162 Parts of the following sentence are given as options. Identify the segment that
contains a grammatical error. 
She has been working with me on this project from two years.

Option:
1. with me
2. on this project
3. She has been working
4. from two years
Q.163 Select the most appropriate direct form of the given sentence. 
She exclaimed that I looked very beautiful in that dress.

Option:
1. She said, “How beautiful you look in this dress!”
2. She said, “How beautiful I look in this dress!”
3. She said, “How beautiful she looks in this dress!”
4. She said, “How beautiful I looked in that dress!”
Q.164 Select the most appropriate direct form of the given sentence. 
Anurag says that he would like to be an electronics engineer when he grows up.

Option:
1. Anurag says, “He likes to be an electronics engineer when he grows up.”
2. Anurag said, “I will like to be an electronics engineer when I grow up.”
3. Anurag says, “I like to be an electronics engineer when I grow up.”
4. Anurag says, “I would like to be an electronics engineer when I grow up.”
Q.165 Select the most appropriate direct form of the given sentence. 
The policeman told the inspector that he had arrested a man for breaking the lockdown rules.

Option:
1. The policeman said to the inspector, “He arrests a man for breaking the lock-down rules.”
2. The policeman said to the Inspector, “He would arrest a man for breaking the lockdown rules.”
3. The policeman said to the inspector, “I am arresting a man for breaking the lock-down rules.”
4. The policeman said to the inspector, “I have arrested a man for breaking the lockdown rules.”
Q.166 Select the most appropriate option to substitute the underlined segment in the given
sentence. If there is no need to substitute it, select ‘No substitution required’. 
If somebody attacks you, you needs be able to defend yourself.

Option:
1. No substitution required
2. need to be able
3. need being able
4. need be able
Q.167 Select the most appropriate option to substitute the underlined segment in the given
sentence. If there is no need to substitute it, select ‘No substitution required’. 
The doctor bade me taking the medicine immediately after breakfast.

Option:
1. bid me to taking
2. bade me to take
3. bade me take
4. No substitution required
Q.168 Given below are four jumbled sentences. Select the option that gives their correct order.  
A. They silently ate and having finished they sat down to sing sentimental songs.
B. On the way they bought a large loaf of bread, some cheese and a goatskin full of beer.
C. When Little John was halfway through his song, Robin stopped him.
D. They travelled for a long time towards Sherwood.

Option:
1. DBAC
2. DCBA
3. CBAD
4. CDBA
Q.169 Select the most appropriate option to substitute the underlined segment in the given
sentence. If there is no need to substitute it, select ‘No substitution required’. 
The song was so moving as all eyes became wet.

Option:
1. then
2. when
3. that
4. No substitution required
Q.170 Select the correct active form of the given sentence. 
The audience was surprised by the ending of the play.

Option:
1. The ending of the play was surprising for the audience.
2. The ending of the play surprised the audience.
3. The ending of the play has surprised the audience.
4. The audience surprised the ending of the play.
Q.171 Select the most appropriate meaning of the given idiom. 
A fair weather friend

Option:
1. an unreliable friend
2. a dependable friend
3. a friend turned into an enemy
4. a jealous friend
Q.172 Select the correctly spelt word.
Option:
1. contamporary
2. contemporary
3. contemperary
4. contemporery
Q.173 Select the most appropriate meaning of the given idiom. 
Breath of fresh air

Option:
1. a peaceful and relaxing place
2. someone with a pleasant voice
3. a high-priced and expensive thing
4. someone or something new and refreshing
Q.174 Parts of the following sentence are given as options. Identify the segment that
contains a grammatical error.
 The reason for visiting Meerut was because my mother needed to be looked after.

Option:
1. to be looked after
2. The reason for visiting
3. my mother needed
4. was because
Q.175 Select the most appropriate direct form of the given sentence. 
Garima told her friends that she couldn’t go with them to the movie that night as she
was very busy.

Option:
1. Garima said to her friends, “She couldn’t go with them to the movie that night as she was very busy.”
2. Garima said to her friends, “I can’t go with you to the movie tonight as I am very busy.”
3. Garima said to her friends, “I can’t go with them to the movie that night as I was very busy.”
4. Garima said to her friends, “I couldn’t go with you to the movie tonight as I was very busy.”
Q.176 Given below are four jumbled sentences. Select the option that gives their correct order.  
A. We were driving along National Highway 40.
B. If we drove ten kilometres along the road that branched off to the right, we would reach Brahmapur.
C. Aditya and I were returning from the site of our new factory.
D. We had reached a point where the road bifurcated.

Option:
1. CBAD
2. DCBA
3. CADB
4. BACD
Q.177 Select the correct active form of the given sentence. 
They were refused entry in Delhi by the police.

Option:
1. The police refused them entry in Delhi.
2. The police had refused them entry in Delhi.
3. The police have refused them entry in Delhi.
4. The police can refuse them entry in Delhi.
Q.178 Given below are four jumbled sentences. Select the option that gives their correct order.  
A. Since then cows, pigs, dogs and other mammals have been cloned.
B. They were created with the identical technique used to clone Dolly, the sheep, back in 1996.
C. Two monkeys have been cloned in a Chinese laboratory.
D. Zhong Zhong and Hua Hua were born a few weeks ago at a Chinese lab.

Option:
1. DCBA
2. CDBA
3. DBAC
4. CBAD
Q.179 Select the most appropriate direct form of the given sentence. 
Taru said that she could not leave the children alone.

Option:
1. Taru said, “I cannot leave the children alone.”
2. Taru said, “I could not be leaving the children alone.”
3. Taru said, “I will not leave the children alone.”
4. Taru said, “She would not leave the children alone.”
Q.180 Select the most appropriate option to substitute the underlined segment in the given
sentence. If there is no need to substitute it, select ‘No substitution required’. 
Ariel was convinced that something fishy is going up behind his back.

Option:
1. No substitution required
2. was going on
3. goes on
4. was going up
Q.181 Select the most appropriate option to substitute the underlined segment in the given
sentence. If there is no need to substitute it, select ‘No substitution required’. 
Jamnalal Bajaj was one of the few businessmen who incurred the wrath of the British
for supporting the freedom movement.

Option:
1. in support of
2. supporting
3. No substitution required
4. to supporting
Q.182 Parts of the following sentence are given as options. Identify the segment that
contains a grammatical error. A confluence is a place when two or more rivers meet.

Option:
1. rivers meet
2. A confluence
3. when two or more
4. is a place
Q.183 Select the most appropriate word for the given group of words. 
Persons who rob ships

Option:
1. robbers
2. bandits
3. dacoits
4. pirates
Q.184 Parts of the following sentence are given as options. Identify the segment that
contains a grammatical error. 
I am sorry I haven’t learnt the poem at heart.

Option:
1. I am sorry
2. learnt the poem
3. I haven’t
4. at heart
Q.185 Parts of the following sentence are given as options. Identify the segment that
contains a grammatical error. 
Two flyovers have been propose in the new plan to decongest M.G. Road.

Option:
1. to decongest
2. have been propose
3. in the new plan
4. Two flyovers
Q.186 Parts of the following sentence are given as options. Identify the segment that
contains a grammatical error. 
A large amount of money he invested were wasted.

Option:
1. A large amount
2. of money
3. he invested
4. were wasted
Q.187 Select the most appropriate word for the given group of words. 
Something of little value or importance
Ans
1. trivial
2. cardinal
3. fundamental
4. scanty
Q.188 Select the most appropriate direct form of the given sentence. 
He regretted the mistake he had made in his calculations.

Option:
1. He said, “I regretted the mistake I made in my calculations.”
2. He said, “I am sorry for the mistake I made in his calculations.”
3. He said, “He regrets the mistake he made in my calculations.”
4. He said, “I regret the mistake I made in my calculations.”
Q.189 Parts of the following sentence are given as options. Identify the segment that
contains a grammatical error. 
No one have ever visited this place before.

Option:
1. place before
2. have ever
3. visited this
4. No one
Q.190 Select the most appropriate direct form of the given sentence. 
Anshul told me that his mother was not at home and that she would be back the
following day.

Option:
1. Anshul said to me, “My mother is not at home. She will be back tomorrow.”
2. Anshul said to me, “My mother is not at home. She would be back the following day.”
3. Anshul said to me, “His mother was not at home. She would be back tomorrow.”
4. Anshul said to me, “My mother was not at home. She will be back the following day.”
Q.191 Select the most appropriate meaning of the given idiom. 
Take exception

Option:
1. appreciate
2. object to
3. care for
4. deny
Q.192 Select the correct passive form of the given sentence. 
Our team scored 350 runs in the Inter-college Cricket Tournament.

Option:
1. Our team was scored by 350 runs in the Inter-college Cricket Tournament.
2. 350 runs have been scored by our team in the Inter-college Cricket Tournament.
3. 350 runs were scored by our team in the Inter-college Cricket Tournament.
4. 350 runs were scoring our team in the Inter-college Cricket Tournament.
Q.193 Select the most appropriate meaning of the given idiom. 
To call the shots

Option:
1. to be the person in charge
2. to be blissfully happy
3. to be in debt
4. to lack control
Q.194 Select the most appropriate word for the given group of words. 
Place where two or more rivers meet

Option:
1. confluence
2. strait
3. delta
4. estuary
Q.195 Select the most appropriate word for the given group of words. 
Two lengths of rope, wood or metal with crosspieces used for climbing up and down
walls

Option:
1. ladder
2. stairs
3. steps
4. railing
Q.196 Select the most appropriate option to substitute the underlined segment in the given
sentence. If there is no need to substitute it, select ‘No substitution required’. 
Our new accountant fall short in my expectations.

Option:
1. falls short of
2. fall short on
3. No substitution required
4. falls short in
Q.197 Select the most appropriate indirect form of the given sentence. 
I said to my friend, “Please help me arrange these books on the shelf.”

Option:
1. I asked my friend to help me arrange these books on the shelf.
2. I requested my friend to help me arrange those books on the shelf.
3. I ordered my friend to help me arrange those books on the shelf.
4. I told to my friend to please help me arrange those books on the shelf.
Q.198 Select the most appropriate direct form of the given sentence. 
Taru told me that Avika was having her online cooking class then.

Option:
1. Taru said to me, “Avika will be having her online cooking class now.”
2. Taru said to me, “Avika is having her online cooking class at that time.”
3. Taru said to me, “Avika is having her online cooking class now.”
4. Taru said to me, “Avika was having her online cooking class at this time.”
Q.199 Given below are four jumbled sentences. Select the option that gives their correct order.
A. Ben was eating an apple, and seemed to be in high spirits.
B. Ben Rogers came into view presently, the very boy whose ridicule he had been dreading.
C. Tom went on dipping the brush into the paint and whitewashing the fence, and paid no attention to Ben.
D. Tom took up his brush and calmly resumed his work.

Option:
1. CDBA
2. DBAC
3. DCBA
4. CBAD
Q.200 Select the most appropriate option to fill in the blank. 
This visit will not interfere ________ our plans.

Option:
1. from
2. with
3. into

4. at

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