SSC CGL (Tier - 1) Online Exam Paper - 2016 "held on 3 September 2016" Evening Shift (English Comprehension)

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SSC CGL (Tier - 1) Online Exam Paper - 2016 "held on 3 September 2016" Evening Shift (English Comprehension)

EXAM DATE : 3-September-2016
EXAM START TIME : 16:15:00
EXAM NAME : SSC Examination 2016

Question 76.In the following question, out of the four alternatives, choose the word which best expresses the meaning of the given word and click the button corresponding to it.

SYCOPHANT


Options:

1) PSYCHE
2) FLATTERER
3) CRITIC
4) SLAVE

Correct Answer: FLATTERER

Question 77.In the following question, out of the four alternatives, choose the word which is opposite in meaning to the given word and click the button corresponding to it.

FORLORN


Options:

1) JOYFUL
2) LUCKY
3) FORTUNATE
4) FREE

Correct Answer: JOYFUL

Question 78.Four words are given, out of which only one word is spelt correctly. Choose the correctly spelt word and click the button corresponding to it.

Options:

1) Separate
2) Saparate
3) Saperate
4) Seperate

Correct Answer: Separate

Question 79.In the following questions, one part of the sentence may have an error. Find out which part of the sentence has an error and click the button corresponding to it. If the sentence is free from error, click the "No error" option.

The book, being written (A) / in simple language, is suitable for children (B) / as it contains many good advices. (C) / No error (D)


Options:

1) A
2) B
3) C
4) D

Correct Answer: C

Question 80.In the following questions, one part of the sentence may have an error. Find out which part of the sentence has an error and click the button corresponding to it. If the sentence is free from error, click the "No error" option.

You are the man (A) / who have (B) / spoiled it (C) / No error (D)


Options:

1) A
2) B
3) C
4) D

Correct Answer: B

Question 81.In the following questions, one part of the sentence may have an error. Find out which part of the sentence has an error and click the button corresponding to it. If the sentence is free from error, click the "No error" option.

Everyday new inventions (A) / is make (B) / for the good of humanity (C) / No error (D)

Options:

1) A
2) B
3) C
4) D

Correct Answer: B

Question 82.The sentences given with blanks are to be filled with an appropriate word(s). Four alternatives are suggested for each question. For each question, choose the correct alternative and click the button corresponding to it.

The man was _______ his deafness

Options:

1) rewarded for
2) cured of
3) convicted by
4) saved at

Correct Answer: cured of

Question 83.The sentences given with blanks are to be filled with an appropriate word(s). Four alternatives are suggested for each question. For each question, choose the correct alternative and click the button corresponding to it.

He is the talk ________________


Options:

1) of the town
2) for the town
3) about the town
4) over the town

Correct Answer: of the town

Question 84.The sentences given with blanks are to be filled with an appropriate word(s). Four alternatives are suggested for each question. For each question, choose the correct alternative and click the button corresponding to it.

I ________ very much like to see my old classmates.

Options:

1) can
2) should
3) would
4) might

Correct Answer: would

Question 85.In each of the questions, four alternatives are given for the Idiom/Phrase. Choose the alternative which best expresses the meaning of the Idiom/Phrase and click the button corresponding to it.

Old head on young shoulders


Options:

1) To be intelligent when old
2) To be old and yet look young
3) To be wise beyond his years
4) To be smarter with age

Correct Answer: To be wise beyond his years

Question 86.In each of the questions, four alternatives are given for the Idiom/Phrase. Choose the alternative which best expresses the meaning of the Idiom/Phrase and click the button corresponding to it.

A wild-goose chase


Options:

1) A fruitful search
2) A pointless search
3) To search for a wild-goose
4) A hunting expedition

Correct Answer: A pointless search

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Question 87.In each of the questions, four alternatives are given for the Idiom/Phrase. Choose the alternative which best expresses the meaning of the Idiom/Phrase and click the button corresponding to it.

Hard of hearing

Options:

1) To be disturbed
2) To be confused
3) To be deaf
4) To be dumb

Correct Answer: To be deaf

Question 88.Out of the four alternatives, choose the one which can be substituted for the given words/sentences and click the button corresponding to it.

The art of delaying

Options:

1) Degeneration
2) Inflation
3) Procrastination
4) Regression

Correct Answer: Procrastination

Question 89.Out of the four alternatives, choose the one which can be substituted for the given words/sentences and click the button corresponding to it.

A doctor who specializes in the diseases of the eyes


Options:

1) Ophthalmologist
2) Optimist
3) Optician
4) Orthodontist

Correct Answer: Ophthalmologist

Question 90.Out of the four alternatives, choose the one which can be substituted for the given words/sentences and click the button corresponding to it.

Person who eats too much

Options:

1) Cannibal
2) Glutton
3) Obese
4) Carnivorous

Correct Answer: Glutton

Question 91.A sentence/a part of the sentence is underlined. Four alternatives are given to the underlined part which will improve the sentence. Choose the correct alternative and click the button corresponding to it. In case no improvement is needed, click the button corresponding to "No improvement".

The old woman invited the children to become a part in the celebration in her house


Options:

1) to be apart
2) to take part
3) to take apart
4) No improvement

Correct Answer: to take part

Question 92.A sentence/a part of the sentence is underlined. Four alternatives are given to the underlined part which will improve the sentence. Choose the correct alternative and click the button corresponding to it. In case no improvement is needed, click the button corresponding to "No improvement".

You are junior than me in age


Options:

1) to me in age.
2) of me in age.
3) to me at age.
4) No improvement

Correct Answer: to me in age.

Question 93.A sentence/a part of the sentence is underlined. Four alternatives are given to the underlined part which will improve the sentence. Choose the correct alternative and click the button corresponding to it. In case no improvement is needed, click the button corresponding to "No improvement".

Wealth is no doubts necessary for happiness in life.

Options:

1) was no doubt necessary
2) is no doubt necessary
3) is no doubting necessary
4) No improvement

Correct Answer: is no doubt necessary

Question 94.A sentence/a part of the sentence is underlined. Four alternatives are given to the underlined part which will improve the sentence. Choose the correct alternative and click the button corresponding to it. In case no improvement is needed, click the button corresponding to "No improvement".

Mumbai is larger than many other towns in India.

Options:

1) large
2) largest
3) big
4) No improvement

Correct Answer: No improvement

Question 95.A sentence/a part of the sentence is underlined. Four alternatives are given to the underlined part which will improve the sentence. Choose the correct alternative and click the button corresponding to it. In case no improvement is needed, click the button corresponding to "No improvement".

All people want to be happy, do they?

Options:

1) don't they?
2) are they?
3) didn't they?
4) No improvement

Correct Answer: don't they?

Question 96.A passage is given with 5 questions following it. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives and click the button corresponding to it. 

Worry is a very common thing. Even children worry as much as grown up people. In his childhood, the writer used to fear that his parents would die suddenly at night. His fear and anxiety was just imaginary. 

When he was on the war front in Mesopotamia, the writer came to a certain conclusion on worrying. He was a subaltern officer. It was not his duty to plan future actions of war. He was there only to carry out what the superiors would decide. So it was useless to worry. When he took that stand he slept soundly without worry. Here, the writer had some real reason to worry. But he could get rid of it when he found it was useless to worry. 

He followed the same principle when he was a prisoner of war and he was in Asiatic Turkey. There, too, he banished his worries because nothing of his future depended on himself. The future of the prisoners of war would depend on the various governments. Thus he was able to live there without much worry though he was a prisoner. 

But his deliberate suppression of worry during the war and as a prisoner did not wholly eradicate his worries. The fear had gone to his subconscious mind and remained there buried. After the war the writer was at home. But whenever a member of his family was absent he feared all sorts of mishap happening to him or her. Moreover, he had a recurring nightmare that he had become a prisoner of war and the war was not going to end. The worries without any real cause here were the manifestations of the fears that he had banished deliberately earlier.

Why was the writer able to live in jail without much worry?

Options:

1) Because nothing of his future depended on himself
2) He was comfortable in jail
3) Because he was a prisoner of war
4) Because worry is a common thing

Correct Answer: Because nothing of his future depended on himself

Question 97.A passage is given with 5 questions following it. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives and click the button corresponding to it. 

Worry is a very common thing. Even children worry as much as grown up people. In his childhood, the writer used to fear that his parents would die suddenly at night. His fear and anxiety was just imaginary. 

When he was on the war front in Mesopotamia, the writer came to a certain conclusion on worrying. He was a subaltern officer. It was not his duty to plan future actions of war. He was there only to carry out what the superiors would decide. So it was useless to worry. When he took that stand he slept soundly without worry. Here, the writer had some real reason to worry. But he could get rid of it when he found it was useless to worry. 

He followed the same principle when he was a prisoner of war and he was in Asiatic Turkey. There, too, he banished his worries because nothing of his future depended on himself. The future of the prisoners of war would depend on the various governments. Thus he was able to live there without much worry though he was a prisoner. 

But his deliberate suppression of worry during the war and as a prisoner did not wholly eradicate his worries. The fear had gone to his subconscious mind and remained there buried. After the war the writer was at home. But whenever a member of his family was absent he feared all sorts of mishap happening to him or her. Moreover, he had a recurring nightmare that he had become a prisoner of war and the war was not going to end. The worries without any real cause here were the manifestations of the fears that he had banished deliberately earlier.

What was the fear of the writer in his childhood?

Options:

1) That his parents might drive him out of home
2) That his parents would die suddenly at night
3) That he might fail in the examinations
4) That he might be made a prisoner

Correct Answer: That his parents would die suddenly at night

Question 98.A passage is given with 5 questions following it. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives and click the button corresponding to it. 

Worry is a very common thing. Even children worry as much as grown up people. In his childhood, the writer used to fear that his parents would die suddenly at night. His fear and anxiety was just imaginary. 

When he was on the war front in Mesopotamia, the writer came to a certain conclusion on worrying. He was a subaltern officer. It was not his duty to plan future actions of war. He was there only to carry out what the superiors would decide. So it was useless to worry. When he took that stand he slept soundly without worry. Here, the writer had some real reason to worry. But he could get rid of it when he found it was useless to worry. 

He followed the same principle when he was a prisoner of war and he was in Asiatic Turkey. There, too, he banished his worries because nothing of his future depended on himself. The future of the prisoners of war would depend on the various governments. Thus he was able to live there without much worry though he was a prisoner. 

But his deliberate suppression of worry during the war and as a prisoner did not wholly eradicate his worries. The fear had gone to his subconscious mind and remained there buried. After the war the writer was at home. But whenever a member of his family was absent he feared all sorts of mishap happening to him or her. Moreover, he had a recurring nightmare that he had become a prisoner of war and the war was not going to end. The worries without any real cause here were the manifestations of the fears that he had banished deliberately earlier.

Where was the writer when he concluded that worry was useless?

Options:

1) The writer was in Asiatic Turkey
2) The writer was at home
3) The writer was on the war front in Mesopotamia
4) The writer was in prison

Correct Answer: The writer was on the war front in Mesopotamia

Question 99.A passage is given with 5 questions following it. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives and click the button corresponding to it. 

Worry is a very common thing. Even children worry as much as grown up people. In his childhood, the writer used to fear that his parents would die suddenly at night. His fear and anxiety was just imaginary. 

When he was on the war front in Mesopotamia, the writer came to a certain conclusion on worrying. He was a subaltern officer. It was not his duty to plan future actions of war. He was there only to carry out what the superiors would decide. So it was useless to worry. When he took that stand he slept soundly without worry. Here, the writer had some real reason to worry. But he could get rid of it when he found it was useless to worry. 

He followed the same principle when he was a prisoner of war and he was in Asiatic Turkey. There, too, he banished his worries because nothing of his future depended on himself. The future of the prisoners of war would depend on the various governments. Thus he was able to live there without much worry though he was a prisoner. 

But his deliberate suppression of worry during the war and as a prisoner did not wholly eradicate his worries. The fear had gone to his subconscious mind and remained there buried. After the war the writer was at home. But whenever a member of his family was absent he feared all sorts of mishap happening to him or her. Moreover, he had a recurring nightmare that he had become a prisoner of war and the war was not going to end. The worries without any real cause here were the manifestations of the fears that he had banished deliberately earlier.

What was the recurring nightmare of the writer after the war was over?

Options:

1) He dreamt that he was a prisoner in a war that was not going to be over
2) He dreamt that his wife was in hospital
3) He dreamt that a member of his family had a mishap
4) He dreamt he was a prisoner of war in Asiatic Turkey

Correct Answer: He dreamt that he was a prisoner in a war that was not going to be over

Question 100.A passage is given with 5 questions following it. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives and click the button corresponding to it. 

Worry is a very common thing. Even children worry as much as grown up people. In his childhood, the writer used to fear that his parents would die suddenly at night. His fear and anxiety was just imaginary. 

When he was on the war front in Mesopotamia, the writer came to a certain conclusion on worrying. He was a subaltern officer. It was not his duty to plan future actions of war. He was there only to carry out what the superiors would decide. So it was useless to worry. When he took that stand he slept soundly without worry. Here, the writer had some real reason to worry. But he could get rid of it when he found it was useless to worry. 

He followed the same principle when he was a prisoner of war and he was in Asiatic Turkey. There, too, he banished his worries because nothing of his future depended on himself. The future of the prisoners of war would depend on the various governments. Thus he was able to live there without much worry though he was a prisoner. 

But his deliberate suppression of worry during the war and as a prisoner did not wholly eradicate his worries. The fear had gone to his subconscious mind and remained there buried. After the war the writer was at home. But whenever a member of his family was absent he feared all sorts of mishap happening to him or her. Moreover, he had a recurring nightmare that he had become a prisoner of war and the war was not going to end. The worries without any real cause here were the manifestations of the fears that he had banished deliberately earlier.

How does a cause of worry trouble us if we suppress our worry deliberately?

Options:

1) Causes of worry trouble us in various circumstances
2) Causes of worry remain in the subconscious mind and trouble us through bad dreams
3) Causes of worry cause imaginary anxiety
4) We cannot take actions cautiously and carefully

Correct Answer: Causes of worry remain in the subconscious mind and trouble us through bad dreams

 

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